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I don't understand what is going on. About a month ago or so I cooked a whole chicken to eat with family and while I was eating it I had a sudden image in my head of all the things the chicken needs to go through for me to be eating it at that moment. I had to spit it out. I couldn't eat chicken after that. With other meat sometimes I wasn't strong enough to eat it, sometimes I could eat it if I wasn't thinking about it, especially things like McDonalds with tastes that I am very used to. But I can't eat any meat anymore. I just look at it and it looks weird, irrational. I think I shouldn't really be eating this, it doesn't make sense. And then I get disgusted and feel sick. I now reached a point where I can't even try any more. The thought makes me sick. What's going on? Is this a phase? Or should I just give in an be a vegetarian? Anyone had similar experiences? Any suggestions would be much appreciated. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I forgot to say that this got worse and came to breaking point after I got a dog. He is the most loving, amazing creature. I think it is somewhat related to the dog thing. I really can't work this out. I am supposed to be a psychologist. Thanks...
 

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You should become a vegetarian. Sometimes our habits just lag behind our minds. For a few weeks before becoming a vegetarian I would look around at other people eating meat and it just seemed so glaringly wrong to me (even though I was still doing the same thing). I knew that kind of inconsistency in my thoughts and actions was unacceptable so it was part of why I became a vegetarian (and eventually a vegan). If you're on the fence you can always read up on the issue and watch videos about how animals are treated by the meat industry.
 

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To be fair, I don't think there's anyone on this board that would tell you that you shouldn't be a vegetarian, as it's something we all believe in for one reason or another. What you've described, though, is pretty much exactly how I felt before making the change.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Regina_Phalange View Post

But I can't eat any meat anymore. ... The thought makes me sick. What's going on? Is this a phase? Or should I just give in an be a vegetarian? Anyone had similar experiences? Any suggestions would be much appreciated. Thanks.
I'd suggest that you stop eating meat. Just that simple.

Some people would say that that alone makes you a vegetarian, but the talk about "being" a vegetarian implies some sort of quasi-religious conversion or some sort of adoption of an ideology. That's not necessarily so. It's not like being baptized as a Roman Catholic or joining the Communist Party.

What I would suggest is that you contact some pro-vegetarian organizations and get more information about plant-based diets, non-meat recipes, etc.

Please visit the website of the International Vegetarian Union

http://www.ivu.org/

Contact some of the vegetarian organizations in your area.

http://www.ivu.org/results/result2.php?page=1 [Page 1 of 3 pages of listings, 65 organizations listed.]

Also check out info on vegetarian restaurants.

Attend some of their meetings. Meet people in real life.
 

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One of us, One of us.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Regina_Phalange View Post

The thought makes me sick. ... Anyone had similar experiences?
I have not had a similar experience, but I am not particularly an animal lover, and have never had a pet.

But author Carol Adams tells of a somewhat similar experience in one of her books. As a teenager, she was out riding her horse, which she loved. She then came home to dinner, where she bit into a hamburger, and had the same kind of revelation you had. She realized the horse/hamburger conjunction was a contradiction, and she then became a vegetarian.
 

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When I was a kid, I remember being so grossed out by my mother preparing a raw chicken that I never ate any birds after that. It took longer for the other animals. Be a veg, it's the nice thing to do.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Regina_Phalange View Post

I don't understand what is going on.
Actualy it sounds more like for the first time you actualy do understand waht is going on

A mental blockage cleared or a mental disconnect repaired, as it were.

No going back when that happens, so ...

Now, like the chook that you cooked, you are totaly fooked.

Welcome to the asylum btw
 

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I had a similar experience when I became a veggie. I witnessed a mouse being caught in a mouse trap, and I related this incident to my family. Later on, someone was so considerate to bring this story to my attention while eating fish. It was the last time I ate fish (or meat). I just couldn't go on eating animals after actually witnessing the death struggle of a little, tiny mouse. (Not that I've ever had mice for dinner, though =) )
 

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Welcome, Regina!

In the sense that most people don't think that much about what (or whom) they eat, okay- your feelings are unusual. But lots of people eventually make the connection between pets they love and animals they have been eating. Of course, lots of folks who have never had a pet and are not what you would call "animal lovers" become vegetarian for ethical reasons, too!... But for a lot of us, knowing and loving an individual animal really puts a face on the death and suffering meat involves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks everyone, you are all talking sense really... I think having been in training as a psychodynamic therapist for quite some time, some of my most obvious defences are beginning to crumble and the denial involved in eating meat and believing this is normal is one of them. The supermarkets that sell the meat, the whole industry actually, serve as a buffer so that you don't have to do, see or even think about the killing and inflicting pain part. Who would really eat meat if they had to witness animals whimpering in pain, being slaughtered etc., let alone do it themselves? I have never seen videos or anything like that, I don't need to, imagining what it is like is more than enough for me to never touch meat again...

This is going to make things difficult, I am a rubbish cook, I don't know any vegetarian recipes, I have health issues so I need to somehow get my protein etc. but it has to be done. At least I won't have this uneasy horrible feeling before meal times and fill myself up with excessive intake of bread etc. for breakfast (the safe meat-free meal for me) which I am now beginning to see all stem from this underlying lingering aversion to eating meat...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Regina_Phalange View Post

Thanks everyone, you are all talking sense really... I think having been in training as a psychodynamic therapist for quite some time, some of my most obvious defences are beginning to crumble and the denial involved in eating meat and believing this is normal is one of them. The supermarkets that sell the meat, the whole industry actually, serve as a buffer so that you don't have to do, see or even think about the killing and inflicting pain part. Who would really eat meat if they had to witness animals whimpering in pain, being slaughtered etc., let alone do it themselves? I have never seen videos or anything like that, I don't need to, imagining what it is like is more than enough for me to never touch meat again...

This is going to make things difficult, I am a rubbish cook, I don't know any vegetarian recipes, I have health issues so I need to somehow get my protein etc. but it has to be done. At least I won't have this uneasy horrible feeling before meal times and fill myself up with excessive intake of bread etc. for breakfast (the safe meat-free meal for me) which I am now beginning to see all stem from this underlying lingering aversion to eating meat...
There are plenty of people on this forum who know all about this stuff and would be more than willing to help you out.


Welcome to VB!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Regina_Phalange View Post

This is going to make things difficult, I am a rubbish cook, I don't know any vegetarian recipes, I have health issues so I need to somehow get my protein etc. but it has to be done.
It's not quite so difficult as you may think.

Let me recommend four books. I am providing links to Amazon's American site just for informational purposes. You'd have to find where they are available in the UK and/or get them through the library.

The Protein-Powered Vegetarian: From Meat to Vegetable Protein [Paperback]

Bo Sebastian

http://www.amazon.com/Protein-Powere...0646756&sr=1-1

The Vegetarian Way: Total Health for You and Your Family [Paperback]

Virginia Messina (Author), Mark Messina (Author)

http://www.amazon.com/Vegetarian-Way...0647205&sr=1-1

The New Becoming Vegetarian: The Essential Guide To A Healthy Vegetarian Diet by Vesanto Melina and Brenda Davis

http://www.amazon.com/New-Becoming-V...0647328&sr=1-1

Becoming Vegan: The Complete Guide to Adopting a Healthy Plant-Based Diet [Paperback]

Brenda Davis (Author), Vesanto Melina (Author)

http://www.amazon.com/Becoming-Vegan...0647493&sr=1-2

The last three books are written by people with Registered Dietician certifications or other advanced degrees in nutrition. Excellent reference books, and practical, too.
 

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Here are four articles about protein in vegetarian (in this case, vegan) diets. The first is by Ginny Messina, R.D., whose book I recommended above, and the last three by her colleague Jack Norris, R.D.

Vegan Food Guide, Protein, and New Book

http://www.theveganrd.com/2011/01/ve...-new-book.html

Quote:
I've also been giving lots of thought to protein because-no doubt about it-I've had ex-vegans on the brain over the past few months. I've wanted to focus on what can go wrong with veganism, and how we can do everything possible to make sure that all vegans and aspiring vegans have access to the safest nutrition information possible. And when people experience deficiencies on a vegan diet, we need to be able to help them increase nutrient intake from plant sources.

...
To ensure that vegans meet needs for protein and lysine, I recommend a minimum of three servings per day of legumes. A serving is ½ cup of beans or soyfood or 1 cup of soymilk. This is a fairly generous amount-more than some people require-but it leaves room for some low-protein foods in your diet-fruits, fats, and treats.
Protein

http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/protein

How can I get plant protein without eating soy?

http://jacknorrisrd.com/?p=209

Response to CCF: Protein for Vegan Teens

http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/ccf0209protein

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The Center for Consumer Freedom says that it's not easy for vegan teens to meet their protein needs. The study from Sweden indicates that it's not too difficult; but it does require knowing which foods are high in protein and making sure to incorporate them into your diet.
The bolded words link to the third article referenced above.

Americans seem to prefer the word "legumes" where people in the UK seem to prefer the word "pulses."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulses
 

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Welcome!!!

I had a similar thing happen to me. One day just over 5 years ago, a normal day like any other, I ordered a chicken sandwich from Subway. I sat down and bit into it. All of a sudden, mid-chew, a lightbulb went on. I realized I was eating FLESH, the dead body of an animal. It was like I was hit by a bus of disgust, I spat the chicken out, threw the whole sandwich in the garbage, and left. I was repulsed and spent the whole rest of the day rattled and uneasy. When I got home I did an internet search and found all kinds of awful info on the meat industry, and so many awesome vegetarian recipes.

I never looked back, not for one second. Not a bite of meat after that moment. It changed my life, I became a vegan, an activist and an environmentalist and it was sort of a spiral into a happier way of being... as I am now more aligned with my principles (and my health is much better, too)


I never really liked meat as a child (chicken drumsticks wigged me out, and the fat on steaks made me gag), and I have always been a huge animal lover. Maybe it was years in the making


Sounds to me like you had an epiphany, don't fight it! Learn as much as you can, watch videos, read books, pick up some cookbooks. Come here if you need advice on recipes, cruelty-free shopping, dealing with friends and family, animal rights info... anything veg related you can find help or advice. You're not alone!

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe View Post

It's not quite so difficult as you may think.

Let me recommend four books. I am providing links to Amazon's American site just for informational purposes. You'd have to find where they are available in the UK and/or get them through the library.

The Protein-Powered Vegetarian: From Meat to Vegetable Protein [Paperback]

Bo Sebastian

http://www.amazon.com/Protein-Powere...0646756&sr=1-1

The Vegetarian Way: Total Health for You and Your Family [Paperback]

Virginia Messina (Author), Mark Messina (Author)

http://www.amazon.com/Vegetarian-Way...0647205&sr=1-1

The New Becoming Vegetarian: The Essential Guide To A Healthy Vegetarian Diet by Vesanto Melina and Brenda Davis

http://www.amazon.com/New-Becoming-V...0647328&sr=1-1

Becoming Vegan: The Complete Guide to Adopting a Healthy Plant-Based Diet [Paperback]

Brenda Davis (Author), Vesanto Melina (Author)

http://www.amazon.com/Becoming-Vegan...0647493&sr=1-2

The last three books are written by people with Registered Dietician certifications or other advanced degrees in nutrition. Excellent reference books, and practical, too.
I have bookmarked this book (The Vegetarian Way) as it will most certainly help me, as I'm finding it difficult to get enough protein. I don't want to overload with beans and too many pulses.

However the 1st book didn't have any decent reviews and it states that it is a book for newbies without any cooking knowledge. I'm not too sure whether that it exact so have chosen not to order it.

Thank you for posting.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shyvas View Post

I have bookmarked this book (The Vegetarian Way) as it will most certainly help me, as I'm finding it difficult to get enough protein. I don't want to overload with beans and too many pulses.
See also the four web-based articles on protein mentioned in post # 17 above.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shyvas View Post

However the 1st book didn't have any decent reviews
It got 7 5-star reviews out of 9 .


Quote:
Originally Posted by Shyvas View Post

and it states that it is a book for newbies without any cooking knowledge.
It was primarily recommended to the OP, who is a newbie and stated she is "a rubbish cook."


Quote:
Originally Posted by Shyvas View Post

I'm not too sure whether that it exact so have chosen not to order it.
That's fine. However, more information about the book, and five sample recipes, can be gotten free on the author's website here:

http://www.bosebastian.com/Cookbook.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shyvas View Post

Thank you for posting.
You are welcome. Please be aware that the authors of the last two books also have websites that are worth visiting. I just did not have the URLs at my fingertips at the time I wrote the post.

See:

http://www.nutrispeak.com/newbecomingvegetarian.htm

On protein:

http://www.nutrispeak.com/EatingForHealth.htm
http://www.nutrispeak.com/GasCrisis.htm
http://www.nutrispeak.com/SummerBBQ.htm
 
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