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A friend recently moved to a new house with a small yard. (He used to have a very large yard.) And he has a 6 yr old male lab (fixed).<br><br><br><br>
During the day, when my friend is at work, the dog barks some, not a lot imo, but one of his neighbors has started to complain. Mostly, the dog barks if he sees a delivery truck, or other dogs being walked. The problem he is LOUD.<br><br><br><br>
Is there a way to get the dog to stop barking so much?<br><br><br><br>
Also, when I walk the dog, he is very good until he sees another dog and then he'll try very hard to pull me over to the other dog. He wants to go say "Hi" I guess...but, he is very strong and I can barely hold him back.<br><br><br><br>
Is there anyway to get him to stop doing this?<br><br><br><br>
Thank you!
 

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Wearing him out before work might help some because he'll be likely to sleep. But obviously he's still going to get up and bark if he hears a truck or another dog go by.<br><br><br><br>
If the big baby neighbor is really going to cause trouble over it, maybe try a citronella collar. I think you can get them at fosterandsmith.com. It will spray citronella scent when he barks, which most dogs don't like. It's much kinder than a collar that shocks him every time he barks. But I think even a shock collar as a last resort is better than getting rid of the dog over barking.<br><br><br><br>
What kind of collar are you trying to walk him with? If he's not been trained at all, it will be next to impossible for a small person to walk a lab with just a regular collar. Maybe try the Illusion sold by Cesar Millan or the Scruffy guider, which I have for my huskies. I'll post the sites below. The Illusion costs more but also comes with a leash. I haven't tried it myself because it wasn't available yet when I was looking for my dogs.<br><br><br><br>
You could also try a Gentle Leader or Halti, which are head collars and look like the halters used for horses. A dog automatically walks the direction his head is facing and head collars give you control of his head. I personally like the Gentle Leader better because it also has a snap that you fasten to his regular collar. That way if he gets the collar off his head by pawing at it (and some dogs learn how to do that extremely fast!) he's still attached to the leash and not loose. Foster and Smith sells both. And no, I'm not a spokesperson for Foster and Smith. They're just often much cheaper than Petco, even with paying for shipping.<br><br><br><br>
Or you could use a prong collar. If used properly, they're not elements of torture the way some dog trainers will have you believe. I can honestly say before I ever put one on a dog, I tried it on myself first and tugged on it the same way you would on a dog. The fine folks selling them that day looked at me like I was nuts. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"> If you do try a prong collar, make sure he wears it just behind his ears and not low on the neck where a regular flat collar fits, which is the strongest part of a dog's neck. You can get a prong collar from Foster and Smith or Petco or Petsmart.<br><br><br><br>
He basically needs obedience training to learn to walk properly and not pull, but with a dog that big you just about need a training collar to do it with. At least I do. Has he been to obedience classes?<br><br><br><br>
When you're walking him and he pulls, stop. Wait until he looks back at you, offer him a treat, then start walking a different direction. If he starts to pull again, repeat. It might take a while, but he'll eventually learn to pay attention to you. Dogs pull because it works. Usually their human gives up and lets them go to whatever they're pulling towards. So they learn pulling pays off.<br><br><br><br>
One of my huskies now keeps his eyes on my pocket if he knows I have treats. That alone is enough to keep him from pulling me down the street most of the time. The other one would rather pull than eat treats. She'd rather pull than breathe I think. She wears a doggie backpack and carries weights when we walk. That might be an idea for your friend's lab too. Giving him a job to do will use up part of the energy he's using for pulling. I don't know if foster and smith sells backpacks or not. I got mine from ebay.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://cesarmillan.securesites.net/index.php?cPath=24" target="_blank">http://cesarmillan.securesites.net/index.php?cPath=24</a><br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.mistypinesdogpark.com/store/product.php?productid=16507&cat=249&page=1" target="_blank">http://www.mistypinesdogpark.com/sto...cat=249&page=1</a><br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.drsfostersmith.com/default.cfm?cm_mmc=Television-_-GoldenIcon-_-2006-_-Branding&ref=3787&subref=AA" target="_blank">http://www.drsfostersmith.com/defaul...3787&subref=AA</a>
 

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Sounds like he's not been socialized to much with other dogs. Or it could be that he is just naturally feeling like he's protecting. It's probably the later. In any event, there's not much you can do in my opinion. Dogs are going to communicate and when they do they bark.
 

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there are humaine anti-bark collars available that either beep, vibrate, or spray citronella when the dog wearing them barks. they go off and distract the dog from what it was barking at. i used one of the ones that beeps with my dog and it worked like a charm. after a few weeks any time i would put it on him he knew that it was time to do something quietly and would go chew a toy or something.<br><br><br><br>
now on the rare occasions that he gets barky all i have to do is ask him if he wants to wear his collar in a stern voice and he stops <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>delicious</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
A friend recently moved to a new house with a small yard. (He used to have a very large yard.) And he has a 6 yr old male lab (fixed).<br><br><br><br>
During the day, when my friend is at work, the dog barks some, not a lot imo, but one of his neighbors has started to complain. Mostly, the dog barks if he sees a delivery truck, or other dogs being walked. The problem he is LOUD.<br><br><br><br>
Is there a way to get the dog to stop barking so much?<br><br><br><br>
Also, when I walk the dog, he is very good until he sees another dog and then he'll try very hard to pull me over to the other dog. He wants to go say "Hi" I guess...but, he is very strong and I can barely hold him back.<br><br><br><br>
Is there anyway to get him to stop doing this?<br><br><br><br>
Thank you!</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
I found this out by mistake one day walking a neighbors dog. She's a puller too. The leash some how had gotten under her belly and because ofthe pressure it was putting on her pelvic region she quit pulling since the feeling was uncomfortable to her. Have had a chance to see if it works on male dogs or for that matter on other dogs in general but it did work on Libby.<br><br><br><br>
Good luck with the dog, sounds like your friend needs to start working with his/her dog.
 

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Be careful with any collar that does anything when he barks. I got one that beeps for my dog and it didn't occur to me, until after my poor dog was traumatized, that it picked up on neighbors dogs barking, as well as any other similar sounds. So it was going off constantly, even when he didn't bark. So if you use that make sure there are no other barking dogs around.
 
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