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Yes.
 

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Oh, wow. i had no idea Lothar. thanks for the info! not that i steam anything but i did get an espresso maker thing recently and have been planning to steam.
 

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so, if you don't mind, can you explain a bit about it? i know B12 has colbamine something or other.
 

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<i>"I can resist anything but temptation."</i> Oscar Wilde<br><br><br><br>
Steaming B12 will destroy part of it, the longer the more gets destroyed. I remember a paper about an Indian family, who moved to Germany and used ultralong milk and overcooked theis milk and endet up with a B12 deficiency, as the milk was their primary source of B12.<br><br>
Back to CoolPercussion's question, shortly steaming the soy milk won't be a problem (or is it the one and only source for B12?).<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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vitamin B12 is actually QUITE heat stable as vitamins goes. my main concern would just be relying on supplemented soymilk as one's only source of B12.<br><br><br><br>
(re: the story above, i would first wonder if that family had a congenital issue with absorption.)
 

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No, they did well in India, where they also cooked their milk for al least 10 minutes. The reason is to avoid tuberculosis. But here in Germany they didn't do well with ultralong milk. As far as I remember they had an oral supplement afterwards. But I don't have the article anymore. I try to research it.<br><br>
Heat is destroying vitamin B12, longer heat exposure means more damage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Lothar M Kirsch</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
...<br><br>
Back to CoolPercussion's question, shortly steaming the soy milk won't be a problem (or is it the one and only source for B12?).<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
It's not my only source. Thanks for the info, everyone.
 

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So if I use nutritional yeast as part of my soup bases, does any of the B12 exist by the time I eat the soup?
 

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i always thought it was stable because of how bright yellow my pee was after consuming macaroni made with nutritional yeast in place of cheese.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Lothar M Kirsch</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><i>"I can resist anything but temptation."</i> Oscar Wilde<br><br><br><br>
Steaming B12 will destroy part of it, the longer the more gets destroyed. I remember a paper about an Indian family, who moved to Germany and used ultralong milk and overcooked theis milk and endet up with a B12 deficiency, as the milk was their primary source of B12.<br><br>
Back to CoolPercussion's question, shortly steaming the soy milk won't be a problem (or is it the one and only source for B12?).<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
</div>
<br>
What I'm curious about is what part of the molecule is vulnerable to heat. Is it the N's?
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>gaya</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
What I'm curious about is what part of the molecule is vulnerable to heat. Is it the N's?</div>
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vitamin B12 is HEAT STABLE. the major problem in destruction appears to be oxidation. i don't know if this is of C/N or the Co.<br><br><br><br>
here is a <a href="http://www.jbc.org/cgi/reprint/184/1/211" target="_blank">jbc paper</a>. see fig 1.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>catswym</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
vitamin B12 is HEAT STABLE. the major problem in destruction appears to be oxidation. i don't know if this is of C/N or the Co.<br><br><br><br>
here is a <a href="http://www.jbc.org/cgi/reprint/184/1/211" target="_blank">jbc paper</a>. see fig 1.</div>
</div>
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Figure one is very interesting! and that's good news.<br><br><br><br>
Maybe the Co but i haven't checked out the molecular structure. Eh, I need to review on how to read the periodic table. i have one on the wall in my office but bleh...so lazy.
 

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Apologies, catswym, vitamin B12 ranges as heat stable. Maybe overlong cooking promotes oxidation.<br><br>
And gaya, I was happy when I finished biochemistry. I'd guess the Co, too.<br><br>
CoolPrecussion: it seems to be more a scientific than a practical problem. Enjoy your soy milk!
 
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