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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so this is my first year gardening right and i'm a newbie in the fullest meaning of the word at gardening.<br><br>
so i transplanted some tomato plants yesterday into my outdoor garden. Had been growing them in pots and putting them outside some to ''harden'' them and they were doing well. buried them slightly deeper than they had been in the indoor pots and watered a little afterwards. now today just 24 hrs later they are already half-dead and the leaves are shriveled and wilted. The cherry tomato plant is even worse and the branches are broken/missing and there's only a few leaves.<br><br>
I know it can be a little hard on them when they first go outside, but this seems like a short ferry to plant hell if it continues in this direction any longer. not sure what i did wrong. my pepper and eggplant plants look perfect. I don't think it was rodents because aside from the cherry tomato nothing was broken/chewed, just dead.<br><br>
any ideas?
 

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It could be that you didn't thoroughly harden them off? It's a several week process for plants you started indoors...and you slowly give them more time outside each day starting in the shade and gradually letting them spend more time in the sun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yea idk, i did it on/off for about 2 weeks, but it had been some nasty weather with wind/cold so i didn't get them out every night, maybe like 4-5 days a week.<br><br>
at least they don't look worse today and they maybe look slightly better....was worried i'd get there after work today and just find a stump.
 

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I've experienced something like that when I put them in the ground during the heat of the day. Early evening or early morning were better times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
they've kinda stabilized...they don't look any worse than they did after 24 hrs but still far from how beautiful they were when they went into the ground.
 

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Another thing to keep in mind is that when you transplant any plant they require much more water than usual..... there roots etc have been disturbed and I always water them excessively for the first few days without drowning them (so regularly rather than a lot at once). tomatoes require a lot of water at the best of times so perhaps that is why.... having said that I have never grown my own tomatoes (wrong climate) but I have looked after my parents when I lived at home. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 
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