VeggieBoards banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an old (ca. 2001) computer running WinME and a new (2006) computer running XP. Both have ethernet ports. What all do I need to network them? Just a hub and cable? I saw a wired 5-port ethernet hub in WalMart (of all places) for $30. So I am really tempted to use that to network my two computers.

I had some electrical damage to the phone jacks in my office area, but the jacks in my bedroom seem to work fine. If I can network the two computers, then I might get DSL, put the DSL modem in the bedroom, and then just use the network and not have to worry about fixing the internal wiring damage.

A few months ago I went into CompUSA and tried looking for network hubs, but all they had was wireless. I am really not that interested in such a high tech solution at this point.

Can any kind person give me a few pointers about this? I've never used ethernet connections nor done networking before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,182 Posts
If you want to split up your DSL internet connection between multiple computers, I recommend you get a router. You could probably pick one up for under $40 at any cookie cutter computer store. It should come with instructions on how to set up your network.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Wonder View Post

If you want to split up your DSL internet connection between multiple computers, I recommend you get a router. You could probably pick one up for under $40 at any cookie cutter computer store. It should come with instructions on how to set up your network.
Pardon my ignorance, but what is the difference between a router and an ethernet hub?

Also, I do not have the DSL line yet, so suppose I never get a DSL line. Would a router allow me to set up a network anyway? I would like to do the network thing before doing the DSL.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,182 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe View Post

Pardon my ignorance, but what is the difference between a router and an ethernet hub?
Most ISPs give you 1 IP address, a router lets you use this IP address for all your computers while a hub would only allow 1 computer at a time to connect to the internet, unless you purchased additional IPs from your ISP. The router is basically acting like the computer connecting to the internet and it splits up it's connection to the computers that connect to it. A hub is more like a telephone splitter, multiple computers can connect to it, but only one call can be made unless you purchase a additional lines from your ISP.

Quote:
Also, I do not have the DSL line yet, so suppose I never get a DSL line. Would a router allow me to set up a network anyway? I would like to do the network thing before doing the DSL.
Yes, a router would allow you to set up a network without having an active internet connection. You could also use your router to share your current internet connection between all your computers. But you don't necessarily need a router to set up a network. If both of your computers have ethernet ports and you only want to connect the 2 computers, you can technically set up a network between them and share you internet connection without a router. Windows XP has something called Internet Connection Sharing that you should be able to use to share your internet connection to your old computer. It basically makes your computer act like a router. The only downside is that your computer has to be on in order to share the internet connection. I'm also pretty certain it would allow you to share files/printer between the 2 computers. Good luck.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,763 Posts
If you have only 2 computers, all you really need is a special piece of ethernet cable that is configured especially for hooking together 2 computers (some of the wires are reversed, from normal ethernet cable). You don't need a hub. If you don't want internet, you don't need ICS either. Peer to peer networking is built in to the standard config of XP and me.

However if you want DSL internet on both computers, you have 3 ways to go (1) hook up one computer to the net (the better one) using a usb cable to the broadband modem and hook up the 2 computers with the ethernet wire. Use MS Internet Connection Sharing. It is on your windows disk. Check the Help file to see how to set it up. (2) put a second NIC in one of the computers (the better one) and use that to hook up to the DSL modem, and use the othre NIC to hook up to the other computer. Use ICS. (3) Get a wired router and hook up a NIC from each computer to the router. You won't need ICS then, or a firewall. This is the best way to go. You could probably get a used wirey router on ebay for around $15.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by soilman View Post

If you have only 2 computers, all you really need is a special piece of ethernet cable that is configured especially for hooking together 2 computers (some of the wires are reversed, from normal ethernet cable). You don't need a hub. If you don't want internet, you don't need ICS either. Peer to peer networking is built in to the standard config of XP and me.
I actually have three or possibly four computers I might like to network.

1. the XP PC, 2. the ME PC, 3. a laptop running Win98 that I think has an ethernet port, 4. an iMac running OS 9.2. Hooking up 1 & 2 is something I almost definitely want to do; hooking 3 to that is a maybe; hooking 4 to all that is a remote possibility. I thought I should start simple (and add elements), rather than start with a Grand Scheme in mind.

On my XP machine I have:

1394 Net Adapter

\tIP Address: \t[omitted]

\tGateway: \t[omitted]

\tPhysical Address: \t[omitted]

Intel(R) PRO/1000 PM Network Connection

\tDhcp Server: \tnone responded

\tPhysical Address: \t[omitted]

RAS Async Adapter

Networking Dns Servers: \t[omitted] [omitted]

On my ME machine I have:

3Com 3C920 Integrated Fast Ethernet Controller (3C905C-TX Compatible)

\tPhysical Address: \t[omitted]

Quote:
Originally Posted by soilman View Post

However if you want DSL internet on both computers, you have 3 ways to go (1) hook up one computer to the net (the better one) using a usb cable to the broadband modem and hook up the 2 computers with the ethernet wire. Use MS Internet Connection Sharing. It is on your windows disk. Check the Help file to see how to set it up. (2) put a second NIC in one of the computers (the better one) and use that to hook up to the DSL modem, and use the othre NIC to hook up to the other computer. Use ICS. (3) Get a wired router and hook up a NIC from each computer to the router. You won't need ICS then, or a firewall. This is the best way to go. You could probably get a used wirey router on ebay for around $15.
What is a NIC?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,763 Posts
NIC = Network Interface Card. Such as an ethernet card. Although the term might be used loosely to refer to a network interface controller built into the system board as opposed to actually existing on a separate plug-in card.

It is probably a good idea to get a hub even if you have only 2 computers, so that you could expand easily in the future, and so that you don't have to remember that one of your ethernet wires is different than the others.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdufstuff View Post

What is it that you are trying to gain from a network? That may help suggest a setup.
That's a good question. Except that I've never set up nor used a network before, so one of the things would be to learn about networking computers together, using the software, etc. In other words, I don't yet know enough about it to know exactly what I'd want to do with it.

But I guess what I'd like to be able to do is to access and/or transfer files from one computer to another from either location, use my new printer (now hooked up to my XP machine) to print files from my older computer(s) and otherwise share peripherals. What other uses are there? The only thing I've left out is sharing an internet connection. And I've left that out because I would like to learn to do the other things first, before taking the next step (which would probably involve getting DSL).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,763 Posts
You could share a dial-up connection, not just broadband. Though you would have to use ICS to do this. I don't think there are any routers that accept input from a dial-up modem.

By the way, in most geographical locations, I don't think that DSL can hold a candle to cable broadband. For DSL at $20 per month I was measuring ftp downloads of 600 kilobits/second. For cable at $40/month I was measuring 11 megabits/second (11264 Kbits/sec) (divide these figures by 8 to convert to kilobytes/sec and megabytes/sec; multipy Mbits/sec by 1024 to get Kbits/sec). The figures I measured are 5/8 and 3/4 of advertised speeds. You can get high-speed DSL for $30, but it is only going to be 2.4 Mbits/sec. I don't have FIOS in my area yet. That should be comparable to cable, but they are charging more.

By the way, my DSL modem needed to be rebooted every few days. My cable modem seems to be rock steady. I haven't had to reboot it for a month yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by soilman View Post

By the way, in most geographical locations, I don't think that DSL can hold a candle to cable broadband. For DSL at $20 per month I was measuring ftp downloads of 600 kilobits/second. For cable at $40/month I was measuring 11 megabits/second (11264 Kbits/sec) (divide these figures by 8 to convert to kilobytes/sec and megabytes/sec; multipy Mbits/sec by 1024 to get Kbits/sec). The figures I measured are 5/8 and 3/4 of advertised speeds. You can get high-speed DSL for $30, but it is only going to be 2.4 Mbits/sec. I don't have FIOS in my area yet. That should be comparable to cable, but they are charging more.

By the way, my DSL modem needed to be rebooted every few days. My cable modem seems to be rock steady. I haven't had to reboot it for a month yet.
What you say is probably true, but, ironically, is one of the reasons I do not want a cable modem at this time. See, almost everyone follows the reasoning you've offered. Therefore almost everyone wants cable. But there is only one cable company in the area. And they treat their customers like crap. So if you get cable and everything runs fine, great. But if you get cable and ever have a problem, then you are basically screwed due to the lousy or non-existant customer service of the monopoly cable company. The local areas of internet forums are full of such complaints.

If I get DSL I can get it from Earthlink and keep my e-mail address(es). If Earthlink does not give good service, I can switch to several other DSL providers. True, many of these are "resellers" of the basic DSL offered by BellSouth, but at least there is competition.

I know a fellow who has DSL and the last I can recall he was telling me that he is (right now) getting throughput speeds that are comparable to cable.

He said this changed within the last year or so.

So I would probably be content to go with DSL if I decide to change.

But all this is putting the cart before the horse. I'd like to do one step at a time.

And it is seeming to me like just doing a hub at this point would be the best way to go, in terms of learning about networking and improving my setup.

It seems like the most I am risking if this judgment is wrong is the $30 cost of the wired hub, which might have to be replaced by a router at some future date.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,763 Posts
Joe
Quote:
If I get DSL I can get it from Earthlink and keep my e-mail address(es).
Best thing to do, I think, is to get your email addresses from someone who isn't selling internet connectivity - like gmail. Then you are free to play one internet provider against the other, without concern about changing your email address. Gmail has pop-smtp, although there is a minor bug in their smtp (an error message pops up, even tho there is no error).

Actually getting DSL is a good idea. Once you have DSL, you can call up the cable company and tell them how much you love DSL, and they may offer you a good, low-cost deal if switch over, throwing in free junk too, like maybe a router. Then after a few months you call up one of the DSL companies and let them offer you discounts, if you go back to them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,472 Posts
If all you want is file and printer sharing, any old hub or switch will do.

If you want to make things easier for you (and I think you do) get a router. This will give you a DHCP server. Having a dhcp server greatly simplifies the setup on each computer as you no longer need to manually enter static ips, subnet masks, and default gateways.

A router will also give you the oppurtunity to easily share internet with a broadband connection.

If you want a cheaper route you can get a switch, or even cheaper a hub. If you get this you will either need to setup your own DHCP server or enter manual static IP addresses.

Linksys and neatgear make decent home networking routers, switches, and hubs. After you pick one up let us know and we can guide you through the setup.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,763 Posts
bigdufstuff "This will give you a DHCP server. Having a dhcp server greatly simplifies the setup on each computer as you no longer need to manually enter static ips, subnet masks, and default gateways."

If I recall correctly, you don't need to enter statip ips numbers, etcetera, with Windows' built in peer to peer computing systems. Tho on older versions of windows, if you haven't updated them before MS stopped supporting them, they might not have all this built in. I'm talking like windows 98 rather than 98SE.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top