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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone here know anything about bee's?<br><br>
I have been invaded!<br><br>
Yesterday I was out back and other than bee's on the flowers at the fence line nothing was out of the norm. There are always bee's there but not normaly right by the house since no flowers are there.<br><br><br><br>
Today I was mopping my floor and was a little hot so I went out to the living area and opened up my french doors, I did not even look outside out the blinds or anything just opened the doors and flip the feet down and walked off.<br><br><br><br>
A few moments later I noticed a bee flying around my ankles, I walked back out to the living area and there are about 20 of the suckers flying around and more comming in.<br><br><br><br>
I closed the door and opened my blinds up all around the house and there are honey bee's buzzing around outside all on one side of my house and the back.<br><br><br><br>
WTH? Did a nest spring up over night? Can a nest spring up so fast?<br><br><br><br>
How the heck do I find the nest? Beause if there is a nest near I need to call a bee man to remove it and make sure they are not africanized.<br><br>
I think I got all of them that flew in the house but I'm not sure, is there a way to lure them into a trap?<br><br><br><br>
My oldest little girl has a sever phobia with bee's and wasps so I need to try and make sure there are none inside when she gets home.
 

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No advice, just wanted to say we had the same problem last month. We had a nest along our chimney, which is right by the door we always use. We also just got new windows that haven't been sealed properly, so quite a few got in the house. One afternoon I went to the kitchen to get lunch and there were four.. so I started to just tap them with the flyswatter to stun them, then tossed them back outside. Eventually we were up to 15, so I was getting rid of them any way I could. :/ It's not a fun situation! Where do you live? Now that it's cold here they aren't out and about anymore.<br><br><br><br>
Like Nigel said.. they are really attracted to honey, and anything else that's sweet. I got swarmed by a few while trying to make a peanut butter and honey sandwich. You'd have to be pretty brave to try to trap them that way though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am so not brave I walked about and wacked them.<br><br><br><br>
My house may smell sweet, lots of fruit laying about in bowls.<br><br>
I hope there is not a nest near, I live in San Antonio it was about 90 degree's here today I think
 

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Ordinary honey bees and bumble bees are unlikely to be a problem unless you harass them. This is unlike wasps and hornets, which are very testy. Unless the nest is actually on you house or a few feet away, there should be no need to remove it.<br><br><br><br>
Bees are not officially endangered, but there are less of them than there should be. They are indespensible for keeping much of our floral fertility including the flora of organic and veganic gardeners. Please do not hurt any bees unless it is absolutely necessary. Even if they sting, most people do not have a severe reaction. However they rarely sting -- even if mildly antagonized.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Soilman I do not know where you are from but the bee's down here are far more aggressive than the wasps, generaly speaking of course occasionaly they just kind of buzz up to you with no problems but most the time when they buzz up even if you do not move the little buggers sting you <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/blank.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":|"><br><br><br><br>
I love bumble bees though they are funny, I sing looney tunes songs when I see them ,
 

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Well the bees where I live, if I moved toward them, they calmly moved away. They did their best to avoid a confrontation. They never buzzed up to me. Then, I don't wear floral fragrances that smell like the flowers they like.<br><br><br><br>
I used to see them in my garden all the time, hanging around flowers and sucking up nectar. I could move around in my garden without worrying that if I accidentally got too near one, or even bumped into one, that they would care. They just keep on sucking up nectar or buzzing around flowers. If I were to actually brush right up near one, it would generally just move away a few inches, to get out of my way. We lived pretty peacably together. However a wasp or hornet -- I always had to be careful I didn't get near one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ahh you must live up north then, not all bees are agressive here but a good many are, I do not wear floral sents or anything either but some bee's are highly aggressive and will go out of thier way to sting people.<br><br>
I have been chanced more than a few times <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:"> mean little bastards<br><br><br><br>
I'm just unsure why I have so many buzzing out outside, or how to make them go away , my poor dogs already got stung and they are upset that they can not go out.<br><br>
Kids also have to stay in, which is not an issue if they are just passing through but I am worried there may be a nest somewhere
 

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could someone have a hive nearby? our horses were attacked last year and we discovered someone on the next block had a hive. we never had another problem with them attacking but I do see them buzzing around a lot.
 

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"Ahh you must live up north then"<br><br><br><br>
Err, I live in NY now; but I found the bees in Florida to be only slightly more threatening than the NY bees. The Florida bees used to swarm together and chase after me if I ran past their hive -- but they never stung me.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>soilman</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
"Ahh you must live up north then"<br><br><br><br>
Err, I live in NY now; but I found the bees in Florida to be only slightly more threatening than the NY bees. The Florida bees used to swarm together and chase after me if I ran past their hive -- but they never stung me.</div>
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Ayerlin lives in Texas- the "killer" bees have just started to move into that area the last few years as far as i know.<br><br><br><br>
to the OP, you need to find that nest before one of your kids do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes we have africanized bee's here, I do not know how big of an issue they are, large enough that Metro Health is called if a nest is suspected in a public area. I know there have been some attacks over the last few years.<br><br><br><br>
I have not found a nest or area that looks like it could be a nest but what the heck do I know.<br><br>
It is dark now so I do not see any buzzing about but right up until twighlight they were still buzzing around my outside windows.<br><br>
Lots of them , not like in a big glob though just like 6 or 7 at each window and more flying around.<br><br><br><br>
Hopefully my neighbors will be home tomarrow and I can go over into thier yard and look about.<br><br>
If the bee's are still there though I won't have much of a choice but to call a bee keeper to track them down and either move or destroy them.<br><br>
Can not have them hanging around. Even if they are just normal honey bee's they are a danger to my kids and dogs not to mention other peoples children and pets.
 

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Normal honey bees are very little danger unless you are allergic to their sting. Most people who are allergic do not have fatal reactions, and bees rarely sting unless provoked <i>repeatedly,</i> but if there is a nest right near your house you should remove it. Allergic reactions can be quite unpleasant, even if not fatal. You don't want to have to go to the doctor for cortisone treatments, if you can getting stung, instead. Good screens on all your windows are very effective at keeping bees out of a house. Indoor bees are a problem as they feel claustrophobic and are more likely to become pesty. Still, they rarely sting. I've never seen them purposely try to get indoors, the way mosquitos and crickets do, however I suppose if you have plants inside that they like, it is possible.<br><br><br><br>
And again: some plants must have bees to live, including many of the food plants we eat like melons and squashes.<br><br><br><br>
Kids should be instructed not to fool around with a bees nest, and most certainly not with a wasp or hornet's nest. However honey bees are generally so gentle that you can usually go right up to their nest and poke at it -- and they still won't sting you. They will fly around you and warn you first. Buzz you and try to scare you away. They only sting as a last resort. This is very much in contrast to hornets and wasps, which will go OUT of their way to attack humans that they just THINK might pose a danger in the future.
 

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I used to live in Houston and one day, while playing outside in the sprinkler with my brother, I got stung. My brother was chasing me around, hitting me with something... I felt something on my wrist and when I looked down, a bee was stinging me. That was the first and only time I've been stung.<br><br><br><br>
They arn't quite the same as they are up here (in Nova Scotia) We have the bright, fuzzy bees. Down there, they are nasty little buggers, brown striped and not as cute.<br><br><br><br>
Here's what I found on google: "Bumble bees are much less aggressive than honey bees. Generally they will not attack a human at all, unless their life is under threat. Don't wave your arms wildly in their presence, stand quietly and once they smell you are not a flower with pollen they will move gently away."<br><br><br><br>
I know up here, we have bumble bees.
 

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Bees do look cute. Wasps and hornets look very similar to bees, but not as cut. They tend to fly more and hover less. Bees are kinda of plump looking. Wasps and hornets look thin and gaunt or something.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellowjacket" target="_blank">This</a> is not a bee. It is a wasp. A hornet. I think a hornet is a kind of wasp. In any case, these yellow-jacket wasps are very aggressive. They sem to be able to indentify human beings, and remember you, and attack you later, if you were to bother them a minute or so earlier. Bees, on the other hand, don't seem to hold a grudge like that.<br><br><br><br>
Bumblebee <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bumble_bee" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bumble_bee</a><br><br>
honey bee <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey_bee" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey_bee</a><br><br><br><br>
The bumblebees, i think they are, that I saw in my garden, seemed all to sweetie-pies, honeys. They only sting when proved repeatedly. If I accidentlay walked into one, it just moved a few feet away and got busy on another flower.<br><br><br><br>
While wasps buzz like bees, their buzz sounds menacing to me. I can't put my finger on what is different about it, but I sense menace; I don't sense menace from the buzzing of bees.
 

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From one of the links above<br><br><br><br>
"Bumblebees are in danger in many developed countries due to habitat destruction and collateral pesticide damage. In Britain, until relatively recently, 19 species of native true bumblebee were recognised along with six species of cuckoo bumblebees (bumblebees that trick other species into looking after their young). Of these, three have already become extinct[1], eight are in serious decline and only six remain widespread. A decline in bumblebee numbers could cause large-scale sweeping changes to the countryside, due to inadequate pollination of certain plants. In response to this, a new organisation has recently been set up - The Bumblebee Conservation Trust aims to halt these declines through conservation and education (see links)."<br><br><br><br>
It is best to avoid harming them if possible. Please do not hurt them.<br><br><br><br>
I have never seen a bee flying around my ankle, or annoying me in any way, except the ones that accidentally got into my car, and were panicked by being trapped. Wasps on the other hand, have hung around me, menacingly. But never bees.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>purrpelle</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
soilman, the bees that Arylin has in Texas are aggressive africanized bees. they can be dangerous.</div>
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Though the "Africanized bees" are in Texas, that doesn't mean that Ayrlin's are that type. Actually, they don't sound like it. The Africanised bees swarm in very large numbers and if they are nesting around her house, it would be pretty obvious where they are.<br><br><br><br>
Soilman makes a good point; to sum: honey bees seem curious in nature so may fly around you with little provocation, but you have to push them to sting you. Wasps and hornets, on the other hand, are on a hardcore mission once they start after you.
 

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If they're bumble bees or honey bees or that sort of thing, you can hire someone to "relocate" them. If they're malicious bees of some sort, your best bet may just be to hire an exterminator.
 
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