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I have wanted to lose 5-10 pounds for awhile now. For about 3 months, I ran for 30 minutes, 3-5x a week, and I never lost any fat. Unfortunately, I injured my knee and I'm no longer able to run without creating problems with it, so I recently began using a stationary bike for 1 hour (19-20 miles), 5x a week. (That may sound like a fairly quick pace, but I rarely kick the resistance up, as it bothers my knee.)<br><br><br><br>
I recently read that your body doesn't begin burning fat until 20-30 minutes into a workout. Does anyone know if this is true?<br><br><br><br>
That would mean that while running, I was stopping just as my body was reaching the fat-burning point, so I didn't lose any chub.<br><br><br><br>
Would this mean that I would have better luck losing weight with 1 hour of cycling?
 

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i think so, at least from what i've learned/read.from about.com:<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">The fat burning zone is the zone at which you are doing enough work to burn fat. Your pulse (how fast your heart is beating per minute) determines this zone.<br><br><br><br>
The fat burning zone formula is the following:<br><br>
Fat burning zone=220-(Your Age) x (.75)<br><br><br><br>
The result of your formula will give you an approximate value of how fast your heart should be beating per minute.</div>
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<br><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">when exercise is not performed first thing in the morning it takes your body approximately anywhere between 20 to 30 minutes to start burning fat. This is because that it how long it takes the body to deplete its glycogen stores and switch to a fat burning environment. Therefore, it would not be efficient to perform aerobic exercise by itself at any other time during the day because you would need to perform it for 20-30 minutes just to get to the fat burning stage and for an additional 20 minutes just so that you burn fat.</div>
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<br><br><br><a href="http://bodybuilding.about.com/od/cardioexercisebasics/a/cardiobasics.htm" target="_blank">http://bodybuilding.about.com/od/car...rdiobasics.htm</a>
 

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I always thought the fat burning thing depended on how quickly your heart rate reached a certain "zone".<br><br><br><br>
By the way, I almost fell out of my chair when I read the title of this thread. I read it as 1 hour of baking better than 30 minutes running?? and my answer was a resounding YES!!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/pibo.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":pibo:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Aubrey</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><br><br><br>
I recently read that your body doesn't begin burning fat until 20-30 minutes into a workout. Does anyone know if this is true?<br><br><br></div>
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It is true in general* but picking a workout based on how much fat you will burn during the workout is short sighted. The better question is, which workout will cause the greatest increase in your basal metabolic rate over a period of time (say 24 hours). In general this is the shorter more intense workout.<br><br><br><br>
* It could be anywhere from 0 minutes to over an hour depending on the person, their glycogen stores, what they were doing before the workout etc. Great marathon runners often begin metabolizing fat almost immediately.
 

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>>In general this is the shorter more intense workout.>><br><br><br><br>
Enter interval training. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
ebola
 

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For what it is worth, Kenneth Cooper always recommends that people using a stationary bike monitor their pulse to see whether they are getting a decent workout. The "fat burning" formula Jenna posted is very similar to if not identical to the formula for aerobic training benefit. Cooper has charts that will let you compare the aerobic point value of running to an aerobic point equivalent for stationary biking. Aerobic points also correlate with calories burned during the exercise.<br><br><br><br>
I haven't seen any information on what exercises correlate with raising one's basal metabolic rate during non-exercise periods. Possibly some weight training (barbells/dumbbells) as well as aerobic exercise would be better for this purpose.<br><br><br><br>
As for Jenna's comments about exercising the first thing in the morning, I have read cautions against doing this, except for well-trained atheletes.<br><br><br><br>
ETA: I looked up the statistics in Cooper's book. According to this, if you ran for 30 minutes and covered three miles, that would earn you 14 aerobic points. If you pedalled your stationary bike for 55 minutes at 20 mph/75rpm and raised your heart rate to 140 or above*, that would earn you 14 points.<br><br><br><br>
*the 140 heart rate is a general measure, not age adjusted. You'd be better off using the age-adjusted formula Jenna mentioned above.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Gnome Chomsky</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
>>In general this is the shorter more intense workout.>><br><br><br><br>
Enter interval training. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
ebola</div>
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Yeah, google "HIIT". If your goal is fat loss 15 minutes of HIIT on the street in front of your home with a 5 minute warmup and cooldown will likely be more effective than 30 minutes of jogging or 60 minutes of moderate cycling.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>flipper</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I do jumping jacks for 15 minutes every morning and jog 2or 3 times a week.</div>
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OMG...15 min of straight jumping jacks? I would fall over if I did them for 5...nice going! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>remilard</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Yeah, google "HIIT". If your goal is fat loss 15 minutes of HIIT on the street in front of your home with a 5 minute warmup and cooldown will likely be more effective than 30 minutes of jogging or 60 minutes of moderate cycling.</div>
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Cool...I printed out Table 1 and 2
 

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I'm not sure if my goal is fat loss (probably not). I guess I'm going more for endurance on the bike.<br><br>
I did, however, find this gem:<br><br><br><br>
"When it comes to the heart rate question— whether to stay lower or higher — this is your answer. At a lower % of max heart rate (65%), a larger percentage of calories burned come from fat than at a higher heart rate (75-85%). HOWEVER, despite the percentages, you will burn more total calories and therefore more total fat calories at a higher heart rate."<br><br><br><br>
This is reassuring, as I aim for a HR of 155 BPM when doing steady-stead cardio (from a resting pulse of 60).<br><br><br><br>
ebola
 

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Losing the weight will be challenging but make sure you do it the right way. Eat the correct size portions of the healthy food. Drink LOTS of water, it helps to curb those pesky food boredom cravings. When you exercise changing the pace, i.e. going from low intensity to high or moderate is key. It helps you to burn more calories. Good luck.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/thumbsup.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":up:">
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>remilard</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Yeah, google "HIIT". If your goal is fat loss 15 minutes of HIIT on the street in front of your home with a 5 minute warmup and cooldown will likely be more effective than 30 minutes of jogging or 60 minutes of moderate cycling.</div>
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I looked up HIIT, and decided to start <a href="http://www.musclemedia.com/training/hiit_table.asp" target="_blank">this</a> plan today, but with the stationary bike. I did a 5 minute warm-up, then 4 minutes of intervals, followed by a cool-down. All I can say is WOW. I was more exhausted than I am am after doing an hour of cycling. I actually felt somewhat sick, but from what I've read, that's normal.<br><br><br><br>
I don't know if I'm doing the intervals correctly though...I was alternating 30 seconds of slow pedaling, then kicking up the resistance a couple levels and going as fast as I could for 30 seconds. I'm not sure if I'm supposed to be only pedalling faster, or increasing the resistance as well.<br><br><br><br>
I'm going to stick to this and see what happens...
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Joe</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><br><br><br>
As for Jenna's comments about exercising the first thing in the morning, I have read cautions against doing this, except for well-trained atheletes.<br></div>
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Really? Any idea why?<br><br><br><br>
I've been exercising first thing in the morning (well, about 30-45 minutes after I wake up) for nearly a year and a half... I'm definitely not an athlete though.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>meatless</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Really? Any idea why?<br><br><br><br>
I've been exercising first thing in the morning (well, about 30-45 minutes after I wake up) for nearly a year and a half... I'm definitely not an athlete though.</div>
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If it works for you, great. I'm not sure why this advice is given. There is kind of a big debate on the subject. Here are some cautions about exercising first-thing-in-the-morning.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><br>
Because morning is often thought of as the prime time for calorie-burning, many sleepily drag their bodies to the gym. Certain scientific research, however, suggests that later in the afternoon may be better for exercising.<br><br><br><br>
According to About.com, most people's body temperature and hormone levels peak around 6 p.m., meaning that the muscles are warmest and ready to perform then. The Web site suggests that by working out within three hours of this time, one can see the most benefits.<br><br><br><br>
...<br><br><br><br>
"A lot of magazines say, 'You have to workout in the morning to burn fat stores,'" Schaedler said. "But you don't want to start feeling light-headed 10 minutes into [exercising] or you won't get the most out of your workout."<br><br><br><br>
According to Schaedler, waking up and exercising on an empty stomach is not especially beneficial. While early morning cardio may help blast the calories from the night before, doing so with little energy will hinder, rather than help a workout, she said.<br><br><br></div>
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<br><br><br><a href="http://www.berkeleybeacon.com/news/2006/03/16/Sports/Morning.Noon.Or.Night-1711472.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.berkeleybeacon.com/news/2...-1711472.shtml</a><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">I am currently enrolled in medical school at Standford and my class has been taught that exercising in the evening is better because you burn off the fat and calories that you have gain during the day. If you exercise in the morning, especially if you have not eaten, you increase your appetite making you even hungrier, and most often causing one to consume more.</div>
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<div class="quote-block">Your best bet is to eat something - not a lot - before you exercise. The rationale here is that, if you don't eat, you stand the risk of your exercise, especially if it is vigorous exercise, drawing on muscle tissue and not fat for its energy for your workout.</div>
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<br><br><br><a href="http://www.faqs.org/qa/qa-1520.html" target="_blank">http://www.faqs.org/qa/qa-1520.html</a>
 

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Oh, I actually eat before I exercise in the morning, since I can't go very fast if I haven't. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br><br><br>
OK I'm glad to see it doesn't seem to be extremely serious reasons to not exercise in the morning. It's the only time I can get myself to do it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Thanks for the info Joe.
 

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That seems to be warning against not eating before exercise more than anything, but I guess a lot of people skip breakfast if they're up early. I always eat before I exercise or I get light-headed within ten minutes and headachy, but I find I need to eat pretty regularly throughout the day or I feel like that anyway.
 

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I haven't found the timing of my workouts to matter that much in the long run, except when marathon training. I do believe that working out first thing in the morning without eating helped me to train my body to rely on fat stores, but you aren't trying to go that fast when doing marathon training runs - the goal is just to run for a long, long time. The first 3 years in which I ran, I ran at completely random times of day, and never noticed any difference. Over the course of that time I lost 125 lbs. So the influence of time of day on calories burned seems negligible, in my experience. I had thought that the idea of exercising increasing appetite had been disproved. Whether it has or not, I actually find hard exercise to be an appetite suppressant. Likewise, burning calories in morning or evening supposedly makes no difference - if you burn them in the morning, you burn them in advance of eating them (your body will try to replenish your glycogen stores with what you eat after), and if you burn them at night you burn them after eating them. It's the net deficit that makes you lose weight, not timing.
 
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