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Can someone tell me the benefits of sprouted bread? A local HFS has sprouted bread in it's freezer section and I've often wondered if the bread was any good.<br><br><br><br>
So, here are the questions: What are the health benefits to sprouted bread? What is the consistency of the bread (dense, light, dry or moist)?
 

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I should be honest and say that I don't know all the benefits to sprouted bread... but I can tell you what I do know! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br><br><br>
First of all, it's great, and it's the only bread I eat! It's quite dense, it's a bit like eating ... hmmm... like a rye or something! I almost always toast mine before I eat it, and that helps make it easier to chew.<br><br><br><br>
The recipe is actually from Ezekiel 4:1 in the bible.
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Take thou also unto thee wheat, and barley, and beans, and lentils, and millet, and fitches, and put them in one vessel, and make thee bread thereof</div>
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Ezekiel brand is the one I always buy (many brands use honey but Ezekiel does not). Ezekiel brand bread contains a complete protein (I'm not sure if all sprouted bread does.)<br><br><br><br>
First, the grains are soaked whole, in water, overnight. The water sparks them into life.Then they are triturated (crushed, ground), and made into a whole grain bread. It's high in B vitamins, magnesium, and zinc, among other things (that people typically don't get enough of). It's completely unrefined. And much healthier than wheat bread, and it makes white bread look absolutely barbaric.
 

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Ezekiel is my main brand too. Although, if you have a Trader Joe's near you their sprouted soy bread is vegan and a bit lighter in texture than the biblical bread.<br><br><br><br>
Many people believe that sprouting grain before eating it activates enzymes that are useful to the body; many also think that they're easier to digest too. I guess that's the main draw, but I've found that sprouted breads are a consistently healthful, vegan choice when the pickings are slim.
 

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Yes! Not only are the enzymes activated....but every vitamin, mineral, and amino acid is multiplied tremendously. For instance sesame seeds are a great source of calcium....if you sprout them however, the calcium content is more than 100% what it was before it was sprouted. The percentage varies depending on what grain, bean, nut, or seed you sprout...but this rule applies to all of them.<br><br><br><br>
I love the sprouted bread as well.....Ezekiel and Genesis are yummy! However, I worry though about the fact that the sprouts have been cooked and wonder about whether or not that has affected the nutrient content and enzymes.
 

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It would seem that cooking would definitely destroy some of the active enzymes, herself. But, if the nutrient levels in some grains/seeds/beans is doubeled, a little loss should still make the bread more nutrient dense than if the grains were left "un-super-grained." But that's just the musings of someone who probably doesn't know what the heck she's talking about. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I don't know about the benefits of the bread but I really like the taste of the Ezekiel tortillas. My natural food store recently switched suppliers so they're bringing in Ezekiel tortillas and buns. Very yummy. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Herself</i><br><br><b>I love the sprouted bread as well.....Ezekiel and Genesis are yummy! However, I worry though about the fact that the sprouts have been cooked and wonder about whether or not that has affected the nutrient content and enzymes.</b></div>
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It's true, and most sprouted breads I saw, DO have flour in them.<br><br><br><br>
"True" raw sprouted bread is made only with ground sprouted grains (plus flavorings etc), and is dehydrated at a low temperature, either in the sun or in a dehydrator (usually at a temp lower than 110F). This keeps most enzymes active.<br><br><br><br>
I don't know if stores actually sell those. Didn't find any yet that explicitely stated that it was raw. You can buy some raw "baked" goods online though. Or make your own <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
BTW the jury is still out if the "living enzymes" theory has any truth to it.
 

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YUMMY! Sprouted grain bread has more protein than regular breads. The ones I've found contain no more or less calories than your plain old white breads or "whole wheat" breads. They have a great deal of substance. Chewy and dense would be the best description I can come up with, and they make great toast.
 

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I am under the impresion that enzymes are digested in the stomach. I don't think proteins can remain folded under such acidic conditions.
 

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Sprouted bread is much thicker then normal breads, but I have never had one that I didn't like. The Ezekiel brand tastes pretty good, and I get their tortillas. I always get the TJ's brand wheat sourdough cuz that's my fave for sandwiches. Next time you go shopping just compare the nutritional labels and you'll see which breads are better for you.
 
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