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Ok, so I keep on hearing *reading* people saying that cow's milk has blood and pus in it here. Can anyone show me an article that talks about this? From a reputables site of course.
 

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Here's something that appears reasonably reputable. (I assume you don't want something like milksucks.com).

Quote:
U.S. Milk Quality Monitoring Using Bulk Tank Somatic Cell Counts

The National Mastitis Council and USDA have collaborated on a monitoring system to summarize U.S. milk quality. The system represents 37 percent of U.S. milk and 45 percent of U.S. dairy producers with permits to ship milk.

Bulk tank somatic cell count (BTSCC, a measure of the number of white blood cells per ml. of raw milk) was chosen as an indication of milk quality. BTSCC reflects the level of infection and resultant inflammation in the mammary gland of dairy cows and provides an indirect measure of the processing quality of milk. While BTSCC is not a public health concern, reasons to monitor BTSCC include domestic consumer demands for high quality, processor need for high quality raw milk, to help improve cow udder health, and potential pressure from international markets for documentation of our high-quality dairy products.
It then goes on to list the amount of this stuff in several states' milk samples.

http://nahms.aphis.usda.gov/dairy/da.../bulktnk94.htm

I've seen sites that list the acceptable quantities for each US state, but I'm too lazy to find one right now.
 

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This is taken from: http://www.vegetarian.org.uk/campaig...ml#undesirable

"Mastitis (inflammation of the mammary gland) is a widespread condition affecting cattle in the UK in which all or part of the udder suffers from an infection caused by bacteria entering through the teat (MDC, 2004). Mastitis may be referred to as subclinical (no symptoms) or clinical whereby symptoms include swelling, pain, hardness, milk clots or discoloured milk. The cow responds to the infection by generating white blood cells (somatic cells) which migrate to the affected area in an effort to combat the infection. These cells, along with cellular debris and necrotic (dead) tissue, are a component of pus and are excreted into the milk.

The number of somatic cells in the milk (the somatic cell count) provides an indication of the level of infection present. The somatic cell count usually forms part of a payment structure to farmers with defined thresholds of concentration determining the qualification for bonus payments or penalty charges (Berry et al., 2003). In the European Union the somatic cell limit is a maximum of 400,000 cells per ml in bulk milk (Dairy Products (Hygiene) Regulations, 1995). This means that milk containing 400 million pus cells per litre can be sold legally for human consumption. So one teaspoonful of milk could contain up to two million pus cells! "
 

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Appearantly the horrid conditions in factory farms cause infections on the cow's udder, so I think it is quite possible that blood and pus are in milk.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by OregonAmy View Post

Of course they are. Crushed bugs and blood are in canned vegetables, too.
Considering that there may have been insects in the ground when the vegetables were growing, that seems very possible as well.
But don't they usually make sure to get rid of bugs and such for vegetables?
 

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