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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Take a look at the picture at <a href="http://www.hormel.com/kitchen/glossary.asp?id=36958" target="_blank">http://www.hormel.com/kitchen/glossary.asp?id=36958</a><br><br><br><br>
Is anyone familiar with this vegetable? How do I prepare it? I've read that if it's prepared wrong, it can cause an upset stomach. I also know that the skin can make for an itchy mouth experience, so it should be peeled. Am I right so far?<br><br><br><br>
I want to use it to make some canh chua (Vietnamese sour soup), but having read a little about it, I am concerned about preparing it correctly before I use it. Anybody ever used it? Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Oh well... It is an obscure vegetable and as far as I can tell, it's only used in sour soup. I was just hoping a member here might be familiar enough to give me some insight.
 

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Okay, when I was preparing the stalk, I called the Vietnamese place to see if I was doing it right. Basically, they told me to peel the green layer off and then boil it for about 5 minutes before adding it to the Vietnamese Sour Soup. I am a little suspicious that the stomach ache warning is not as serious as I imagined, since my friend ate some raw before I was able to tell him he shouldn't do that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just to clarify, no tummy aches occured. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Froggy,<br><br><br><br>
JIK you haven't searched on it yet, taro stem is one of those foods like rhubarb, chaya(tree-spinach), poke, and thorned berry leaves that are relatively high in oxylates, which are mildly toxic. They're alkaloid from what I understand, so I guess cooking allows the compound to react with something else and neutralize. I know that drying has the same affect on chaya, poke and berry leaves, but I don't know if it's a universal solution.<br><br><br><br>
How did you find the stalk? To me it's more of a texture thing with a mildly bitter taste - doesn't really float my boat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tofu-N-Sprouts</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
So it sounds like you figured out the Bac Ha just fine, but how was the sour soup? Are you posting a recipe any time soon?</div>
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I suppose I should. I'll have to set my mind to it, because measurements are the thing right now. (I can explain the process, but I have not got the amounts down pat -- except I can make a "soup to kill" (extremely sour/extremely hot) way too easily.)<br><br><br><br>
here's where i started from:<a href="http://fooddownunder.com/cgi-bin/recipe.cgi?r=38462" target="_blank">http://fooddownunder.com/cgi-bin/recipe.cgi?r=38462</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>nigel</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Froggy,<br><br><br><br>
JIK you haven't searched on it yet, taro stem is one of those foods like rhubarb, chaya(tree-spinach), poke, and thorned berry leaves that are relatively high in oxylates, which are mildly toxic. They're alkaloid from what I understand, so I guess cooking allows the compound to react with something else and neutralize. I know that drying has the same affect on chaya, poke and berry leaves, but I don't know if it's a universal solution.<br><br><br><br>
How did you find the stalk? To me it's more of a texture thing with a mildly bitter taste - doesn't really float my boat.</div>
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The stalk is sold raw (but cut and packaged) at <a href="http://www.talininc.com/" target="_blank">Talin Market World Food Fare</a> (an oriental market that offers other foods as well) in Albuquerque.<br><br><br><br>
My searches did not get me what I was looking for. Someone briefly mentioned peeling and boiling, but wasn't precise. The warnings about stomach aches were stern, but they did not say why. Seems like something you don't want to eat at all if you're susceptable to kidney stones. I have oxalate in my diet from greens anyway, but would never consume a rhubarb leaf. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">
 
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