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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Arugula is not something I would regularly find in my supermarket, or if I would it would not be the freshest arugula one could imagine, so because I knew it was an event that was irregular, when a few days ago I noticed fresh arugula, I could not help but think that it would be best to buy some and bring it home and eat it, then, because I might not soon have another chance to do so, again.<br><br><br><br>
However I am without a recipe in which to use arugula and a whole bunch of arugula leaves eaten plain does not sound too appetizing. I would therefore appreciate any recipes anyone has that will enable me to use up my arugula in various ways, and consume it all, without my appetitefor arugula becoming withered by monotony.<br><br><br><br>
I am going to try it in a salad first, with romaine leaves and whatever I can find in my refrigerator.<br><br><br><br>
Then I need more recipes. Please. You can only eat plain arugula leaves for so long, I think, before they start to taste -- wrong.
 

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Found this on Recipe Source (<a href="http://www.recipesource.com" target="_blank">http://www.recipesource.com</a>). It sounds good!<br><br><br><br>
SPAGHETTI WITH TOMATOES & ARUGULA<br><br><br><br>
1 lb Spaghetti<br><br>
2 cups Arugula, chopped<br><br>
6 Shallots, chopped -ÿÿ<br><br>
4 Garlic cloves, chopped<br><br>
2 tb Olive oil<br><br>
2 cups Tomatoes, chopped<br><br>
Salt<br><br>
Red pepper flakes<br><br>
Cayenne, to taste<br><br><br><br>
Cook the pasta until almost *al dente*; add the arugula, cook for a few moments & then drain.<br><br><br><br>
Meanwhile, lightly saute the shallots or garlic in the olive oil. Add the tomatoes. Cook over high heat until the sauce thickens, then season with the salt & hot pepper flakes or cayenne. Toss the pasta & arugula with the tomato sauce & serve immediately.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That looks kind of interesting, misanthropy. I think I'll try that next. Except I'll drain the pasta first, then add chopped arugula. Otherwise all the micronutrients from the arugula will go into the water that you are cooking the pasta in, and then down the drain when you pour it down the drain.<br><br><br><br>
I made my usual potage parmentier (potato-onion soup) with arugula instead of the parsley or cilantro I usually use, and found that unlike parsley and cilantro, which maintain their distinctive taste and add charcter to the soup, when just cooked in for about a minute, cooking arugula for a minute kind of kills off its distinctive taste -- unless I just ate so much in my salad that I can't taste it any more in the soop. ????
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No, I ate some more salad, and was instantly struck by the distinctive taste of the smattering of arugula in it. the soup had about twice as much arugula per bowlful -- but I couldn't taste it in the soup.<br><br><br><br>
They should call it a-raw-gula. I'm gonna put cilantro in my next bowlful of soup.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by soilman</i><br><br><b>However I am without a recipe in which to use arugula and a whole bunch of arugula leaves eaten plain does not sound too appetizing. I would therefore appreciate any recipes anyone has that will enable me to use up my arugula in various ways, and consume it all, without my appetitefor arugula becoming withered by monotony.<br><br><br><br></b></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Visit my website.<br><br><br><br>
Visit the recipes section.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://nashville.earthsave.org/#SEC3" target="_blank">http://nashville.earthsave.org/#SEC3</a><br><br><br><br>
Now, scroll down to the Searchable Recipe Databases subsection.<br><br><br><br>
Over 145,000 recipes are covered in searchable databases.<br><br><br><br>
Visit each one in turn and just plug in "arugula" as the search term.<br><br><br><br>
You will find numerous recipes. No, they are not all vegan. You will have to use your brain to adapt the non-vegan recipes or move on to the next one(s).<br><br><br><br>
This section of the website was designed specifically to deal with the kind of problem you have posed--"How do I cook or prepare ingredient X?"<br><br><br><br>
Good luck and best wishes.<br><br><br><br>
Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hahaha. Searched Veggies Unite. "13,641 [recipes] searched." Only 6 of them contained arugula. I guess arugula is not the most widely used vegetable.<br><br><br><br>
3 of the recipes included mushrooms, which I don't eat, as a major ingredient. #4 said, more or less, make hummus and chop up whatever greens you have on hand and put them in your sandwhich along with the hummus. Then it gave a list of greens, including, optionally, arugula. #5 was pretty much the romaine salad that I already described above. And finally, the 6th recipe called for an exotic ingredient that is unavailable to me.<br><br><br><br>
I am going to try adding chopped up arugula to my next hummus sandwhich, or even chop up raw arugula and add it to the hummus. But the recipe didn't sound very sure about this. It was basically just said chop up some greens, and then gave examples of greens that exist, including arugula, but it didn't specifically recommend arugula, and implied that the author might not have even tried that specific green.<br><br>
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ooo, I found one that sounds simple and good, the arugula is used raw, the ingredients are easily available (except of course for the arugula itself, which I probably will not see again for years) and can be adapted to veganity.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.italianfoodforever.com/recipes/driedpasta/farfallearugula.php" target="_blank">http://www.italianfoodforever.com/re...llearugula.php</a><br><br><br><br>
Replace the chicken broth with boiled-down chik-pea cooking water. Leave out the parmesan cheese, or try replacing with a tiny amount of sesame tahini, or blanced almond butter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Arugula seed has been used as an ingredient in aphrodisiac concoctions dating back to the first century, AD. (Cambridge World History of Food).<br><br><br><br>
Part of a typical Roman meal was to offer a salad of greens, frequently Arugula ( spelled Arugola), romaine, chicory, mallow and lavender and seasoned with a "cheese sauce for lettuce"<br><br><br><br>
from <a href="http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/arugula.htm" target="_blank">http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/arugula.htm</a><br><br><br><br>
Hmm. I just ate a bunch of leaves; no seeds. So probably no harm will come to me.
 

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I've been growing it for two summers. It's <i>very</i> easy to grow and I always end up with much more than I can handle, for some reason.<br><br><br><br>
I throw it in with other greens to make tossed salad. I also throw it in into the steamer with veggies like cauliflower or young freshly picked wax beans.<br><br><br><br>
It definitely has a very distinctive taste.
 

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I love Arugula! I wish they would stock it more often in my local supermarket. The following is my favorite Arugula salad. First, I soak the leaves in lemon juice and cold water, then I rinse it several times because it's grown in such sandy soil.<br><br>
I thinly chop a fennel bulb<br><br>
peel and cut up two blood red oranges,<br><br>
chop about 1/4 cup of salt cured green and black olives,<br><br>
put those three items in a bowl and add 1 finely diced clove of garlic, the juice of one lemon, about 1/8 cup of extra virgin olive oil, a splash of balsamic vinager, and a dash of sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. I let those items rest for ten minutes<br><br>
and the pour it over a bed of arugula. sometimes I garnish with fresh tomatoes, but they have to be really fresh. I also use the wispy fennel leaves as a garnish. Try it after eating pasta or something, it's so refreshing to the palate and excellent for digestion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sound good Baby. I think I'm going to try it. But a salad with just fennel and arugula, for the raw vegetables, would't be something you could eat a huge amount of -- so I'll still have plenty of arugula left for other recipes.<br><br><br><br>
What is the purpose though, of soaking the leaves in lemon juice, instead of just plain cold water?
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by soilman</i><br><br><b>What is the purpose though, of soaking the leaves in lemon juice, instead of just plain cold water?</b></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Taste or that vitamin C makes some minerals better absorbed by the body ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
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Taste or that vitamin C makes some minerals better absorbed by the body ?<br><br>
===============<br><br><br><br>
I don't see how it could affect the taste or add vitamin c or help the arugula retain its own vitamin c -- if you are subsequently going to "rinse it several times."
 

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How much Arugula did you buy???<br><br>
I soak all my veggies in cold water and lemon juice, it retards oxidization, helps brake down waxes and chemicals on the the veggie surface, and leaves a faint taste that supports and heightens many of the more subtle flavours of fruits and veggies.<br><br><br><br>
I'm sure I don't have to tell you Soilman, how arugula soon begins to wilt as soon as you brake off the roots. Do you store it in your fridge with the roots in water?<br><br><br><br>
Have you ever made arugula pesto? Just substitute the basil with Arugula. Yummy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ok, I made my adapatation of the recipe at <a href="http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/arugula.htm." target="_blank">http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/arugula.htm.</a><br><br><br><br>
Basicly I quartered the ingredient list and used sesame oil instead of olive oil because I prefer it with pasta.<br><br><br><br>
I got out my mortar and pestle and pulverized 2 tsp of pine nuts into pine-nut butter. They are very oily, and became an oily paste even before the particles got very small -- unlike peanuts or almonds which will grind to a powder first, and then require more grinding, before they are a paste. The 2 tsp turned into a very small amount of pine-nut paste; next time I will use more pine nuts.<br><br><br><br>
I cooked up about 2 small handfuls of "penne" pasta: one handful of ordinary durum wheat semolina, and the other of whole-grain durum wheat, in water with salt. Drained it.<br><br><br><br>
To the drained pasta I added a teaspoon of sesame oil (not the toasted kind, but the "minimally refined" kind, Loriva), and a couple tablespoons of concentrated chikpea water (I am going way over the recommended amount of chikpea water that would be calculated by quartering the recipe -- that would be only one tablespoon), about 5 small cherry tomatoes cut in half, garlic powder, tobasco sauce, a tiny bit of salt (the pasta was already salty from being cooked in salted water), and freshly ground black pepper. Cooked for about a minute.<br><br><br><br>
I chopped up enough arugula (1.5 cups or so) to make about 2/3 of a cup of very finely chopped arugula, using a chef's knife and a cutting board. If, when comparing times, you include cleanup, this takes way less time then using a food processor, which I don't own anyway.<br><br><br><br>
I added the raw chopped arugula as soon as I pulled the pot off of the heat, and a tsp of sesame oil, and the pine-nut paste, a tsp of whole pine nuts, and a tiny bit of sesame tahini. This resulted in a "sauce" that was way too thick so I added even <b>more</b> concentrated chikpea water.<br><br><br><br>
I wasn't too happy with the result. The combined sesame oil and sesame tahini, overpowered the pinenut flavor.<br><br><br><br>
Next time I am going to try plain olive oil (not extra virgin) and leave out the sesame tahini, and pulverize a slightly larger amount of pine nuts and leave out the whole pine nuts. Also, I may wait til the pasta cools before adding the arugula, as it wilted when added to the hot pasta, and lost most of its flavor and character as a result, even tho it wasn't even cooked thru. I'm convinced I have no interest in cooked arugula. I might leave out the chikpea water too, as it was 2 competing flavors, the "chickpea-chicken-like flavor" and the arugula. I felt they competed rather than combined. The pinenuts competed with the sesame tahini too. The whole thing was just way too richly-flavored. Glad I only made a small portion. I going to go for cold pasta with cold arugula next, with any additional ingredient less complex, less strong flavored. And more arugula and less pasta, with the arugula less finely chopped, and <b>raw</b> cherry tomatoes or diced plum tomato, and more of a "dressing" over it rather than a sauce. I am thinking of a simple pine-nut butter and oil and water dressing. With a bit of garlic and tobasco.
 

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Here is my Arugula Pesto Recipe.<br><br>
2 bunches of arugula, stemmed<br><br>
4 gralic gloves<br><br>
1/2 cup pine nuts (I toast mine)<br><br>
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil<br><br>
Water as needed (about a half cup)<br><br>
1/2 teaspoon sea salt<br><br>
freshly ground pepper<br><br>
1 teaspoon capers ground<br><br><br><br>
In a blender, (Soilman, I'm sure you could work around this with your mortar and pestle, perhaps also using a whisk) I combined the arugula, garlic, and pinenuts.<br><br>
Leaving the blender running I drizzle the olive oil and enough water to make a paste. Then I add salt, peppers and capers.<br><br>
I cook 3/4 pound of dry penne or rigatoni. I just don't like stringed pasta, like spaghgetti, for some reason.<br><br>
mix it all together and eat what I can.<br><br>
I'll use the leftovers in salads over the next couple of days.<br><br>
You could add variations like sauteed peppers, chopped tomatoes, or a little lemon zest. The lemon zest is especially good when you eat it cold.<br><br>
I wouldn't get to fancy with arugula recipes because even though arugula has a wonderfully strong pepper flavor, it is after all still a delicate lettuce.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Sounds really simple and good Baby.<br><br><br><br>
I don't have a food processor, but I have a good blender.<br><br><br><br>
Why it sounds good to me: It sounds like it will taste good. It doesn't require an excessive and dangerous amount of olive oil. In involves no frying or super-heating of the oil. It calls for extra-virgin olive oil, which I would think has more micronutrients than typically-refined olive oil. The extra virgin olive oil may not be too strong-flavored in this recipe, as it might be in some other recipes. The arugula is raw. I like that.<br><br><br><br>
Gonna try it just as soon as I get back from shopping. I might even buy garlic cloves instead of using garlic powder.<br><br><br><br>
I usually don't buy garlic cloves because they are not only more expensive per flavor-amount than powder, but they usually start to deteriorate, before I get to use all of the cloves in one bulb. (Onions seem to last much longer.)<br><br><br><br>
Garlic powder costs me about $1.79 for about 9 ounces, lists the only ingredient as being garlic, tastes the same in some recipes (recipes that involve cooking) but not in others, and is equivalent to, I estimate, 50 garlic bulbs. One small garlic bulb costs me about $0.75.<br><br><br><br>
But I think this recipe calls for real garlic cloves.<br><br><br><br>
By "a bunch" of arugula -- do you mean the 5 or 7 or so leaves that are attached to one root?<br><br><br><br>
I can't tell if my pine-nuts are already toasted or not. The package label doesn't address the subject. At least, not that I remember. I think I tossed it when I put my pine nuts in a sturdier container.<br><br><br><br>
By the way, I am having trouble controlling my desire to eat the pine nuts, all by themselves -- to just grab pinenuts and eat them. As I matured, I learned to control my desire to just grab women, and kiss them. When I was about 8 years old, and in second grade, I began learning that there could be problems associated with doing that. And eventually I learned to control my impulses. Now I do it almost without thinking about it. Err, I mean control my impulses to just grab women and kiss them. But pine nuts are different.<br><br><br><br>
I have to keep reminding myself, over and over, every time the thought occurs to me, of grabbing a handful of pine nuts, how important it is to have green leafy veggies in my diet, as well as oily seeds. I know that mixing the seeds and the leafies helps insure that I eat more leafies. So it is important to be able to conserve my pine nuts long enough to be able to still have them, when I need them, for mixing with arugula.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Oh. I've never seen "ground" capers. All i recall seeing in my supermarket is whole capers in brine or vinegar or something. I think these would be soft. And I don't know how to "grind" something that is soft. So I am a little puzzled about to how to get the capers into the food.
 
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