VeggieBoards banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to find a good protein shake for in the mornings and perhaps for lunches occasionally too. I have looked on veganessentials and there are several kinds but not sure what to get....right now I am between the peaprotein and another that I forget the name but it says it is worth eating a pound of veggies and a pound of fruits! Any suggestions/or reviews? I usually mix mine in a blender with a splash of soy drink and a banana so taste isn't too big a factor since the banana is good at helping out in that area


Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Whatever you do, do not buy a soy protein powder. The issolated soy protein is not good for you. Buy pea, hemp, or brown rice protein. You could also check out www.myvega.com for a vegan protein powder not made from soy. It is expensive though...

However, if you are eating a wide variety of vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds, and whole grains, I don't see why you would need extra protein.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,348 Posts
I have three protein shakes a week one after a workout.

I blend Chocolate Almond Milk, a scoop of hemp protein powder, a scoop of "Vegetarian Protein Powder*" some frozen berries and a tbs of all-natural peanut butter.


If I didn't life weights I wouldn't bother with a protein shake. Your average person doesn't need as much protein as they think they need.

May I ask why you're considering one or two protein shakes a day?

*It's a pea and rice protein powder which is vegan. But they call it "Vegetarian Protein Powder". Which is weird as most protein powders are made with whey...which is vegetarian...you know?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I work out 5 to 6 days a week and do lift weights (not free weights but machines) I just want the little bit of extra for those days I do not get enough in. I know I don't need some crazy amount each day but just like the extra boost especially in the mornings. Thanks for the info and I will stick with non-soy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Here's the study on soy protein supplementation...

Sequential, randomized trial of a low-fat, high-fiber diet and soy supplementation: effects on circulating IGF-I and its binding proteins in premenopausal women.

Int J Cancer. 2005; 116(2):297-303 (ISSN: 0020-7136)

Gann PH ; Kazer R ; Chatterton R ; Gapstur S ; Thedford K ; Helenowski I ; Giovanazzi S ; Van Horn L

Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. [email protected]

Despite evidence supporting the involvement of the IGF system in the development of breast and other cancers, the major determinants of interindividual variability in circulatory IGF-I levels are not well understood. Previous research has pointed to important genetic influences as well as dietary effects through marked calorie or protein restriction. We conducted a randomized trial to determine the effects of 2 dietary patterns on serum IGF-1, IGFBP1 and IGFBP3 in free-living premenopausal women: phase 1, an isocaloric low-fat, high-fiber (LFHF) vs. usual diet, and phase 2, a soy supplement either with or without isoflavones (soy+IF vs. soy-IF). Participants completed 12 menstrual cycles on phase 1 and then were randomly assigned to a soy supplement for 3 cycles while maintaining the phase 1 diet. Before and after each phase, 154 women provided serum. We found no difference in the change in IGF-I, BP1 or BP3 in the LFHF group compared to the usual diet group. In phase 2, there were no differences in any IGF protein between the soy+IF and the soy-IF groups or any evidence of interaction between isoflavone exposure and the background diet. However, there was a small but statistically significant decrease (2.3%) in BP3 and an increase in the IGF-I:BP3 molar ratio among all 153 subjects following either soy supplement. These changes were correlated with changes in intake of calcium, total vegetable protein and soy. The results are compatible with previous data suggesting that increases in dietary calcium, protein and soy, in particular, could increase circulating levels of bioavailable IGF-I.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Doveingrey yes there is that is what I am asking about
Go to veganessentials and click on supplements then shakes I believe.....the two I am asking about are on there....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
I use Naturade's Veg Protein Booster, which is soy-free.

http://www.vitasprings.com/vegetable...-naturade.html

Quote:
Naturade Soy-Free Veg Protein Booster is an important product for people who exclude meat and dairy from their usual diet but whose system doesn¡¯t tolerate soy. Naturade Soy-Free Veg is pure vegetable protein. This unique blend of high-quality protein from pea, rice, potato, barley and spirulina provides a balanced supply of amino acids. Methionine and lysine are added to match the amino acid profile of animal protein. This all-natural product has absolutely no animal, egg or dairy derivatives.

Protein supplies the amino acids your body needs to support the growth of all blood cells, muscle and other tissues. In addition, protein is needed to produce hormones such as insulin, antibodies to fight disease and the enzymes that are essential for digestion. Naturade Soy-Free Veg assures that you get all the amino acids in the right proportion, including all the essential amino acids that your body can¡¯t produce on its own.

Naturade Soy-Free Veg is fortified with 100% of the daily value of vitamin B-12, plus 8 mg of iron and 150 mg of calcium per serving. The amount of these nutrients is usually inadequate in an all-vegetable diet. Naturade Soy-Free Veg is formulated with pea protein that has not been genetically modified. So you can confidently add protein to the foods and drinks you already prepare with low carbohydrates and no added sugar.

Soy Free Vegetable Protein Ingredients

Protein Blend (Pea Protein Isolate, Rice Protein, Potato Protein Hydrolysate, Spirulina) Tricalcium Phosphate, Fiber Blend (Rice Bran, Corn Bran, Apple Fiber, Oat Fiber, Pea Fiber), Natural Flavors, Reishi and Shiitake Mushroom Extract, Enzyme Blend (Papain and Bromelain), DL-Methionine, L-Lysine Hydrochloride and Cyanocobalamin.

Directions

Drinks and Smoothies: Stir or shake 1/3 cup (28.4 grams) into 8 oz. of your favorite juice or beverage. For a delicious smoothie, add it to crushed ice and fruit in a blender.

Food Preparation: Use in cooking to add protein to sauces, soups, stews and casseroles or to cereals, pancakes and muffins. Natural Flavor has little taste so you can add it to most foods.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top