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Okay so this is a question more to the vegetarians than vegans, or moreover, from a vegetarian perspective.<br><br><br><br>
Only I was buying a jumper when my mum asked was it machine washable, and I was rooting around the tags when I took a look at what it was made off, I saw the word "rabbit" and droped it (lol) and was pretty disgusted. My mum told me these rabbits have really long fur, and you wouldn't have to kill (or harm) the rabbit to use it's fur. Is she right? and I mean... What sort of conditions would they keep them in? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/blank.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":|"><br><br><br><br>
Anyway, I didn't buy the jumper. But I wanted to ask about it to know, would it have been okay morally for me to wear it. Bareing in mind I do wear wool but I don't wear leather or suede (?? how do you spell that ??) oviosuly you can't tell me what my morals are, but yknow. Anyone know the detail?<br><br><br><br>
xxx
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Angora wool can be harvested year round, and most fiber enthusiasts do this by holding the rabbit on their lap and either combing out the fiber, or (careful) scissor harvesting. The Angoras notoriously seem to enjoy this frequent attention, and the harvesting process causes them no stress or pain whatsoever. Angora wool harvesting is said to be a calming process for both the groomer and the “groomee”.</div>
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I found that <a href="http://www.homestead.org/LivestockDirectory/VictoriaVargas/AngoraRabbits.htm" target="_blank">here</a><br><br><br><br>
I wouldn't buy it (despite how beautifully soft it is) because you can never really know for sure how the animals are treated. But the 'harvesting' is more like shearing than leather/fur production - they are not killed for the fur - if that's what you wanted to know.
 

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Actually, I know of a lot of knitters/spinners who keep Angoras as pets and harvest their wool by combing. They are crazy cute little critters.
 

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<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>rincaro</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
They are crazy cute little critters.</div>
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<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/yes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":yes:"> I saw a picture on that website too. Adorable! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smitten.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":smitten:">
 

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While it is possible for people who keep pet angoras to humanely comb the wool, keep in mind that it's seriously doubtful that sweaters being sold in a commercial store were made by Aunt Bea and her pet bunny.<br><br><br><br>
Like most commercial enterprises involving animals, profits come first. In the angora industry, baby male rabbits (which produce much less wool) are simply thrown away as trash.
 

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My house rabbit Vegas after a "haircut"<br><br><br><br>
[attachment=4673:vegaspile1205.jpg]<br><br><br><br>
While Vegas doesn't love the actual grooming (I cut the wool close with kids' safety scissors), which takes a few sessions, she gets SO excited to run and play unencumbered when I'm done. I try to keep it somewhat short all the time so I don't have to brush her as much. Of course I just have her as a pet and I groom her because it's necessary for her health. I have been saving the wool to give to a spinner who also has a house rabbit.<br><br><br><br>
I'd say to mass produce angora rabbit wool, the animals would be kept in small outdoor or barn hutches/cages, fed a diet that only focuses on wool production (no greens or hay in most cases), and vet needs would be ignored or handled by breeder lore ("treatments" that don't work and sometimes harm). The average outdoor hutched rabbit is said to live 1-2 years while house rabbits live 7-10.<br><br><br><br>
I think I'd be happy to wear angora that came from my own rabbit or a known spinner, but in most cases it would be a boring/miserable life for the rabbit.<br><a href="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/2/24/24befe35_vbattach4650.jpeg"><img alt="LL" src="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/2/24/525x525px-LL-24befe35_vbattach4650.jpeg" style="width:525px;height:299px;"></a>
 

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I used to be owned by a lovley little angora bunny named maggie. When we would take her to the vet...people used to ask me "what kind of dog is that??" She was cutie & had the best temperment. These guys make awsome pets but they are surley high mantinence & not for everyone. Their fur needs to be well kept and they are at risks for fur related health issues (hairballs which cause internial blockage & need emergency surgery. Rabbits can not vomit). Their grooming and vet costs can get high quickly. I have never seen a commercial angora rabbitry.....most of the angora breeders I know of breed for show, pet, and wool purpouses and sell the yarn to upkeep their hobby & feed/vet their animals. This is why angora cloathing is pretty rare and expensive...because it is in short supply.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>MeganLynn</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I used to be owned by a lovley little angora bunny named maggie. When we would take her to the vet...people used to ask me "what kind of dog is that??"</div>
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haha, that's an awesome story. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:"><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smitten.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":smitten:">
 
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