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I normally buy canned beans but i hate recycling 20 cans a week. I soaked some pintos last night but I'm wondering do I still have to boil them before I sauté them, and if so for how long?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ebonyvegetarian View Post

I normally buy canned beans but i hate recycling 20 cans a week. I soaked some pintos last night but I'm wondering do I still have to boil them before I sauté them, and if so for how long?
Usually, it tells you on the package how long to soak and how long to cook. I looked in my pantry and the package of pinto beans I had did not have this information. Other packages of dried beans recommended cooking them 1 1/2 to 2 hours after they were done soaking.

This site says to cook pintos 4 hours after soaking.

http://www.essortment.com/cook-dry-p...ans-41159.html

Quote:
Pour out the [soak] water and fill with clean tap water, covering beans at least one inch above the beans. Bring beans to boil. Reduce heat and simmer with lid on for about four hours, checking every hour to make sure beans continue to have enough water.
If you have a slow cooker (commonly called a crock-pot), you can cook the pinto beans all day on low. Just make sure that the water level is filled as high as it can be so it won't go dry.

Some beans cook faster depending on how old they are. Beans are done when tender when poked with a fork or by tasting. If the beans run out of water while cooking, they will be dry and have a burnt taste. It is important for them to always have plenty of water.
Since you should be checking the water level periodically, you might try removing some pinto beans after two hours and tasting them. If you think they are tender enough, then you can stop simmering them and proceed to proceed to sauteeing them in accordance with the rest of your recipe.
 

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The best bit of advice that I took was from the frugal forum on this board.

Buy the dried beans, and cook them in bulk (I use my slow cooker on the weekends, so that I can be there when they finish- ugh overcooked beans), then I drain (or not in the case of hummus chickpeas) and ziploc into "can sized" portions and freeze!

Voila! no cans, no extra sodium, UBERLY cheaper beans available for the whole week, or however long. I like using my slow cooker bc i dont soak, I just turn it on and check back when it smells right, all of the gross stuff floats to the top so you dont save that water. I used to be so annoyed with planning to soak.

I have done this with black beans, chick peas and kidney beans as my favorites
cause I use them most. I did limabeans this weekend and made a mean hummus.
 

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yes, to answer your question, you do need to cook them after soaking. Cooking your own beans is so much cheaper and healthier than buying cans!
 

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Cooking your own is the way to go, I agree. Much more cost effective and lets you be in control of how you like them done. I usually boil for 30 min, turn off the heat and let them soak over night. Next day, drain ,cover with water, add what you like and simmer on low for about 5 hours. Some take longer, such as chickpeas. It does depend on the kind of bean and if they're old.
So... as has been said, yes you have to cook them and it depends on the kind of bean and how tender you like them.
 

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Yeah, you pretty much have to pre-cook beans for any dish you plan to use them in, unless it's like a bean soup or something... then you would cook them with the soup.

I like to soak them overnight, slow cook them for about 6-8 hours the next day (change the water), and then freeze them in 1.5 - 2 cup batches, which is about equal to one can. It's cheaper, and you have control over the sodium and sugar levels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yay I'll use my slow cooker and freeze them
 

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Here's a helpful cooking chart:
http://weblife.org/beanchart.html

Never cook beans with tomatoes-inhibits softening. I think salt does too.
Soaking and rinsing helps take away what causes gas.
If you find they're not softening, a pinch of baking soda does help.
If it's warm, don't let the soaking beans sit out-refridgerate.
Bringing to a boil, turning off heat and sit for an hour, then rinse, fill and cook works as well as soaking.

I have to ask-what is the benefit of a slow cooker? I've never cooked any bean longer than 3 hours after soaking-and that was after adding other things as soup.
 

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Laziness. You don't have to check the water level, you can leave it on while you're at work, blah blah blah.
 

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I have just started to cook my own dried beans. The bag for both chickpeas and black beans said soak overnight then boil for 10 minutes, reduce heat to simmer for 40-45 minutes. I soaked from 10pm until i got home from work at 2:00 and then cooked them. The black beans took longer than that--about an hour I guess. I made enough for 3 tins worth of beans and they are in the fridge. I made them saturday and used one saturday night, one sunday in some gluten free black bean brownies and the I'll use the last ones tonight. But I would like to not eat the same sort of bean 3 days in a row if you know what I mean.

Questions about freezing--or rather defrosting. How do you defrost and what is the texture like? I can see defrosting in a soup you plan to puree it wouldn't matter. But what about roasting them in the oven--I often roast chickpeas --would they go all funky and mushy? Or mixed in with a grain and veg and a dressing to make a salad--are they mealy and weird after defrosting?

I am so new to this as I've always been a beans in a can girl but it waaaay cheaper this way and we need to seriously start saving money. Thanks.
 

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I grew tired of the "canned" taste of canned beans. I bought a smaller size pressure cooker.

I love it. Soak the beans while at work, then cook them in 10-20 minutes depending on the bean.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by disney.jessica View Post

Is a crockpot the same as a slow cooker, and if so how do you adjust the times for cooking beans in a crockpot?
They're the same thing. I generally cook my beans after soaking them overnight for about 8 hours on low in the crockpot but it can be a trial and error thing. Sometimes if the beans are old, you need to extend the cooking time.
 

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20 cans a week!?!!?


By yourself or do you have a small army in your backyard?

Anyways, if you really love your beans, especially your pintos, you may enjoy learning to cook with a pressure cooker. Perfect beans every time. I don't use one myself, but I love the velvety texture of pressure-cooked pinto beans.
 

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I hate to be Mr. Killjoy, but let me caution you all about using pressure cookers to cook beans. The more modern pressure cookers have multiple, redundant safety features that allow you to do things like cook beans in them. But the older ones (and maybe cheaper ones) do not. The issue is whether the skins of the beans might come loose and block the ports on the pressure cooker, thus not allowing the pressure to be properly regulated and possibly causing an explosion.

So, if you are buying a new pressure cooker, be sure to do a little research on it, on its safety features, and on whether its manufacturer thinks it is ok to use to cook beans.

If you are looking to buy an older pressure cooker at a garage sale or thrift store, you may be asking for trouble if you use it to try to cook beans.
 

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Not sure if I just missed something or if you're just tossing out a precation, but slow cookers/ crockpots are entirely different than pressure cookers. I know they are pretty often confused.
 
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