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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wonder about the ability to adapt to legumes?
I get bloated when I eat them but have heard that long-term-vegetarians don't have this problem due to long exposure.

Is this true? Will the stomach adapt to legumes after some time?
If this happens, what are the mechanisms behind this? Does the body create new intestinal bacteria and enzymes or something?
How long does it take for the body to adapt?
 

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For starters, this belongs in more like the vegetarian, or new to vegetarian forum.
Community assistence is for things like how to make your avatar, multiquote, questions in general about veggieboards.

I've never had a problem with beans, although this has been a common problem with people new to plant based diets. It could be a fiber issue, or just sensitive to the enzymes in beans. I regularly use a bay leaf in cooking, and that is recommended for reducing gas, so maybe it does! Kombu ( a type of seaweed) cooked with beans is also recommended.
Are you talking about cooking dry beans or canned? If you're cooking dry, make sure to soak overnight, drain and rinse well, then add fresh water. When it starts to boil, skim off the foam.
 

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Thread has been moved.

I don't have a problem with beans and bloating, per se. I have noticed lately that I'm quite gassy in general. I have no idea if its related to my vegetarianism, but I've been a vegetarian for almost three years, so likely not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm talking about both dried beans and canned beans. I can eat black beans in general but when I eat some form of white bean I get bloated. Maybe it's just about adaptation?

I want to know if the body can adapt to eating a high fiber/legumes-diet. I've heard that new bacteria is created in the gut to make this possible, but how long will it take?
I mean there are plenty of vegetarians eating legumes in every meal and every day without this problem right?
 

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Beans do have a reputation among omnis for causing gas and making your #2 smell vile. They do have a way of clearing you out, and what is in your digestive system when you eat meat usually is vile and putrid, and beans have a way of clearing this out. Long-term vegans are going to have a cleaner digestive tract, which is why neither our gas or our #2 smells particularly nasty most of the time. So basically detox your body and then you shouldn't have any problem with beans.

Well, you asked!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post

I want to know if the body can adapt to eating a high fiber/legumes-diet. I've heard that new bacteria is created in the gut to make this possible, but how long will it take?
You could just try it and find out
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm quite skeptic about "de-tox". I want to have more scientific evidence for this. Could some experienced vegan or vegetarian tell me which beans cause the most flatulence? Is it the bigger beans like big white beans? They're the ones I've had the most trouble with.
Maybe smaller beans are easier to digest?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post

I'm quite skeptic about "de-tox". I want to have more scientific evidence for this. Could some experienced vegan or vegetarian tell me which beans cause the most flatulence? Is it the bigger beans like big white beans? They're the ones I've had the most trouble with.
Maybe smaller beans are easier to digest?
I do believe vegan and perhaps vegetarian gas smells a lot less offensive than that from meat-eaters. Have you ever been unfortunate enough to be around a cat with gas? Just saying. I've been told the reason could be the process that breaks down meat is a rotting process, whereas vegetables are broken down through fermentation. Not sure whether that is accurate.

As for which causes the most flatulence, I believe this varies a bit from person to person. For example, I know some people have trouble with soya beans and soya products in general. Also note that there are different ways of preparing beans. If you soak and boil your own beans you must take real care to do it correctly. Boil them properly to minimise the challenge for your digestive system. I believe low heat over a long time is the best.
 

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Assuming you're not allergic, your body should adjust. There's a thread like this every other week.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post

I'm quite skeptic about "de-tox". I want to have more scientific evidence for this. Could some experienced vegan or vegetarian tell me which beans cause the most flatulence? Is it the bigger beans like big white beans? They're the ones I've had the most trouble with.
Maybe smaller beans are easier to digest?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indian Summer View Post

I do believe vegan and perhaps vegetarian gas smells a lot less offensive than that from meat-eaters. Have you ever been unfortunate enough to be around a cat with gas? Just saying. I've been told the reason could be the process that breaks down meat is a rotting process, whereas vegetables are broken down through fermentation. Not sure whether that is accurate.

As for which causes the most flatulence, I believe this varies a bit from person to person. For example, I know some people have trouble with soya beans and soya products in general. Also note that there are different ways of preparing beans. If you soak and boil your own beans you must take real care to do it correctly. Boil them properly to minimise the challenge for your digestive system. I believe low heat over a long time is the best.
The way that it was explained to me is that for humans, it takes 3 days for food to pass through the digestive system. For true carnivores such as cats and dogs, it takes a day. Inside your body, its 98.6F, or a temperature comparable to a sweltering summer's day. Now imagine that you left a piece of meat outside for 3 days in the middle of summer, of course it's going to be revolting and probably growing all sorts of weird stuff too, which end up in your body and often stuck there, it often takes on the texture of mucus in the digestive system, which then hardens and often stays up there for years. My cats don't have this problem as food doesn't stay in them for nearly as long. In fact, in the wild, cats usually catch something, eat it, eat a plant such as grass to get their food to go through their system, and then they let their digestive systems rest for a day or more in order to detox. Herbivores tend to graze, while carnivores tend to binge and then rest.
 

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Originally Posted by Mia82 View Post

it often takes on the texture of mucus in the digestive system, which then hardens and often stays up there for years.
I'll confess I've not done a lot of human biology, but this sounds highly implausible. Got anything to support this?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post

Could some experienced vegan or vegetarian tell me which beans cause the most flatulence? Is it the bigger beans like big white beans? They're the ones I've had the most trouble with.
Maybe smaller beans are easier to digest?
look at the first link that I gave you
 

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Originally Posted by creep View Post

Assuming you're not allergic, your body should adjust.
What she said. It takes a while to get used to the extra fiber.

I, however, do not think veg*n gas smells better than omni gas. It's all disgusting.
 

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I do know meat takes quite a while for humans to digest! If you're just in the beginnings of eating veg, it will take quite some time for your body to naturally clean itself out. This could be meant by "detox".
Yes, I definitly say meat farts are far more horrible! I only occcasionally have gas now, and it's almost always after green smoothies, or apples-then it's only sorta like a rotten vegetable, and the smell dissapates quickly.
I would question how often the OP has bowel movements? Maybe ops just adjusting to fiber
 

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I haven't had a problem with beans thus far and I eat about 2-3 cups (cooked) a day right now. At the same time, I used to drink a LOT of milk even though I'm lactose intolerant (one program I was on had me drinking a gallon a day -- ugh). I think my body may be ready for anything after it adjusted to that -- I don't drink regular milk anymore though.
The point is that your body can and should adjust to it.
 

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Well, ok then, and advance warning, if you're grossed out easily you may want to skip this post!

The evidence I've seen is from my own body. I used to have terrible IBS. When I went vegan, I lost 8 lbs/3.5 kg in my first 2 weeks, and I had more #2 come out of me than I have seen in my life, which smelled like road kill. Now, my weight has levelled off, and my IBS is cured.
 
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