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http://www.news.com.au/common/story_...%5E421,00.html

Australia primed to be yanked into US

By Tess Livingstone

July 16, 2003

AUSTRALIA has been urged to seriously consider becoming the 51st state of the US.

And American-born historian Dr David Mosler told a Brisbane audience yesterday there was a 20 per cent chance of Australia becoming an American state in the next 50 years.

The visiting research fellow at Adelaide University, who has lived in Australia since 1971, said the chances would increase significantly in the event of a major Al-Qaeda attack on Australia or if Indonesia became a fundamentalist Islamic republic.

Dr Mosler told the 2003 Fulbright Symposium at Griffith University yesterday that he decided Australia was "an unreformable society" after the loss of the 1999 republic referendum.

Australians, he said, had no flag of their own; a weak sense of nationhood; no prime minister in the Lodge, with John Howard living in Sydney; no national bushfire or water plans, even with the worst drought in history; and no "broad knowledge of nation in public discourse or popular culture". Australians had replaced "Empire with Yanks" after 1942, and the country retained a "quasi-colonial status".

He said Australian governments, attuned to the British, Americans, Japanese and global capital markets, had "sold off the farm" - electricity, water, ports, airports, resources - while Australians weren't offended by such "treasonous behaviour".

He said Australia's passage to American statehood would not be difficult under its Constitution.

He listed the advantages of American statehood for Australia as:

* Access to the world's best higher education system.

* Large savings on embassies.

* Being part of the world's most effective defence system.

* Merger with the world's strongest currency.

* Being part of the world's biggest economy.

* A constitution bringing a republic and a Bill of Rights.

* Fielding teams in the US national basketball, baseball and gridiron competitions.

The Courier-Mail
 

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As an Australian, I think this guy is a complete wanker and I would love to meet him in a dark alley and let him know what I think of his "weak sense of nationhood".

Just because we're easy-going doesn't mean we don't have a strong sense of national identity. And the reason we didn't become a republic was because of our evil PMs canny two-pronged question...

Instead of "Should Australia become a republic?" which the majority would vote YES to it was

"Should Australia become a republic and should the president be elected in this fashion blah blah.." the latter half of the question the majority of the republicans disagreed with.

Ooooh, I'm SO MAD now....
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by stonecrest

Australians, he said, had no flag of their own; a weak sense of nationhood; no prime minister in the Lodge, with John Howard living in Sydney; no national bushfire or water plans, even with the worst drought in history; and no "broad knowledge of nation in public discourse or popular culture". Australians had replaced "Empire with Yanks" after 1942, and the country retained a "quasi-colonial status".
FURTHERMORE!

We have a flag. It is outdated, and should be changed slightly. Yet the Southern Cross (white) is undeniably Australia. As is the 7 pointed star. We can't stand our PM, so we don't care where he lives. I already addressed nationhood. (Also, we have a very strong sense of statehood). We have STATE bushfire and water plans, as our states are generally so large. No knowledge of nation is a sign of our apathy. We don't look to the past. Our icons are criminals. We like it like that.

Quote:
He said Australian governments, attuned to the British, Americans, Japanese and global capital markets, had "sold off the farm" - electricity, water, ports, airports, resources - while Australians weren't offended by such "treasonous behaviour".
Ask an Australian. We are incredibly angered that our pathetic government keeps selling Australia off. There's not much we can do about it once they're in power though. And with the perceived lack of options, there's even less people think they can do about it.

Quote:
He said Australia's passage to American statehood would not be difficult under its Constitution.

He listed the advantages of American statehood for Australia as:

* Access to the world's best higher education system.
No offense, but only the Americans believe that. It's much easier to gain masters or PhD qualifications in America than the UK or Australia. Our education system is much harsher.

<snip bits I don't care about>

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* Being part of the world's most effective defence system.
Wouldn't need to be if we didn't keep siding with the US over our nearest neighbours.

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* Merger with the world's strongest currency.
Only economists care about that.

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* Being part of the world's biggest economy.
See above comment.

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* A constitution bringing a republic and a Bill of Rights.
Don't see how that would benefit us. We have most of those rights in practice, and indeed we are more free to speak than Americans. We don't get labelled "unAustralian" if we disagree with our incompetent government. We are a republic in our hearts. If the stupid govt had worded the question correctly (but they are monarchists, so of course they wanted to word it badly) we would be a republic now...

Quote:
* Fielding teams in the US national basketball, baseball and gridiron competitions.
LOL Who cares? We have our own sports. We aren't particularly interested in these sports. The US can have them. Give me cricket anyday....

p.s. This is not intended as an attack on America just purely an attack on a stupid idea.... Australia is very different to America and it should stay that way.
 

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No, you probably don't. But if you play your cards right, we may accept you as a territory. You can work your way up to statehood in the fullness of time.


Good onya Shewolf. I agree entirely.
 

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Yay Shewolf!!!

Actually - in regards to the whole convict thig - there is evidence to suggest we were 'colonised' as a military outpost rather than a convict settlement.

BTW why is it that Americans seem to FORGET that they too were a Penal Colony?

That dood can get fooked. Like we need or even want to be a part of his cesspool
.
 

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I meant our icons like Ned Kelly were criminals... LOL

Yeah, it's funny that they forget that... but remember, we didn't fight a war to become independent... but I'd fight a war to stay Australia...
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by stonecrest



He listed the advantages of American statehood for Australia as:

* Access to the world's best higher education system.


http://adulteducation.smartlibrary.i...m?segment=2694

According to the International Adult Study of Literacy (IALS), U.S. adults demonstrate a mediocre level of literacy skills. Scholars Andrew Sum, Irwin Kirsch, and Robert Taggart compare U.S. literacy skills as measured by the IALS test to the scores of adults from 20 high-income countries (some countries include multiple languages). These countries include:

Australia

Belgium (Flemish)

Canada (English and French)

Denmark

Finland

France

Germany

Great Britain

Ireland

Italy

Netherlands

New Zealand

Northern Ireland

Norway

Sweden

Switzerland (French, German, and Italian)

Quote:
* Large savings on embassies.
WTF? this is too stupid to even defend

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* Being part of the world's most effective defence system.
Should read most aggressive and paranoid . Thanks but no thanks.

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* Merger with the world's strongest currency.
Debatable - esp. given that the economy is false and unfairly dependant on the US dollar.

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* Being part of the world's biggest economy.
Sorry? What about Europe? I'd rather live in our poor economy where education is free and University is attainable for ALL Australians.

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* A constitution bringing a republic and a Bill of Rights.
And be stuck with the mindless litigation that occurs in the US? No thanks.

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* Fielding teams in the US national basketball, baseball and gridiron competitions.
The US already thinks they have "World Series" sport so what is the big deal?

Seriously though I wonder how many people booed him?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by thefragile77

http://adulteducation.smartlibrary.i...m?segment=2694

According to the International Adult Study of Literacy (IALS), U.S. adults demonstrate a mediocre level of literacy skills. Scholars Andrew Sum, Irwin Kirsch, and Robert Taggart compare U.S. literacy skills as measured by the IALS test to the scores of adults from 20 high-income countries (some countries include multiple languages). These countries include:

Australia

Belgium (Flemish)

Canada (English and French)

Denmark

Finland

France

Germany

Great Britain

Ireland

Italy

Netherlands

New Zealand

Northern Ireland

Norway

Sweden

Switzerland (French, German, and Italian)

WTF? this is too stupid to even defend

Should read most aggressive and paranoid . Thanks but no thanks.

Debatable - esp. given that the economy is false and unfairly dependant on the US dollar.

Sorry? What about Europe? I'd rather live in our poor economy where education is free and University is attainable for ALL Australians.

And be stuck with the mindless litigation that occurs in the US? No thanks.

The US already thinks they have "World Series" sport so what is the big deal?

Seriously though I wonder how many people booed him?
Watch it. I can get nitpicky about your country too, okay?

Oh, and as far as the higher education stat...literacy would be part of elementary education, not higher ed. I could also argue the legitimacy of literacy stats, but I won't go there.
 
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