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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let's talk about it! Myths, beliefs, options, information, education, experiences, hopes, dreams...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Heaven, no. We have a ways to go for that! Just started it because we got off-topic in Christmas Shopping thread. It's just a topic I love and am passionate about.
 

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I just walked in from a concert and was wondering that myself <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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well, i have two kidlets.<br><br><br><br>
my son was born in a hospital with nurses and doctors and that whole experience.<br><br><br><br>
my daughter was born at home with a midwife and her assistant and my friends and family in attendance.<br><br><br><br>
if i ever were to have another babe, i would want another home birth. it was, far and away, the most amazing, empowering experience i've ever had in my entire life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have had a lot of friends who have had home births (some who have also have hospital births) and they say the same thing you do. I can't imagine the feeling of being at home and having everyone around you. <warm glow> Or maybe I <b>can</b> imagine. Any advice you would share with us who would like to have a midwife assisted home birth?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
By the way, this is the info I posted in the other thread about ultrasounds:<br><br><br><br>
If you think about what an ultrasound is, it's understandable how it can be damaging and upsetting to the baby. Ultrasound is what they use to break up big chunks of concrete that are set into the ground that they can't otherwise get out. Now, I realize that this is not the same level of ultrasound used on pregnant women but it's still the same vibrational energy. There have been studies where women who had more than one ultrasound had babies with lower birth weights than women who had only one ultrasound. There have also been animal experiments (bastards!) that had weird affects on the animals when exposed to ultrasound. Ultrasounds are said to be safe when not routinely used but most women I know are now going in for multiple ultrasounds in a healthy pregnancy. It's just something that I wouldn't want to expose my baby to if at all possible.<br><br><br><br>
The FDA approved the use of ultrasound (high frequency sound) for fetal imaging (sonogram) and fetal monitoring during labor without requiring manufacturers of the devices to advise the physician and the patient that <b>the delayed, long-term effects of ultrasound on the subsequent development of the fetus, and especially on the ova of the female fetus, are unknown.</b><br><br><br><br>
In February 1984 an FDA/NIH panel of experts issued a statement recommending against the routine use of ultrasound in obstetrics, stating that <b>"there is not enough evidence that routine screening with ultrasound benefits either the mother or the fetus."</b> The panel recommended that ultrasound be used only when there is a valid medical indication. That note of caution was expressed earlier by FDA officials during a Senate hearing on obstetric management in 1978. Unfortunately, the general public does not read federal proceedings, nor would they have heard FDA officer Marion Finkel in 1979 when she summarized the FDA's concern to health professionals:<br><br><br><br><b>"Increasing concern has arisen regarding the fetal safety of widely used diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics. Animal studies have been reported to reveal delayed neuromuscular development, altered emotional behavior, EEG (brain wave) changes, anomalies, and decreased survival. Genetic alterations have also been demonstrated in vitro systems."</b><br><br><br><br>
Several major research studies have failed to show that routine electronic fetal monitoring improves maternal and infant outcome except in very high-risk mothers. The fact that the FDA waited several years before bringing this and the above information to the attention of the public via a news release or the FDA Consumer magazine has led the public to assume falsely that diagnostic ultrasound used in fetal imagery and fetal monitoring is without risk.<br><br><br><br>
For further information read the report of the FDA's<br><br>
Center for Devices and Radiological Health entitled An<br><br>
Overview of Ultrasound: Theory, Measurement, Medical<br><br>
Applications, and Biological Effects. HHS Publication,<br><br>
FDA 82-8190, U.S. Govt. Printing Office, Washington,<br><br>
DC 20402.
 

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yes.<br><br><br><br>
i avoided ultrasound scans with both my pregnancies. i had ONE with my first, and that was only because the dr. tricked me by telling me she thought i might be carrying twins (which i found out later was b.s., it was never written on my chart, and i was never showing ANY symptoms of carrying twins). i had zero ultrasounds with my second.<br><br><br><br>
as for midwife assisted homebirth, i'd be happy to provide info but it is truly regional. in many states, it is illegal. here in b.c. the cost is covered by the govt in the same way doctors are so it is free, accesible (although not really since there aren't enough midwives to go around, yet), and legal. i think we're the only province that covers the expenses and makes it a legit' choice for a woman to make for herself.<br><br><br><br>
the key is to turn off all the fear your brain has been programmed to blast at you over the years and trust in your own body and it's ability to do the thing that it is biologically designed to do. we have been brainwashed into thinking that pregnancy and childbirth are a "disease" or illness that need to be treated by "professionals". but the truth of the matter is, it was only really in the last 50 years that doctor-assisted hospital birth became the "norm".<br><br><br><br>
all that aside, i do think there are instances where the mother and/or baby are at risk and i am glad that the medical system is there to assist with that. had there been any sign whatsoever of serious trouble with my pregnancy, my midwife was legally obligated to pass me on to an MD for further care, and i wouldn't have argued with her.<br><br><br><br>
my midwives were great in that they were ALL ABOUT INFORMED CHOICE for mothers and fathers. they never pressured me to have any tests i didn't want to, they explained everything to me in excrutiating detail, risks, benefits, blah blah blah. i was given the knowledge i needed to proceed with calm and make choices that were based on facts and discriminating thought processes. this was a very different experience than what i had had with my MD and the hospital birth the first time around. i was essentially kept in the dark about most things, and if i didn't ask very pointed questions about things (sometimes repeatedly) i wouldn't get any information or answers volunteered to me. i was just expected to do this or that without voicing my concerns etc.<br><br><br><br>
there are so many books on this subject. i could go on and on. but i'm tired now. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">
 

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Since I am the other half of any PoesÃ*a's birthing decsions I also gringe when I hear about doctors and treating prenancy as a disease. I am taking a course on medical sociology and we just finished a module on midwives, and the birthing process. It is scary what some of my fellow classmates think. "If I don't listen to my doctor I will have an unhealthy baby, the octor knows best...and I should never question him/her"
 

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I have a 2 year old and I wish so bad that I had given birth at home, I envy people who do that! I was so niave when I was pregnant, I worried that I wasn't getting enough nutrients. I drank cows milk everyday because all the pregnancy books told me to, I ate sooo much, too much! I listened to everything my doctor said because I was niave. I ended up having a c-section, because my baby was 10 1bs and breech, (even though my OB said she wasn't) which I thought would never happen to me (don't we all) Thankfully I've smartened up! The one good thing from my exprience is that I have learned a lot.<br><br>
I listen much more to my intution as a mother. I realize now that I have a choice in everything, I didn't see that before. I was terribly niave.<br><br>
Anyway, I don't see how anyone would want to have a hospital birth.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Anyway, I don't see how anyone would want to have a hospital birth.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
well, to be fair, there are plenty of women who feel more comfortable in a hospital setting, with all of the medical knowledge and equipment at their disposal. i think that it is as valid a choice as any, for women, as long as they are informed.<br><br>
INFORMED CHOICE. that's the key.<br><br><br><br>
also, when i gave birth to my son in the hospital it wasn't like, a totally traumatic and scary event where i felt completely unable to make decisions for how i wanted the labour and delivery to go. i had my own "birthing suite" with a shower and couches and windows and a tape deck and i had free range all over the hospital (which was great because i walked A LOT during labour to help speed things along). the only really negative stuff that happened was that i definitely felt pressure from the dr.'s and nurses to adhere to their time tables rather than let things run their course. but i had good advocates there with me, mom and my dh, and they helped run interference with the medical staff and helped me stay strong in my belief that i didn't want any intervention if it could be helped.<br><br><br><br>
a lot of women find having a professional labour support person with them (either midwife or doula) during their hospital births helps make the experience more empowering and less intimidating.<br><br><br><br>
women should be allowed to choose where they want to birth without judgement, whether it be at home, in a birthing center, or at a hospital. it's highly personal.
 

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You have to look up a woman by the name of Suzanne Arms. She is an amazingly well informed and deeply compassionate midwife out in Colorado. She has written several books on the subject, I think her best known one is called "Immaculate Deception; A New Look at Woman and Childbirth". I interviewed her a few years ago, and just fell in love with everything she represents.
 

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'what to expect when your expecting' should be called 'what to fear when you're expecting'! i did not enjoy it at all.<br><br><br><br>
try these titles:<br><br><br><br>
The Hip Mama's Survival Guide by Ariel Gore<br><br>
Birthing from Within by Pam England<br><br>
The Thinking Woman's Guide to a Better Birth by Henci Goer<br><br>
Guide to Pregnancy, Birth and the Newborn by Penny Simkin (Simkin is amazing!)<br><br>
Natural Childbirth the Bradley Way by Susan McCutcheon<br><br>
Spritual Midwifery by Ida May Gaskin<br><br>
Baby Catcher by Peggy Vincent<br><br>
The Mother of All Pregnancy Books by Ann Douglas<br><br>
Your Pregnancy Week by Week by some MD or another<br><br>
Anything by Sears & Sears<br><br>
The Complete Book of Pregnancy and Childbirth by Sheila Kitzinger (Kitzinger is also amazing!)<br><br>
A Child Is Born, by Lennart Nilsson (beautiful pictures of babes inutero)<br><br>
Mamatoto, which was put out by The Body Shop.
 

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I don't have children and most likely will not since I don't have a man (that helps a little...lol)and am getting (actually I already got) too old to have them. But if I was very healthy and younger I would probably try to have a baby at home with a midwife and a video cam (just kidding-I would not want myself filmed at that moment!). I think I would like to play whale sounds music, too. May sound weird but it feels right to me after hearing it.<br><br><br><br>
Have you heard of the births where the baby is born into water? It's supposed to be less traumatizing to the baby.<br><br><br><br>
I read at the chiro. office recently that birth is the first spinal truama for babies, too. Poor babies!<br><br><br><br>
I never knew that about ultrasounds Posia, interesting.
 

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Kreeli,<br><br>
It is definitly different for everybody. Personally I found my hospital birth to be a horrible experience and next time around I would definitly want a different setting, one which is not so clinical and uniniviting. The nurses at the hospital were very rude to me and they even fed my child formula without my consent. Having a baby in a hospital almost seems as though you're treating it as some kind of disease.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">there are plenty of women who feel more comfortable in a hospital setting, with all of the medical knowledge and equipment at their disposal.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Don't you think midwives are just as well informed medically?<br><br><br><br>
If you have a home birth and live very close to a hospital, then the medical equipment is there if you absolutely need it.<br><br><br><br>
It is all a personal choice, yes. Is there anybody here that has had each birth and has prefered the hospital setting, I wonder?
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Don't you think midwives are just as well informed medically?</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
absolutely they are entirely well-versed on the subjects of pregnancy and childbirth and the complications that may arise during either. but their area of expertise does not extend beyond that; and i'm certain some mothers prefer to have expertise in other matters at their beck and call.<br><br><br><br>
personally, i felt exceedingly confident in my midwives and very comfortable in their care. but even they admitted that should certain things happen during pregancy, labour and/or delivery, that they would have to pass me on to a doctor who knew how to handle these things in crisis.<br><br><br><br>
however, it is within the scope of my understanding that not all women would feel as confident with midwifery as i did. and it's important that we all feel supported in our choices, no matter what they are, with regards to how we want to experience our pregnancies, labours and births.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Kreeli</i><br><br><b><br><br>
A Child Is Born, by Lennart Nilsson (beautiful pictures of babes inutero)<br><br></b></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
I have a copy of this from the 70's. My mom showed me this book when I was 3 and she was pregnant with my brother. Recently I saw my mom was going to get rid of it, so I took it. Those pictures are so great, not only of the biology, but the people involved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
This conversation is so great. Kreeli, thanks for that list of books. Those go on my Christmas list next year and now I definitely know which books to buy my friend who is pregnant. I know she's going to go the route of epidural, as many drugs as possible, don't let me feel, I don't want to know, I'll do whatever they tell me to. But maybe I can find a book that just gives her some information to make educated choices. Women don't even know they're MAKING choices most of the time.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Tsila</i><br><br><b>Has anyone here read "Misconceptions" by Naomi Wolfe?</b></div>
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<br><br><br>
I read an excerpt from this in Ms. Magazine, I believe. Totally fascinating and revealing...<br><br><br><br>
I have't shared this with anyone beyond my family, but I think I'll share this here, just to gain a little perspective and insight from you guys.<br><br><br><br>
I've been married for about two and a half years. I stopped using all methods of contraception when I got married. ALL methods. And I've still not gotten pregnant. Before, I wasn't too concerned about this because I was trying to get settled and figure out my life post-college. But, here I am, wondering what in the hell is wrong with my body. When I went for my annual checkup with my gyno, I talked to her about it. She's actually a nurse practitioner, and I really really enjoy her, you know, as much as you can enjoy a gyno visit. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"><br><br><br><br>
She has me now charting my basal body temperature every morning and checking my mucous around the time of ovulation, to see if I'm actually ovulating. (Your body temp rises around the time of ovulation, about the 14th day of your cycle.) She said that they have patients chart for three months to make sure they're ovulating. AT this point, she can also order a semen analysis for Nick. Then, they bascially have the patient chart for a year or so because some women are actually seasonally fertile, you know, fertile mostly at particular times of the year. (This totally makes sense to me because my mother had all three of us about the time of the year.) So, they check to see if you're seasonally fertile before recommending any fertility therapy.<br><br><br><br>
So, that's where I am. Charting away. A little worried that something isn't working inside of me, but mostly trying to keep an open spirit about it.<br><br><br><br>
It's funny (not funny ha-ha, funny weird) that when you can't do something, you want to do it even more. But maybe it's not supposed to happen? Maybe it's not the right time? *shrugs*
 
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