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Hi All --- I wanted to know if someone might be able to tell me the main difference between Organic foods and Biological foods. It might appear to be obvious, but for some reason it isn't clear -- I have started buying and eating organic foods lately and I feel 100 times healthier - strange ... also - why are these things so very expensive?
thanks!
 

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non-organic foods use pesticedes which are poison given to insects. When you eat these, you are technically eating small doses of that poison. Also, some of the fertilizers used can be hard core for your body. There are a lot of unhealthy chemicals used. The reason why it's so expensive is because farmers have to use old techniques and harder work to keep insects off and to keep the plants alive. There is a lot more man power and money involved in growing organically. That's awesome that you've made the switch. Your body will thank you
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by sunshinemelissa

non-organic foods use pesticedes which are poison given to insects. When you eat these, you are technically eating small doses of that poison. Also, some of the fertilizers used can be hard core for your body. There are a lot of unhealthy chemicals used. The reason why it's so expensive is because farmers have to use old techniques and harder work to keep insects off and to keep the plants alive. There is a lot more man power and money involved in growing organically. That's awesome that you've made the switch. Your body will thank you
organic farmers still use pesticides, they are just "organically approved". one well-known organic pesticide is nicotine. because these organic pesticides don't work as well, farmers often have to use more in order to preserve their crops.

i am not 100% convinced that organics are more healthy for our bodies or the earth. i think a lot of it is very clever marketing. one thing that i do like about organics is that they are supposed to be completely free of GMOs.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Kreeli

one thing that i do like about organics is that they are supposed to be completely free of GMOs.
That's my #1 reason for buying organic when I can. I also prefer organic pesticides on certain fruits that are otherwise even more toxic when non-organic, like strawberries and bell peppers.
 

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sorry, i can't answer your question about the difference between organic and biological foods but here in germany the word for organic is "bio" so i *think* that isn't *much* of a difference. i am sure soilman could clarify this as he seems to be very knowledgeable in the area of organics. :d

i love eating organic. today i ate non-organic oven baked fries and i felt a bit sick afterwards and it happens everytime i eat them (which isn't often luckily). i think it also has to do with the horrid hydro fats too - uuggghhh!

that is awesome you have switched over to organics. i can certainly taste a difference. nothing beats fresh organic tomatoes - mmmmmm

as to the high prices. one possibility might be that the commercial, non organic farmers are subsidised more by the government as well. i'm not too sure though, just guessing.
 

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Yes I think Organic and Biological is the same, it's called Organic in English, and Biologic in other European languages. There are certainly differences between the regulations of the U.S. and the EU for what can be called organic, but the most important things are:

* no chemical pesticides

* no chemical herbicides

* no chemical fertilizers

* no toxic wastes can be produced

* no GMOs

So it's better for the environment and better for your health to eat organic foods.

I the U.S., the farmland the crops are growing on must be farmed organically for 3 years before the produce can be called organic. Before that it is "transitional". Sometimes you see transitional produce in the grocery, it is a good idea to support those farmers, and buy some. In the 3 years of the organic transition, farmers usually lose money.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Kreeli

i am not 100% convinced that organics are more healthy for our bodies or the earth. i think a lot of it is very clever marketing.
Well IMO for our bodies it's definitely better to eat produce with NO chemical pesticide residues on it. My body wasn't meant to ingest harmful artificial toxic substances designed and manufactured by chemical labs. So I try to avoid those. It's a nobrainer to me. Besides, in the past, there have been numerous examples of pesticides severely damaging either people (very often attacking the most vulnerable humans, pregnant women, causing birth defects, and children) or the environment (DDT). If we keep playing with fire, we will burn ourselves again. I don't want to play guinea pig for this experiment "industrial agriculture".

It is true what you write that organic farmers use pest control, but they are by far not as damaging as chemicals, besides because they are, well, organic, they tend to biodegrade very fast (before harvest). One of the most often used pest controls is Bt, which is a completely harmless bacterium.

As for the environment, yes, organic is better, because it tends to degrade the soil at a slower rate than industrial chemical agriculture. Usually, it is still degrading though. Organic argiculture is still not sustainable, and that's what many people don't know. But is still "more sustaniable" than chemical agriculture. It's better, but not not good enough for the long run.
 

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thanks for that info and your opinion oatmeal


i agree.

personally, i would rather pay a little more money for organic produce/products NOW rather than be the guinea pig with not knowing what will happen in the future. especially with GMO produce/products.

beardedlady, i often check that site, lots of great info and news pieces.
 

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an interesting article from the organic consumers website >>>

Quote:
Bush's Squeeze on Organic Farmers

The Big Money Still Flows to Chemical Ag - By BOB SCOWCROFT

More and more Americans are buying organic food. But is our government matching this groundswell of support with federal and state agricultural dollars? No. Organic farmers work with nature to control pests, weeds and disease. No synthetic fossil-fuel fertilizers are used and no hormones or antibiotics are used in livestock production. By many measures, organic food is healthier for our soil, water, wildlife and the people who grow it. The Agriculture Department last year issued standards and labeling rules for organic production and marketing. But where is the government's support, which still flows overwhelmingly to industrial agriculture? Most observers agree that in 2002 the organic products industry received about 1.5 to 2 percent of our nation's food dollar. Not much, some would say.

But consider this: Last year consumers spent about $10 billion on organic products. Back in 1989, one agricultural economist pegged the size of the organic industry at only $89 million. That's growth! Clearly growing numbers of Americans are saying organic farming is important. But the government so far fails to recognize this surging support. The Organic Farming Research Foundation has determined that certified-organic land-grant university research acreage has grown from 151 acres in 2001 to just over 496 acres_this out of a massive 886,000 acres now dedicated to agricultural research. Five years ago, OFRF published a report identifying the number of organic research projects funded by the USDA.

After running 75 key words through the USDA's 30,000 agricultural research projects database, OFRF discovered 34 explicitly organic projects. That translates to barely over one-tenth of 1 percent of our publicly funded agricultural research projects specifically dedicated to organic production practices. What about actual dollars devoted to helping organic growers farm and market better? The news is a bit better here. Or is it? Last year, for the first time, Congress appropriated $3 million for organic research and required that this be an annual expenditure for the next five years. Our federal budget is now $2.14 trillion. The USDA budget is $74 billion. But the total annual organic outlay, which also includes money for marketing, economic analysis and enforcement of organic standards, approaches only $8 million.

Organic farmers deserve their fair share of our nation's agricultural resources. A commitment to organic farming by the federal government that matches the commitment consumers have made to organic food would equal 1.5 to 2 percent of the USDA budget, or more than $1 billion. Think about it. That would go a long way to encourage a way of farming that is better for people and our planet. Bob Scowcroft is executive director of the Organic Farming Research Foundation, Santa Cruz, Calif. He is a member of the Land Institute's Prairie Writers Circle, Salina, Kan.
http://www.organicconsumers.org/orga...ic_farmers.cfm
 
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