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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<a href="http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070410113836.htm" target="_blank">http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0410113836.htm</a><br><br>
^^^ complete article ^^^<br><br><br><br>
Science Daily Got milk? Weightlifters will want to raise a glass after a new study found that milk protein is significantly better than soy at building muscle mass.<br><br>
The study, conducted by a team of researchers at McMaster University's Department of Kinesiology, was recently published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. It compared how much muscle protein young men gained after completing a heavy weight workout followed by consumption of equivalent amounts of protein as either fluid skim milk or a soy drink.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Funding for the study was made possible by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the <b>US National Dairy Council</b>.</div>
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Would the dairy council have been able to influence the study in any way? 'Twice the muscle gain' seems like a result they just pulled out of their ass.
 

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Being that bovine milk was intended for calves, and 75% of the worlds population are lactose intolerant (diarrhea being only one of the symptom).<br><br>
What is this study really telling us?
 

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This is a flawed study, because you cannot compare two foods with entirely different nutritional profiles.<br><br><br><br>
What kind of soy drink did they have the weight lifters drinking? Was it a fat free, sugar-free product with an equivilant fat/carb/protein ratio? Was the soy drink enriched with calcium and B12? Does the soy product contain sugar?<br><br><br><br>
And of course, as always, most importantly, who paid for the study? The researchers admitted that they had a bias that milk would be "better" before they even went into the study.
 

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Would love see a more unbiased study...Too bad dairy is such an emotional food that you never know what to beleive.
 

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Ahem, how do you know the study is flawed without having read it? They explicitly mention that soy is a high quality protein. And no, I don't consume milk. You can find it here: <a href="http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/85/4/1031" target="_blank">http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/85/4/1031</a><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Objective:We examined the effect of consuming isonitrogenous, isoenergetic, and macronutrient-matched soy or milk beverages (18 g protein, 750 kJ) on protein kinetics and net muscle protein balance after resistance exercise in healthy young men. Our hypothesis was that soy ingestion would result in larger but transient hyperaminoacidemia compared with milk and that milk would promote a greater net balance because of lower but prolonged hyperaminoacidemia.</div>
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<br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">The subjects then ingested (in a randomized single-blinded fashion) a 500-mL drink that contained either fluid nonfat milk or an isonitrogenous, isoenergetic, and macronutrient-matched soy-protein beverage (745 kJ, 18.2 g protein, 1.5 g fat, and 23 g carbohydrate as lactose for milk and as maltodextrin for the soy beverage). The drinks were made from commercially available isolated soy protein (GeniSoy, Fairfield, CA) or skim milk powder.</div>
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<div class="quote-block">We propose that the rapid digestion of soy protein, and therefore the faster and greater increase in delivery of amino acids from the gut to the liver, may have resulted in an increased utilization of these amino acids for the synthesis of serum proteins and urea, as seen by Bos et al (32), rather than for muscle protein synthesis.</div>
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I didn't anything glaringly wrong with the design when I skimmed the paper, but I wonder if there could be something hormonal going on with the cow's milk.
 
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