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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found a job opportunity today and I'm going for an interview tommorow night.<br><br><br><br>
A family downtown are looking for a school aid for their 10 year old high-function autistic boy (starting in September, but training over summer), and I really hope I get it.<br><br><br><br>
It pays well, and would be super rewarding, and is exactly the sort of experience I want for my future field.<br><br><br><br>
Thing is, most of my experience is with hearing impaired and other special needs kids, but never autism. I think alot of the skills are transferrable though, at the very least.<br><br><br><br>
They don't mind me not having experience with autistic kids- they're willing to train me as long as the kid really likes me. I would work with a full-time group of support people also, which means I can ask any questions and get help if I need it along the way.<br><br><br><br>
I'm really excited. I hope I get it!!<br><br><br><br>
I've been doing research all day on autism and ABA therapy, and how to go about working with such a child, in prep for the interview, but does anyone else have any good experience with this, or resources to recommend??<br><br><br><br>
I'd appreciate any help, and all your good vibes, if you will!!<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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try checking the chatboards on <a href="http://www.teachers.net" target="_blank">www.teachers.net</a> there should be a spec ed board on there that might cover autism. OR in the main teacher forum they might be able to answer your questions as a lot of teachers on that site deal with autistic children being mainstreamed into their classrooms. good luck!
 

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I had a student with autism (specifically Asbergers, which I was told is a form of autism) in my class for part of this school year. He had a habit of tuning out at times. He would stare at his hands for extended periods of time. Also, he had a haibt of laughing out loud at random times. To me, this became completely "normal" if you will, for this little boy. It takes some extra patience to work w/students like this, but it is not impossible. I found this little boy to be quite capable & a joy to be around. Typically, children w/autism are not very affection, however this is not always the case. In the case of the little boy in my class, he was one of the few students who never ran up to hug me. It took him longer than other students to make friends & become comfortable w/things like playing w/other kids at recess. He was, however, a very sweet little boy & a joy to have in my classroom. Yes, children w/autism are a bit different in some ways, however they are just as easy to love. I'm currently taking a class called Mainstreaming the Exceptional Child, which talks about working w/children w/disabilities. So, if you have any specific questions, I can probably look them up in one of my textbooks. Good luck & I'm sure you'll love the experience!
 

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There is an autistic child in the classroom I work in. I'm not sure what the severity of his is compared to other children because he is the first child I have every worked with who has it.<br><br><br><br>
He is in a regular 5th grade classroom. However, there are only 17 kids in the entire room and they have an aide there (me) who works every single day all the way up to lunch time, so he gets alot of attention.<br><br><br><br>
In my experiences with him I've found that he never pays attention unless you are speaking to him directily. If you are teaching the class a lesson, he does not pay attention. After you are done, if you explain it to him individually, he will learn a little, but not at the same level of the other children. Sometimes when you address him, he gives you a blank stare back. In my experineces with him, I've learned that he just needed tons of individual attention. He is a great kid and I really enjoy working with him. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Get him talking about Harry Potter, and you'll never get him to quiet down again. Its the only time I ever really hear him talk admintly about something. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Good luck on your interview.
 

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My friend works with two children with autism, both boys. It's interesting how it is so much more common in boys. She says they have good days and bad days. They aren't very affectionate or social which is normal for autism. They each have their special talents. For example, one can multiply insanely large numbers in his head in a matter of seconds. My friend really enjoys it. Autistic children typically need routine and structure.
 

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i think it really varies from case to case. sort of like different people with OCD have their own set of symptoms, personality traits, habits, etc. i think that's why autism is so hard to fully understand, it's so different with each child.<br><br>
but like everyone else has said, they just need some extra attention, and i'm sure after spending some time with him you'll get to know each other and be able to figure out what types of activities he responds to best. it's sort of trial and error i guess<br><br><br><br>
good luck, i hope you get it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
if you need info i could maybe ask my bf's mom, she was a teacher's aide in a 'special' class and worked with all kinds of kids, some with autism, and she just graduated university . and did a lot of child psychology and behaviour classes i think.
 

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"Typically, children w/autism are not very affection, however this is not always the case."<br><br><br><br>
If it isn't the case, then the child does not really have autism, which is, by definition, "characterized by avoiding involvement with other, especially affective involment."<br><br><br><br>
Many deaf children are have no other learning disabilities. Some children have a large range of abnormalities, deafness being only one of them.<br><br><br><br>
Av writes:<br><br>
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They don't mind me not having experience with autistic kids- they're willing to train me as long as the kid really likes me.<br><br>
=================<br><br><br><br>
Er, if the kid is autistic, he won't "like" you, or dislike you. He won't seem to care. That is how people decided he is autistic. At least, superficially he will give signs that most people interpret that way. Whether they really like or don't like others, is hard to tell. But others interpret their behavior that way. They, by definition, aren't huggy.
 

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Since individuals with autistic characteristics are often very different from each other, I think it is better to think of autism as a characteristic, rather than a disorder, or a symptom, rather than a syndrome.<br><br><br><br>
Some people who act autisticly seem to be very intelligent and very curious, and very interested in learning as much as they can; other seem to not care, and perhaps may lack mental abilities, as well as lack normal affection characteristics. Other seem to be about average.
 

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yeah, i've heard/seen of cases where kids with autism had photographic memory or really amazing abilities in math or ability to memorize statistics etc. maybe they shut off one part of their brain and it allows the part that learns to absorb more than normal, or something. it's really interesting anyway
 

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There's a fellow here in Nashville who writes one of the leading on-line journals in the country.<br><br><br><br>
He had three sons, two of whom were autistic. One died a few years ago at age 16.<br><br><br><br>
If you want to read about autism from a father's perspective, read entries like:<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.novanotes.com/apr2003/apr262003.htm" target="_blank">http://www.novanotes.com/apr2003/apr262003.htm</a>
 

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Try checking out <a href="http://www.mothering.com" target="_blank">www.mothering.com</a> They have had many articles on raising autistic children. This might give you some insight, although every child is different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ok... I'm off to the interview in 5.<br><br><br><br>
I do recall now (you're right) she said: See how well he responds to you! -rather than, 'if he likes you'...<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Still. I hope I get it. It would be such an interesting job.<br><br><br><br>
cross your fingers and wish me luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks!<br><br><br><br>
I think it went quite well actually!<br><br>
HE initiated touch with me (twice!), which he did with no other candidates, and his mum brought it to the attention of the therapist in front of us. They seemed to consider that a pretty big deal- so I guess that bodes well for me!<br><br><br><br>
Whatever happens, I am happy with how it went. I think I did a good job all things considered, and I don't have any regrets.<br><br><br><br>
But still- keep those fingers crossed while they decide! I really want this job!<br><br><br><br>
EEeeeeep!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hey- I got it! Well, pretty sure... They want to hire me, but first I need to go back for another one on one session with him and the therapist, just to make sure.<br><br><br><br>
This is great, thanks so much for the Chi!
 

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woohoo, good job <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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My sister has asberger syndrome, a form of autism. These are a couple of resources my parents use:<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.aut" target="_blank">http://www.aut</a> <a href="http://ism-resources.com/links.html" target="_blank">ism-resources.com/links.html</a><br><br><br><br>
autism.org<br><br><br><br>
I asked my mom to email me some more links so i'll post them here when i get them.<br><br><br><br>
From my own experience: She (my sister) frequently gets lost in her own little world, and will do something on impulse without thinking about the consequences;<br><br>
she'll go out to the front yard and wander far from home without telling anybody, even late at night.<br><br>
It is true about autistic people not being very affectionate, but sometimes she can be, it depends on her mood.<br><br>
When she meets someone she'll decide right away if she likes you or not, and she won't change her mind. So it's a good idea to make a good first impression <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 
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