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<a href="http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99993966" target="_blank">http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99993966</a><br><br>
A vegetarian "ape-diet", based on the foods our simian cousins eat, is as effective in lowering cholesterol as an established cholesterol-lowering drug, reveals a new study. High cholesterol levels increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.<br><br><br><br>
The key components of the ape diet are plant sterols, found in plant oils and enriched margarines, viscous fibre, found in oats, barley and aubergine, and soy protein and nuts.<br><br><br><br>
People with raised cholesterol following this primitive diet had their levels of bad cholesterol slashed by about a third - the same reduction provided by the statin drug, lovastatin.<br><br><br><br>
Study leader David Jenkins, a vascular biologist at the University of Toronto, says these foods are accepted to have cholesterol-lowering properties. "The thing we did was to put them all together and see that they didn't cancel out but actually added up," he told New Scientist.<br><br><br><br>
He believes that humans may be evolutionarily adapted to the diet, which is similar to that eaten by gorillas and orangutans.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Tofu bake<br><br><br><br>
Jenkins and colleagues assigned 46 patients to either the special ape diet, a standard cholesterol-lowering diet or the standard diet plus lovastatin.<br><br><br><br>
A typical dinner from the ape menu would be tofu bake with ratatouille of aubergine, onions and sweet peppers, with pearled barley and vegetable side dishes, says the team.<br><br><br><br>
After four-weeks, levels of the harmful LDL-cholesterol plummeted by 29 per cent on the ape diet, and 31 per cent for those on lovastatin. Bad cholesterol fell by only 8 per cent for those on the standard low-fat diet.<br><br><br><br>
Jenkins points out many people with raised cholesterol are being put on medication before they give diet a chance. "Although many drugs are extremely safe, there's always a slight chance of risk of the drug and drug interactions," he says.<br><br><br><br>
Lovastatin has an "excellent" safety profile, but the drug can cause liver or muscle enzyme problems in a small minority of people.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Filet mignon<br><br><br><br>
The drug is reasonably cheap now it has come off patent, says Jenkins. But the cost of the ape-diet will depend on people's individual tastes. It might seem dear to those who like fast food. "But if you like filet mignon and West Coast salmon then this is not going to be more expensive - it's going to be cheaper," he says.<br><br><br><br>
\t \t<br><br>
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David Jenkins, University of Toronto<br><br><br><br>
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Journal of the American Medical Association<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
The patients generally found the ape diet acceptable, with the main complaint being the large quantity of food that had to be eaten in order not to lose weight.<br><br><br><br>
However, the British Heart Foundation says: "There is a wealth of evidence to suggest that statins are superior to diet in lowering cholesterol levels." The BHF also points out "this is a small short-term study supported by numerous food manufacturers, which may have influenced the findings".<br><br><br><br>
Nonetheless, the BHF acknowledges that diet is important: "Statins should always complement a healthy balanced diet, rather than replace it."<br><br><br><br>
Journal reference: Journal of the American Medical Association: (vol 290, p 502
 

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"A typical dinner from the ape menu would be tofu bake with ratatouille of aubergine, onions and sweet peppers, with pearled barley and vegetable side dishes, says the team." I haven´t heart of apes preparing such dinners.<br><br>
Sterol-enriched margarines are already on the market.<br><br>
Maybe the idea is to attract attention.
 

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"I haven´t heart of apes preparing such dinners.<br><br>
Sterol-enriched margarines are already on the market."--LOL Lothar, very funny! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think the point was that it was an equivalent meal <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I saw an article about the "ape diet" in my local paper this morning. I've said this before, but I'm always seeing "heart-healthy" or "cholesterol-lowering" diets that are essentially vegan, but for some reason they never mention the word "vegetarian," much less vegan. Why? Because people won't want to follow the diet if they see those terms? Funny.
 

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"Because people won't want to follow the diet if they see those terms?"<br><br>
---<br><br>
Probably. Americans are so hung up on the bad conotations of "being healthy" I think they still think of it as being "hippy" or "granola eating freaks", or don't want their friends and family to think badly of them. Whatever that means! "What, you're not eating meat?! What's wrong with you? Are you sick?"<br><br><br><br>
So I think people who write articles want to use a catchy title for the diet, so people can say "I'm on the Ape Diet" instead of "I'm Vegan".
 

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I was watching the nature channel and I am almost positive the gorilla had a pack of Pete's Tofu in his hand ... but he slipped away from the camera (I know I'm secretive with my recipe's too ;-) )<br><br><br><br>
hehhehehe ... it's kindof funny with the tofu bake thing ...but nice article :)
 

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"What, you're not eating meat?! "<br><br>
---------------------<br><br><br><br>
You might even be thought of as unpatriotic by some people if you don't eat steak ;-)
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by jwnyc</i><br><br><b>"Because people won't want to follow the diet if they see those terms?"<br><br>
---<br><br>
Probably. Americans are so hung up on the bad conotations of "being healthy" I think they still think of it as being "hippy" or "granola eating freaks", or don't want their friends and family to think badly of them.</b></div>
</div>
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Yeah. *sigh* But the irony of it is that this "mystery diet" can be summed up so much more easily by saying, "Don't eat meat, eggs, or dairy," than by listing 10 things that they CAN have. OK, I'm exaggerating, and of course you could be unhealthy by eating nothing but fried potatoes. But still!<br><br><br><br>
One time I caught part of an Oprah show and it was about some heart-disease-reversal diet, and the expert was going through a woman's kitchen and showing her what to eat and what not to. Everything he gave the thumbs-up to was vegan, though of course this was never mentioned. He wanted her to get rid of her olives, though. I was thinking, "If she gets rid of all her animal products, she can probably go ahead and enjoy an olive now and then!!"
 

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LOL! mmm... olives.<br><br><br><br>
The Globe and Mail (<a href="http://www.theglobeandmail.com" target="_blank">www.theglobeandmail.com</a>) published a whole day on the diet:<br><br><br><br>
Breakfast -- Hot oat-bran cereal; soy beverage; strawberries; sugar and psyllium; oat-bran bread; enriched margarine; double-fruit jam<br><br><br><br>
Snack -- almonds; soy beverage; fresh fruit<br><br><br><br>
Lunch -- Spicy black-bean soup; sandwich with soy deli slices; oat-bran bread; enriched margarine; lettuce; tomato; cucumber<br><br><br><br>
Snack -- Almonds, psyllium, fresh fruit<br><br><br><br>
Dinner -- Tofu bake with eggplant, onions and sweet peppers; pearled barley; vegetables<br><br><br><br>
Snack -- fresh fruit; psyllium; soy beverage<br><br><br><br>
It's funny how every day in the news there seems to be another study implying (or in some cases screaming) that people should go vegetarian. I suspect that by never saying the word vegetarian the publishers of the studies manage to stay below the radar of meat and dairy lobbyists who bristle at the thought of veganism.<br><br><br><br>
(edited for bizzare typo)
 

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Sunnyk: I think you´re right with terms. People were eagerly following the Eskimo diet or every year you´´ll have the asparagus or strawberry or whatever diet. If you´d call veg*n "CEO dietary plan" more people might get attracted.
 

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I gave the article to my parents to read. They were told if they don't reduce their cholesterol, they will have to go on the drugs.
 

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Another diet du jour! I'm not too fond of these things. It looks kind ahealthy, but they've cut out a whole food group - I don't see any falafel on there!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Loki</i><br><br><b>Another diet du jour!</b></div>
</div>
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Yeah, it is. But it seems to me that a lot of the diets du jour lately are essentially vegan, just with a bunch of different names. (Adkins aside, of course.)<br><br><br><br>
Of course, even the idea of a "more-vegetarian" diet is not new; even back in the eighties it was all about smaller portions of meat and more veggies, duh. But that was in the dark days of protein-combining (you'll die if you don't mix brown rice and corn and beans at least once a day), plus they forgot to mention that if you're loading up on dairy it's essentially the same thing as eating meat.<br><br><br><br>
That was one of the things that really amazed me when I first went vegetarian -- that through my dairy intake I was actually covered as far as the supposed "meat necessities."
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by schu</i><br><br><b>Mediterranean diet backed as a whole<br><br>
26 June 2003<br><br><br><br>
Atkin's diet may cut risk of heart disease<br><br>
22 May 2003<br><br><br><br>
Day-on, day-off diet boosts health<br><br>
28 April 2003</b></div>
</div>
<br>
*looks at watch and makes announcement* Yep. Right on time. The new diet du jour is the Ape Diet. To all those that were following the Mediterranean diet or the Day-on, day-off diet PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR TRENDS, PEOPLE. You're alrady behind on which diet you should be following now... *insert look of fake disgust*<br><br><br><br>
Coming next: The seed-based diet, the horticulture diet, and the photosynthsis diet. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br><br><br>
ETA: I know that these are related stories for the Ape Diet article. I was just having a bit of fun with diet names and how often diets seem to come and go even though it's basically the same eating plan wrapped in new disguises (Atkins aside)...
 

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How about the rabbit diet? My community's overrun with them and they keep stealing my herbs so I figure I'll beat them at their own game and dig up all my herbs first <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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You know what? If the world does ever become vegetarian or (hold your breath) vegan, we won't have to call ourselves those things anymore, anyway. In fact, foods might be labeled to warn consumers about animal content. So, my point is, I don't care if they never call themselves veg*ns so long as they all start eating like us. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 
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