VeggieBoards banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so I decided to go vegetarian for the simple ethical reasons that influence it. For me, the health side is just a plus. But I did not decide to go vegetarian for the reason that I didnt like the taste of meat.<br><br><br><br>
Now, before we get to my Q, I will point out im not there yet. My parents still dish out meat onto my plate and refuse to let me near the kitchen (well, after what happened last time, I dont say I can really blame them. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/chef.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":chef:"> ). They think it's a phase. I tell them i've been thinking of it for 10 years (Since I was six. You think that would be enough time for me to see both benifits and bad points and weigh them up on the scale, but no, apparently its not.)<br><br><br><br>
So, now to my Q. When they dish out meat and I eat it, I can still enjoy it. Is that bad? Should I not enjoy it? Sometimes it does make my stomach churn, if I think about what i'm eating (I do try not to, for the moment while I have to eat it). Should I not compliment their cooking, even if it's good? HELP, I am soooo confused about this all. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/huh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":confused:">. I dont know what to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
730 Posts
If you really feel that eating meat is no longer for you, why not try meat substitutes? You can enjoy them without feeling remorse. If you are ready, try easing into vegetarianism by reducing your meat intake and bringing in the good stuff. Don't push yourself, but let your parents know how you feel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
It is honestly all up to you. If you eat it and you feel any kind of remorse for the animal or it makes you sick then I think you should try not to eat meat.
 
Joined
·
11,550 Posts
hmmm hmmm hmmmm. *thinking*<br><br><br><br>
if you've eaten meat for years (i guess like most people you've grown up with it and had it as a big part of meals for well... forever) then you will naturally have associated feelings and emotions tied to it. um... for me, the smell of candyfloss makes me think of fairgrounds and fun and being up late and all that stuff- and i automatically feel a bit happy, when i smell it. the smell of whisky conjours fear in me, the texture of tomato soup and brown toast makes me feel comforted (i ate it when i was recovering from being sick as a kid). i think you'll most likely have developed a taste for meat from years of eating it, and your tastebuds and brain most likely appreciate its flavours, textures, etc.<br><br><br><br>
but, you've got these ethical strings pulling you in another direction too. i used to love the taste of fishfinger sandwiches, but when i hit 11 year old, it was tainted by my brain saying 'thats a chunk of a dead fish, in there, jen, why are you eating that?- thats nasty.'<br><br><br><br>
i think its easy to let yourself enjoy the taste, texture, etc of meat, if you find a way to mentally justify eating it, it to yourself, even though ethically, you know you aren't enjoying it. especially if you quash the uncomfortable feeling....perhaps of guilt (?), and mentally go 'lalala' loudly to yourself, or feed yourself a lie/justification/half truth/reason to make it kind of ok.<br><br><br><br>
perhaps the fact that feel you aren't really <i>allowed</i>... or maybe more its <i>not easy</i> for you to be vegetarian, is swaying the balance in your head, a little.<br><br><br><br>
i don't know if that makes sense.<br><br><br><br>
for example: when i was a smoker, i used to be able to think 'mmmmmm, lovely cigarette, feels so good when i inhale' while another part of me thought 'what a pile of crap, you're addicted, and its really quite horrid and gross having tar and crud dragged into your struggling mangled lungs'. meanwhile a little part of me said 'well, i'm addicted, so there isn't much i can do about it, so its ok to enjoy it', and then i'd be back at 'mmmm, lovely cigarette' ina second or two, while i coughed and spluttered and struggled to breathe- i'd justified my own actions and behaviour and quashed my guilt and focussed on what i wanted to feel, and i'd made it ok.<br><br><br><br>
if this is what you do (i don't know, it might be, might not) i don't think i'm all powerful enough to say if its neccesarily <i>bad</i> for <i>YOU</i> to do it or not, its just something you have chosen to do. you'll know if you feel like its bad or not for you, personally, deep down.<br><br><br><br>
i used to do this with a lot of stuff, but sooner or later my conscience won over and i ended up screwed mentally. when i stopped beleiving myself that i had no choice to not smoke, i couldn't enjoy smoking any more, for example- my justification stopped working for me (cos i knew it was crap, lol) and i had to quit.<br><br><br><br>
ETA: i guess what i'm trying to say is, its ok to like the taste. but if you feel like its not ok to eat it, then ya gotta just not eat it, and forfit the taste. or.... you can eat it, feel a bit guilty, and kinda ignore it and say 'i have no choice/i'm weak/oh well' , cos it tastes nice. like my bf does every day, lol.<br><br><br><br>
i dunno if this came out right or not. its late. i'm tired. and generally don't make a whole bunch of sense anyway. i hope i didnt come across as rude, either. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,227 Posts
My advice: sort it out with your parents. Tell them that you have a moral problem with it, because you're never going to be happy until you can stop eating it. I don't know what your relationship with your parents is like, I don't know what my parents would have done if I went veg at 16. I just feel like you shouldn't have to eat meat if that makes you feel like you're going against your values. Good luck.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
19,873 Posts
If you find yourself enjoying it and want to stop just make a conscious effort to remind yourself what it is. Eventually that feeling should go away. Especially as you're able to find alternative ways to make the same foods you currently enjoy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,260 Posts
I would probably still enjoy meat if I ate it. Like you, I am vegetarian for reasons that have nothing to do with how things taste.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
800 Posts
It's not 'wrong' to like the taste of meat even if you want to be vegetarian, in fact there are probably not many people who become vegetarian purely because they don't like the taste of meat. What will put you off eating it is the fact that you have made the connection between the food on your plate and the living creatures that had to be killed for it to be there - but you already know this, as you say you try not to think about what you are eating.<br><br><br><br>
If you want your parents to stop making you eat meat, then complimenting them on their cooking and eating all the meat they put in front of you is probably not a good idea. If you don't feel you can stand up to your parents just yet about not wanting to eat meat, then maybe if you do think about what you're eating it will give you more incentive to keep trying with them? I know it's hard to stand up to parents when they still have control over you, but it sounds like you'll have to keep trying and keep persisting if you want to be able to eat how you think is right. Good luck with it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,610 Posts
A lot of meat eaters know that the meat they eat comes from animals, and a lot of meat eaters object to it morally-- I'm sure there are plenty of 6 year-olds who are sad because they know Bambi died for them =( they continue to eat meat because people eat meat. Compassion for animals is a very important developmental stage. If this phase is skipped or messed with, the result can be an anti-social human being. The pracitces of the modern meat industry are not compareable with the traditional harvesting of meat through out human history. Most people who are vegetarian because they morally object to the way animals are treated would not object as strongly if the modern meat industry did not exist (meat also would not be available on such a wide scale: to the poor, for instance). This massive cruelty is done behind closed doors, and average people (like your parents) do not realise its scale. I am sure many of the answers gave a lot of ideas you can use to prove to your parents that this is not a phase. Parents are tricky. They are financially liable, and can be held criminally negligent if things happen to you while in their care-- even if they do not know about the things. Until you are independent, you really do not have full control over what you can do. Some minors are lucky to have tolerent hands-off parents, others have intrusive micromanagers-- most have a combination of the two. Your option includes simply trying as much as possible to go meatless without causing undue stress to your house-- I always suggest going ovo/lacto first and also buying mom a vegetarian cookbook with lots of color photos and health and diet information-- Or a subscription of Vegetarian times-- make sure there are lots of pictures to look at. Photos of good looking vegetarian food and descriptions of health benifits are usually good for somewhat influencing people to eat vegetarian. Ovo-lacto is the style of vegetarian most people are (many either one or the other or both). If you go to a restaurant and ask for vegetarian it will usually be loaded with cheese or eggs. You get all the vitamins you need without suppliments, and generally people will eat ovo-lacto without complaining there is not meat. Once you are living on your own you will have full control.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
When I stopped eating meat, I still missed the taste and felt kind of deprived for a couple of months afterwards. It was years before I realized that I wouldn't eat meat even barring ethical concerns, because it's gross - but now I really couldn't do it. The more you think of it as what it is, the less you'll like it.<br><br><br><br>
Nobody has to do what their parents tell them to if their parents are wrong. I know it's hard, but if you feel strongly about certain values... You make the choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
573 Posts
For a lot of people, becoming veg*n doesn't happen overnight. It is a long, sometimes complicated process with many obstacles. You still enjoying the taste of meat I'd say would be an obstacle, as would your parents not allowing you to make this decision.<br><br><br><br>
For the taste thing, I will tell you the same thing Jen and others said- you enjoy the taste of meat because you were raised to enjoy the taste of meat. Just like you were raised to brush your teeth every morning, to say please and thank you, to only urinate in a restroom, etc. It's just a complex that's been built into you. And though it isn't easy, you can deconstruct that complex.<br><br><br><br>
For me personally, it went like this: the more I learned about meat, the less I liked it. I became a vegetarian for health reasons, so the more I learned about nutrition, the more I saw meat for what it really is. It's a dead body. It's totally unnecessary in the human diet. That didn't soak in overnight, but veeerrrrryyyy gradually I got to the point where I'm now, where I couldn't even eat meat if I tried. But don't worry, at one point I was just like you. I ate cheeseburgers and fish sticks just like everyone else and I couldn't really imagine living without them.<br><br><br><br>
About your parents, I'd say the only thing you can really do is educate them. I never really know what to say to teenagers and children who become veg*ns while still living with their folks. I mean, on one hand you have a right to only eat what you feel comfortable eating, but on the other hand, flat out refusing to eat meat can cause so much strife and conflict with parents who are not understanding that it seems like it's not worth it.<br><br><br><br>
So in the meantime, educate them. I'd stay away from the PETA pamphlets and things because people tend to look at those as extreme and be turned off by them. I'd use books, websites, even information like <a href="http://www.foodpyramid.gov" target="_blank">www.foodpyramid.gov</a>, anything to show them that people can be happy and healthy on a veg*n diet. Then see what they say.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I agree with what others have said - you need to sort things out with your parents first. Don't compliment them and don't eat it, this isn't going to get you anywhere. Ultimately, it's a decision you make for yourself and your parents can't stop you if you choose to become veg*n.<br><br><br><br>
They might be worried that they're going to have to do more cooking for you, that veg foods cost more or that you wont be healthy. Show them that you're responsible and set their minds at ease - do extensive research about nutrition, convince them to let you learn how to cook and offer to cook your own meals or volunteer to make veg meals for the family a few times a week, get a part time job to pay for specialty foods if you think you need them.<br><br><br><br>
It's normal to still have cravings for meat. I don't have a problem with the taste of meat but I could never eat it. There are plenty of tasty meat subs out there too.<br><br><br><br>
Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Telling your parents (and other family and friends) can be the hardest part. My parents were understanding of my vegan wishes, but my best friend tried to go veg and her mother started crying. Totally different circumstances... I didn't like red meat before I went veg but that was it. I did it gradually since I was so young (I was 11 and had never even heard of vegetarianism) and I eventully got to vegan. At first I missed the tastes of things but if you just don't eat them, now I can't imagine eating anything with animal products. I can't even eat anything containing gelatin anymore <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
Good luck with going veg and stick with it!
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top