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So my mother had gone through various medicines that had increased her levels of hormones. She has been a vegetarian for a long time and I'd like to help her find foods that she can eat which can improve her iron and protein intake.

Thank you~
 

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Iron: blackstrap molasses, beans, tofu and tempeh, leafy greens, seeds, cream of wheat, brown rice. Consume a source of vitamin c with iron rich plant food for greater absorption, and avoid caffeine and high calcium/dairy intake at the same meal.

Protein: beans (especially lentils and split peas), tempeh, tofu, seeds (pumpkin, chia, sunflower...), whole grains (brown rice, quinoa, millet, wild rice, spelt, bulgur, barley, oats...), green vegetables, legumes. Soy milk has a higher protein and iron content than other plant milks.

I don't understand the estrogen thing either. What does that have to do with iron and protein? Are you by chance refering to soy? Soy is a phytoestrogen, not the same thing as estrogen. There are many many plants that are phytoestrogens, not just soy. For example, flaxseeds and cabbage. I'd be more concerned with the animal estrogens and other hormones that are in dairy products and meat.
 

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@Naturebound--have you noticed this about molasses reading labels? I'm not a fan, only for ginger things, but noticed these two Plantation products differ a good bit:
this is their blackstrap


But this is their organic blackstrap:

The organic has only 8% calcium compared to a whopping 20% for the regular
 

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@Naturebound--have you noticed this about molasses reading labels? I'm not a fan, only for ginger things, but noticed these two Plantation products differ a good bit:
this is their blackstrap


But this is their organic blackstrap:

The organic has only 8% calcium compared to a whopping 20% for the regular
Yes, I have noticed differences in various products. I too use the Plantation brand with the higher iron/calcium content, more so for the calcium than iron but I like that benefit too. I always make sure it is "blackstrap", and always check labels. I wonder if it has something to do with thickness/concentration? I've noticed differences in thickness and mediciny taste with some molasses brands. Plantation does have a strong bitter kind of taste, but I have grown to like it.

I love to put molasses on my toast, or in my oatmeal or smoothies. I also make bbq sauce with it, and Asian types of sauces for stir fries with blackstrap molasses. And I use it to make my homemade breads and muffins. Ive even drizzled it on sauteed leafy greens and pineapple/tempeh for breakfast.
 

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Yeah, they're both blackstrap, only difference is the lower calcium being organic. I'd suspect the other way around> I find that kind of variance in other products, but that's a big difference!
I'm gonna email the company for an explanation

I like your suggestion of pineapple. I love grilled pineapple and can see it paired with a molasses ginger glaze.
My favorite smoothie is fresh pineapple, ginger, matcha some soy milk. I bet I could add some molasses to that!
 

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Yeah, they're both blackstrap, only difference is the lower calcium being organic. I'd suspect the other way around> I find that kind of variance in other products, but that's a big difference!
I'm gonna email the company for an explanation

I like your suggestion of pineapple. I love grilled pineapple and can see it paired with a molasses ginger glaze.
My favorite smoothie is fresh pineapple, ginger, matcha some soy milk. I bet I could add some molasses to that!
Please do share if you get a response back from them!

I find it irritating when there are such huge discrepancies in nutrition labels and ingredients on products, even from the same brand. I've also noticed this with servings. I once bought some vegan protein powder that said 1 scoop 110 calories. I bought it again a few months later and it said 2 scoops 110 calories lol. Or I have found some foods to have different nutrition labels on the package than on the website.

I used to be obsessed with calorie content when I was really sick. I wanted to eat oat bran, but I couldn't bring myself to, because there was no consistent calorie amount. It varies widely from nutrition site to site and brand to brand. Bob's Red Mill always seems to have a higher calorie/nutrition content listed than other brands or generic bulk labels. I read once where they count the fiber that is not absorbed by the body or something like that, where other companies calculate that out of the equation. Maybe something to do with weight of the food too. Really, when you think about it, how in the world can there truly be an exact percentage or number regarding the nutrition that is in any given food. There are just so many variables.
 

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Please do share if you get a response back from them!

I find it irritating when there are such huge discrepancies in nutrition labels and ingredients on products, even from the same brand. I've also noticed this with servings. I once bought some vegan protein powder that said 1 scoop 110 calories. I bought it again a few months later and it said 2 scoops 110 calories lol. Or I have found some foods to have different nutrition labels on the package than on the website.

I used to be obsessed with calorie content when I was really sick. I wanted to eat oat bran, but I couldn't bring myself to, because there was no consistent calorie amount. It varies widely from nutrition site to site and brand to brand. Bob's Red Mill always seems to have a higher calorie/nutrition content listed than other brands or generic bulk labels. I read once where they count the fiber that is not absorbed by the body or something like that, where other companies calculate that out of the equation. Maybe something to do with weight of the food too. Really, when you think about it, how in the world can there truly be an exact percentage or number regarding the nutrition that is in any given food. There are just so many variables.
I do graphic design for food packaging, and I come across this all the time. In Canada, the CFIA heavily regulates the way food products can be marketed and labelled, so it is a lot more precise. For example, companies are required by law to have a third party lab test and provide nutritional content for their labelling so that there is no bias.

Unfortunately, in the U.S., the guidelines are more lax. For example, product names are allowed to be misleading, ingredients can be disguised under unrecognizable names, and don't even have to be listed below a certain percentage, and companies are not required to use a third party lab, so sometimes the "facts" can be quite skewed. In addition, many values are rounded to the nearest 1 or 5 numeral, so it's not always as accurate as they'd like you to believe. I've also had companies "borrow" nutritional values from other companies' similar products, so I would use those "facts" as a guideline only, not as gospel ^_^

Additionally, we should keep in mind that the percentage of daily values listed on NFTs are based on a 2000-calorie a day diet, which some people don't even come close to, so instead of noting the percentages, note the grams/mg instead ^_^
 

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There is another brand that has the organic blackstrap as that much higher in calcium and the regular blackstrap that much lower, with iron the opposite way
While I can find arguments on line about soil conditions and other such variences, nothing that would relate to the difference in organic vs conventional.
I can't even find contact info for them

And the % is for RDA not of daily caloric values
 

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There is another brand that has the organic blackstrap as that much higher in calcium and the regular blackstrap that much lower, with iron the opposite way
While I can find arguments on line about soil conditions and other such variences, nothing that would relate to the difference in organic vs conventional.
I can't even find contact info for them

And the % is for RDA not of daily caloric values
of course, but it's still an estimate based on an average, which may not be applicable for a lot of people - for example, the RDA for protein will vary widely depending on a person's age/weight/activity level, so it is still better to know your own personal needs and look at the grams/mcg rather than rely on the percentages on NFTs ^_^
 
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