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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been thinking tonight, wondering, if there is something about us that makes us different in our mental makeup than the rest of the population, ie the omni population.

I have been on another forum, the forum that I have been posting on for years, and I have realised that my vegetarianism makes me very different from most of the members.

I have seen one person with that comment in their sig line: "For every animal you dont eat I will eat three" or something, which makes me feel pretty angry when I read them saying something like that. It is insensitive.

And people who I have seen tonight talking about "plants having feelings so it is as bad to eat them, they have been showed to have stress reactions."

The Third World argument about Bourgeois western Veg*ns...

anyway all this stuff I saw on just one thread. I was really confused after reading some of these.

I was looking at it and thinking, even when I was omni I never agreed with these ideas. I remember when I was omni I felt a deep sense of regret about meat but I had been brought up to be an omni and I thought at the time that that was how things were.

Also I had been told that the vegetarian diet was bland and boring (which has turned out to be not true... : ) ) and I thought I would never be able to stick to it.

I never remember feeling the sense that some omnis seem to feel, from what I have noticed in the comments I read on that board tonight, anyway..

So the idea I am having now is that there is something in our makeup which makes us different from the rest of the population, and I am not really sure what it is.

Perhaps it is a tendency towards viewing animals in a different way than the general population.

I dont know but I really do feel different from them, even from my own immediate family, I went out to dinner with them last night for Mother's Day and I was aware of feeling very different.

Any ideas on this, would be welcome.
 

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Hmmm, I don't think it's genetic or anything like that, though I suppose perhaps some people are born with greater capacities for compassion, empathy, etc. That would probably make a person more likely to adopt a vegetarian/vegan lifestyle.

I also had the same sort of reaction, when it was brought to my attention that as someone who cared about animals it was problematic that I was eating animals. My own response was to stop eating them. It made sense, that I shouldn't do that. It's perfectly rational: if you care about animals, you don't eat them. Plain and simple.

It's been shown that there's a link between intelligence and vegetarianism/veganism, that people who are intelligent tend to be able to think for themselves, to challenge unacceptable practices. I suspect there's also a link to experiencing personal suffering, discrimination, etc. - if you know what it's like to not count, to be used/abused, you're probably more likely to be sensitive to the plight of others suffering from abuse.
 

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what a good question. one i have been asking myself over the years, am I different. well it depends on what you devine as normal?

i use to live on red meat when I was under the age of 13. then we visited my uncles sheep farm. Walking into the kitchen with my aunt sawing up the pieces of sheep really freaked me out and then seeing a sheeps throat being cut while it kicks the fear in its eyes will probably forever stay with me. Its horrible! I stopped eating red meat after that. For years I still ate chicken and fish. BUT like it was pointed out above the idea didnt sit well with me and I felt horrible after eating meat. Also thought that I would do myself harm becoming vegetarian.

For me its the fact that I am a very very very sensitive person. I like to live in harmony with living creatures of all kind.

My friends and family have actually been very very supportive as now I enjoy things I use to hate like cooking. My friends go out of their way to accomodate me my friend even made me a real veggie burger with patato on friday at his place.

I should have switch years ago but like with everything i quess you do, when the time is right.

For me its still a personal journey.

I often still get : How do you survive without meat? Or do you eat fish?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freesia View Post

I dont know but I really do feel different from them, even from my own immediate family, I went out to dinner with them last night for Mother's Day and I was aware of feeling very different.

Any ideas on this, would be welcome.
I know what you mean. I went out with my family circle recently for a meal. I'm the only veggie in the group and they all love their steaks and chicken. When the waiter came to me and I asked for the risotto, there was an audible silence and you could cut the air with a knife!! Not that anyone said anything, that was the point! they were all noticeably lacking in any interest why I was ordering that. You could almost hear their brains clicking over as to why anyone would be mad enough to order something without meat in it!
I can't say that veggies are necessarily more intelligent, but we do certainly stand out in a crowd!
 

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I believe most people are fundamentally good, and already have the basic values that might cause them to become vegetarian instilled from an early age. People don't eat meat because they don't love animals. There's a disconnect between the ethics of their upbringing and their everyday actions. Most people simply have meat culture forced on them from infancy and never have a chance to think it over or reject it. For some, the lines aren't drawn until well into their teenage or adult years.

Sometimes it simply takes someone being out there to connect with people to create new vegetarians, because there's a vegetarian waiting to happen inside of every human being. I ate meat for the first 19 years of my life, but because a young brave girl took time out of her day to educate me, I stopped eating meat seven years ago. I didn't become vegan because I suddenly adopted new values or my IQ suddenly increased. I made the change because of the personality and ethics I already had, and the way I suddenly was confronted with the truth.

We don't stand out in a crowd. We look, behave like, speak like almost everyone else. Anyone out there could already be a vegetarian or a vegetarian waiting to happen. I believe in the essential goodness and potential of humanity. That's why I spend some of my time reaching out and trying to create change. You never know when you'll connect, and more than double your positive impact in the world.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freesia View Post

I have seen one person with that comment in their sig line: "For every animal you dont eat I will eat three" or something, which makes me feel pretty angry when I read them .
Don't waste your efforts getting angry because with every third animal he eats, that smug arsehole is probably tripling his cancer risk.
 

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I've always thought the same thing, that I'm different. I think in general, vegetarians tend to be more compassionate and logical people.
 

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Vegetarians seem more sensitive to the plight of animals, but I've noticed that sensitivity often ends when the subject changes from animals to something else, like people, (especially children). So, I'm not sure I would consider vegetarians more compassionate over all.

Also, many vegetarians believe in all sorts of supernatural nonesense, so I'm not sure that they are more logical over all, either.

I believe for an omni to become a vegetarian, there must be some sort of catalyst. "I watched meet your meat..." "I saw my uncle kill a chicken" "I thought about how much I love my dog..." And what works as a catalyst for one person, won't necessarily work for another, as we are all different.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by delicioso View Post

Vegetarians seem more sensitive to the plight of animals, but I've noticed that sensitivity often ends when the subject changes from animals to something else, like people, (especially children). So, I'm not sure I would consider vegetarians more compassionate over all.

Also, many vegetarians believe in all sorts of supernatural nonesense, so I'm not sure that they are more logical over all, either.

I believe for an omni to become a vegetarian, there must be some sort of catalyst. "I watched meet your meat..." "I saw my uncle kill a chicken" "I thought about how much I love my dog..." And what works as a catalyst for one person, won't necessarily work for another, as we are all different.
Can you give some examples of vegetarians who condone or participate in child abuse or child hate? I hear this a lot but I've never seen a legitimate example. Is this some abortion argument or something?
 

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Originally Posted by stasher View Post

Don't waste your efforts getting angry because with every third animal he eats, that smug arsehole is probably tripling his cancer risk.
I find that going with that argument is very easy if you're the vegetarian. "Well, for every three you eat I won't eat ten!" Continue ad infinitum. You can't lose.


Anyway, I agree with Josh that most people already have the compassion required to be a veg*n, but their disconnect keeps them from seeing that the torture that farm animals go through is just as bad as other animal abuse. I think many are waiting for the right trigger to come along.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh James xVx View Post

Can you give some examples of vegetarians who condone or participate in child abuse or child hate? I hear this a lot but I've never seen a legitimate example. Is this some abortion argument or something?
Just from reading this board. Haven't you noticed the anti-child tone to a lot of people's posts? I certainly have. And, what some want to do to ignorant animal abusers. Yikes.

I am staunchly pro-choice. This has nothing to do with abortion.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kjesta View Post

I find that going with that argument is very easy if you're the vegetarian. "Well, for every three you eat I won't eat ten!" Continue ad infinitum. You can't lose.


Anyway, I agree with Josh that most people already have the compassion required to be a veg*n, but their disconnect keeps them from seeing that the torture that farm animals go through is just as bad as other animal abuse. I think many are waiting for the right trigger to come along.
Yep. Sometimes it takes the right catalyst. I've seen grown people in tears before because of things I showed them, usually pamphlets. They were literally waiting for someone like me or similar to me to come along and show them the truth. They were vegetarians all along and just didn't know it. I strongly believe people like that are literally everywhere out there, especially in open minded crowds like public campuses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by delicioso View Post

Just from reading this board. Haven't you noticed the anti-child tone to a lot of people's posts? I certainly have. And, what some want to do to ignorant animal abusers. Yikes.

I am staunchly pro-choice. This has nothing to do with abortion.
I haven't, no. I've seen people make perfectly reasonable statements about why they personally aren't interested in having children, but I haven't seen any outright malice. Maybe I just overlook negative things, or haven't clicked on the right threads. Strangely I've seen more animal activist on animal activist hate around here than anything else.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by delicioso View Post

Just from reading this board. Haven't you noticed the anti-child tone to a lot of people's posts? I certainly have. And, what some want to do to ignorant animal abusers. Yikes.
Yes I have noticed this as well. I don't know if I'd call it anti-child as much as I'd call it anti-human, but yes I've noticed it too.
 

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Originally Posted by Kimberlily1983 View Post

It's been shown that there's a link between intelligence and vegetarianism/veganism, that people who are intelligent tend to be able to think for themselves, to challenge unacceptable practices. I suspect there's also a link to experiencing personal suffering, discrimination, etc. - if you know what it's like to not count, to be used/abused, you're probably more likely to be sensitive to the plight of others suffering from abuse.
I agree. I think vegetarians tend to be more "think outside of the box" kind of people. Not that it is really outside of the box or ingenius to not eat something filled with hormones, antibiotics, and disease..... but hopefully you know what I mean.
 

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Originally Posted by Rad14 View Post

I know what you mean. I went out with my family circle recently for a meal. I'm the only veggie in the group and they all love their steaks and chicken. When the waiter came to me and I asked for the risotto, there was an audible silence and you could cut the air with a knife!! Not that anyone said anything, that was the point! they were all noticeably lacking in any interest why I was ordering that. You could almost hear their brains clicking over as to why anyone would be mad enough to order something without meat in it!
I can't say that veggies are necessarily more intelligent, but we do certainly stand out in a crowd!
Ahh sounds like an outing with my family. Not for one instant do they consider the fact that I might just be doing the right thing and maybe they should begin to question the food they eat.
 

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I think it comes down to mettle.
Becoming a veg*n is to admit that you have been wrong in the past - something most people can't do - and furthermore, it's a stance that says, even if you only whisper it, that others are in the wrong. You don't have to be a zealous veg*n for people to take offense at your lifestyle choice, because it inherently criticizes theirs. It's not something everyone can do.
 

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I've thought a lot about this as well, as I consider myself to be an outside the box person, as has been pretty much every veg*n I've met in person. Although not all are nicer, my ex's mother was vegetarian, and she was abusive towards him as well.

I certainly believe the correlation between intelligence and going veg*n, as I have noticed that the kids who are resistant to the brainwashing that goes on during their upbringing are also more likely to make this choice, as these people develop their own internal sense of right and wrong early on in life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks all, there are so many interesting replies I dont know which ones to quote!

Anyway, as I have read here, I think that possibly we may be more sensitive, more attuned to animals, perhaps some of us may have experienced some bullying, and we may be more likely to act independently from society. I think perhaps it is a combination of any of these factors.

Thanks, have a headache and cant write in any more detail. But keep the interesting replies coming!
 

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There is definitely something different about "us." What could it be?
I think sometimes people like to be led blindly... "what I don't know can't hurt me" - educate yourself and stop being a sheep to our government and what others say is right. Knowledge is power. Maybe we do a better job at standing up for ourselves, animals, and our beliefs. I'm just speaking for myself here.
 
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