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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My fav. garden project is spiking the avocado pits I remove and putting them in water and letting them grow into houseplants. I've never had one get more than a few feet tall. Anyone have any success with growing something bigger?
 

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Meanwhile I found this...<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.crfg.org/tidbits/AvocadoFromSeed.html" target="_blank">http://www.crfg.org/tidbits/AvocadoFromSeed.html</a><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Indoors, avocado plants are often gangly and sparse with leaves. One reason for the plant's gawky appearance indoors is light. Lack of sufficient light causes stems to stretch for it. Another reason is that avocados shed many buds along their stems, buds that might have might have grown into side branches. The result is a plant stretching out for light, sending out new growth mostly from the tips of the branches and shedding old leaves.</div>
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dawngirl,<br><br><br><br>
can you tell me how you do the spike thing with the avocadoes? I have NEVER been succesful with this.<br><br><br><br>
Also, for anyone that can help....I live in an apartment, but I have a very sizeable yard and would like to plant an avocado tree in a huge tree pot so I can move it when I move to a new place. Would it even be possible for it to bear fruit without the roots being able to go deeper? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I take three toothpicks, and put them into the pit flesh up near the top - sticking out perpendicularly so the pit can be supported over the rim of a glass. I fill the glass with enough water to feed the base of the pit, and voila, in a little bit the pit splits and grows. I've dried them first and taken them straight from the avocado - both ways they've grown. I just don't have a warm enough climate year round to keep them going so I let them go as leggy house plants for a while.<br><br><br><br>
Someone else may be able to help us both get one to grow bigger. Oatmeal says light is key too.
 

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Thank you! Luckily I live in California, so warmth won't be a problem. How do I know where the "top" of it is? Do you use any special soil for the avocado tree? How often should it be watered? I tend to kill plants by over watering or under watering or using the wrong soil. LOL. I'm learning though.
 

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Look what I found:<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.diynet.com/DIY/article/0,2058,511,00.html" target="_blank">http://www.diynet.com/DIY/article/0,2058,511,00.html</a><br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Another thing:<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Herself</i><br><br><b>Would it even be possible for it to bear fruit without the roots being able to go deeper?</b></div>
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If you want to grow avocados (the fruit), this will not work with a pit out of a grocery avocado. Those trees are highly likely turn out different from the original tree, and so is the fruit (if there will be any). Plus, even if it would be identical to the mother plant, an avocado tree takes like 15 years before it bears fruit.<br><br><br><br>
Avocado trees (much like apple trees, banana trees, etc.) are propagated through cloning (cuttings). When breeders develop or discover a good variety, that single mother plant is duplicated (cloned) all over the planet.<br><br><br><br>
Some of the most popular fruit varieties were created by pure chance. Such as Granny Smith apples (discovered in the backyard of, well, Granny Smith) and Haas avocados (a chance seedling in the garden of Rudolf Haas, a postman).<br><br><br><br>
So, to reliably grow fruit, you will have to purchase avocado fruit trees from a nursery carrying or specializing in avocado trees. It's no big deal, I don't think they are very expensive. Plus, you can buy dwarf varieties that bear fruit twice a year and grow well in containers.<br><br><br><br>
Hope to help! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Why am I posting in this thread all the time? Oh, um yes it's because I love fruit <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":love:"><br><br><br><br>
I just ate a medium, slightly underripe California Haas avocado. It was not yet creamy, but slightly sweet. I could not wait until it ripens fully.... What a fruit! Now I'm in heaven! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/drool.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":drool:"><br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
YUMMYYYY, breakfast for me was 1/2 smashed ripe avocado on sprouted grain bread.<br><br><br><br>
Oatmeal, you know your stuff on gardening...<br><br><br><br>
*tucks away info for future use*
 

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I had an avocado sandwich for breakfast also. Heaven! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"> (I ate the whole avocado, though.)
 

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High light plants (fruiting plants etc) require about 45 - 60 W / sqft. Low light plants (herbs, leafy greens) get by with 20 - 30 W / sqft.<br><br><br><br>
I'd start out with a 400W growlight and see how the plant is doing.
 

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I was in the garden shop today and saw avocado trees for $20!<br><br><br><br>
The variety was "Fuerte" (yum!) and the trees were semi-dwarf. Which means they grow to 20-25'. Heh, probably still not optimal for containers.... Though they said you can trim it to desired shape and size. Dwarf varieties might be a bit more expesive beacuse they are more specialized, but I have no idea.<br><br><br><br>
The label said either full or partial sun, it even mentioned that if it's very hot, you should protect the branches with whitewash. So obviously they need a lot of sun, but are not extreme sun lovers. It did not mention when the trees begin to bear fruit after they are planted though. Might be immediately, might be a couple of years.<br><br><br><br>
Just thought I post this info here <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Thank you so much for all your wisdom Oatmeal. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> This helped me out a lot!
 

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so...do you realize what you are implying, oatmeal? do you KNOW that you are getting my hopes up for having avocados at my convenience - organic, at that?<br><br><br><br>
is this true? especially in my southeastern michigan climate?<br><br>
(please say, "yes"...)
 
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