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My cat has tested positive for FLV.He's a big cat (14 lbs) and has always appeared to be in good health until yesterday when he collapsed and

wouldn't get up.The vet said his iron levels were extremely low and he was very dehydrated.

I have him home now, giving him iron and TLC.

I THINK, from what I understand, he could pull out of this and become

immune and continue to live for years.The vet wanted to have him put down,

but I refused,asking to give it a week to see what I could do.

He's lost his appetite so I'm spoon feeding him small amounts every three hours,and he is drinking from his water dish. I don't think he's in any real

discomfort;just weak.He's grooming himself and purring when he's in

my lap.

Has anyone had experience with this illness?Any advice? Anything else

I should be doing? Thanks.
 

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I had a cat named Chester with Feline Leukemia, he was a stray, we had him for a week and took him to the vet who said he had leukemia and needed to be put out of his misery. It was really hard.

I don't know much about the disease itself thou.
 

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Sometimes they can live months even years so puting your cat down is a personal choice.

I wont lie to you though about 80% of cats who test pos for it will die within 3 years.

However if you treat your baby and see no improvment please do not keep the kitty alive for your own sake.

Evaluate the kitties quality of life before desiding.

If your cat tested posative for FLV he will not become immune that happens when they are exsposed to the virus and thier immune system effectivly keeps them from getting sick.

In about 40% of cats, the virus is successful and the cat eventually becomes persistently infected and excreting virus in its saliva. Another 30% of cats do not produce immunity but also do not become persistently infected immediately. In these cats, the virus hides in the bone marrow for up to 30 months. Eventually, these cats either overcome the virus or become persistently infected. Finally, some cats can develop latent or sequestered infection. This probably happens to less than 5-10% of cats. These cats, whose virus is hiding in sites such as the bone marrow, will rarely be contagious and are unlikely to develop illness. They will not test positive on routine testing.

I wish I could tell you there is a magical cure but there just is not
the best you can do is vaccinate and even that is not 100% effective.
 
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