VeggieBoards banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Herbivorous Urchin
Joined
·
9,717 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Before this gets angry, I eat eggs myself. I was just thinking about it, and they're not exactly vegetarian though, if you think about it.

An egg is really just the place for an animal to grow in, consisting of things for the fetus to come to term,

and if you look at animals other than us that eat them, they are hardly vegetarian animals.

What are the arguments that say an egg is vegetarian, aside from the "It's not literal tissue from an animal" But even then, it kind of is.

I'm not talking about the ethical dilemma, or anything like that, just how we classify eggs as vegetarian.
 

·
Herbivorous Urchin
Joined
·
9,717 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sevenseas View Post

As a matter of facts, egg production involves the destruction of life and meat production involves the destruction of life. Eggs can be obtained without killing animals, but so can meat, like if you scavenge for carcasses from nature. So "does not inherently involve destruction of life" would be a poor standard to define 'vegetarian' by...
Exactly. What line/point did Eggs become a vegetarian item, and do we classify them as such?
 

·
Herbivorous Urchin
Joined
·
9,717 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Again - THIS IS NOT ABOUT THE ETHICAL DILEMMA.

My point is that eggs, and their molecular composition do not seem to have any vegetarian properties, or anything that would otherwise make them Vegetarian, so why do we consider them vegetarian?
 

·
Herbivorous Urchin
Joined
·
9,717 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Werewolf Girl View Post

There are so many differences between vegetarians, the only thing that connects us all is we don't eat meat. When I think meat I think muscle tissue that was actually cut off an animal, that's the distinction for me. Eggs aren't technically flesh or muscle or whatever you want to call it yet, and if they are unfertilized they never will be. Gross and unethical for sure but not muscle.
So, even things made of animal cells can be considered vegetarian then?

I guess I just for some reason, began questioning how things made strictly of animal cells/proteins, has a vegetarian label.

So 'Vegetarian' comes down to "No Animal muscle tissue".
 

·
Herbivorous Urchin
Joined
·
9,717 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by affidavit View Post

River, I'm just trying to sort out what the logic is behind whether or not eggs are, not necessarily saying animal cells are okay or not. Although to some vegetarians they are, and that's fine by me.
As I said, I do no pieces of dead animals, and an egg isn't an animal, but this isn't the place to defend my ethics.

Also, directed to Ira and not this thread in general, I asked my boy if it was, in his opinion (not to be discussed here) ethical to use a blood egg in baking. His response was much like yours.
That's interesting, I hadn't thought about Blood in Eggs. I know that if you're cooking Extreme Kosher, you make sure you're not getting/eating an egg with blood in it, I just find it really interesting how we define vegetarianism.

The muscle tissue its self is not vegetarian, however the 100% animal proteins and really, by all means tissue in eggs are, and as you pointed out occasionally blood. It seems.... like a major classification issue. And I hope this doesn't come across as picking at ovo eaters, as I mentioned I occasionally use eggs in cooking, I just question what makes them vegetarian.
 

·
Herbivorous Urchin
Joined
·
9,717 Posts
Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomad888 View Post

In some languages, vegetarian includes fish. In others, it doesn't include any animal products. In English, it typically includes dairy and eggs. If most people understand vegetarian as including eggs then, yes, eggs are included. That's how language works. So from a linguistic perspective, the question is easy. A word means what most people understand it to mean. The word aweful, for example, historically meant full of awe (a positive thing) and over time the meaning changed because young children who hated going into the Roman cathedrals that were often described as aweful began sarcastically using the word with a more negative meaning, and the dictionary definition changed to remain in line with society's use of the word.

Language adapts over time and I will continue eating eggs regardless of what the word vegetarian changes to mean, so long as the eggs meet my standards. We all draw our line at a different point. It is our ethics that determine exactly where that line is. The word itself is based on nothing more than an arbitrary interpretation assigned by the majority. Do what you feel is right regardless, and then find the word that best describes it for when you feel the need to communicate whatever it is that you do.
I think you're right, it's a 'common meaning' rather than a true diction term, as you would think vege-tarian would mean exactly what vegan means, vegetation eater.

Anyhow, I was just curious how we came to terms with eggs being included in a vegetarian diet, I really think the linguistic explanation is the only one that seems to be correct.
 

·
Herbivorous Urchin
Joined
·
9,717 Posts
Discussion Starter · #64 ·
@Dave Interesting!!

Edit: I'm SO glad you posted that, I have to write a paper this weekend about changes in the educational system, and so on, And I'm going to pull some things from that!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top