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In the western world, eggs are considered vegetarian because they do not involve the destruction of life. The eggs in the stores are not fertilized.
 

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Originally Posted by Sevenseas View Post

As a matter of facts, egg production involves the destruction of life and meat production involves the destruction of life. Eggs can be obtained without killing animals, but so can meat, like if you scavenge for carcasses from nature. So "does not inherently involve destruction of life" would be a poor standard to define 'vegetarian' by...
I'm aware that commercial egg production is an issue, so free-ranged eggs are okay. The point I was trying to make is that eggs are considered vegetarian.

Lacto-ovo vegetarianism is the most common type.

http://www.vegsoc.org/page.aspx?pid=698
 

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Originally Posted by River View Post

That's interesting, I hadn't thought about Blood in Eggs. I know that if you're cooking Extreme Kosher, you make sure you're not getting/eating an egg with blood in it, I just find it really interesting how we define vegetarianism.

The muscle tissue its self is not vegetarian, however the 100% animal proteins and really, by all means tissue in eggs are, and as you pointed out occasionally blood. It seems.... like a major classification issue. And I hope this doesn't come across as picking at ovo eaters, as I mentioned I occasionally use eggs in cooking, I just question what makes them vegetarian.
Eggs are vegetarian because they can be obtained without killing the hens; just as milk can be obtained without killing the cow. That's what makes them vegetarian. Although there are issues with how they are treated in commercial operations, that is another subject. I'm merely answering the question as to why eggs are considered vegetarian.
 

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Originally Posted by tensai View Post

Not sure but I think India has more vegetarians than the rest of the world combined, and they are mostly lacto-vegetarians, making that the most common vegetarian form? (Not that I need to follow the biggest group - can't stand/handle milk products myself)..
In the western world, lacto-ovo vegetarianism is the most common form. But I don't see this as a matter to argue about.
 
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