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Are you sure it's ADD and not just general stress/disorganization? A lot, if not most, adults have what you are describing - disorganization, tardiness, stress, a feeling of having too much on one's plate...<br><br><br><br>
A lifestyle of stress & randomness can be hard on anyone. You might first look into personal organization. And I don't mean getting a day planner, but creating a schedule for your days to create routine, and stick to it. And looking at ways to reduce stress (are you taking too many credits and working a high number of hours?)
 

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a lot of adults and kids that i know with ADD/ADHD are also sugar free, some are gluten and dairy free (it's a trigger for some), others are also completely flour free (eating only whole grains such as boiled rice, barley, aramanth, etc), and most are dye/chemical free in their foods. These things might also help you.<br><br><br><br>
Good luck with everything! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks zoebird.. I'd heard things about diet helping, that will be my next step.. especially now that school's done for the semester I can work on eating more whole foods/less sugar and gluten. I'm already dairy-free.<br><br><br><br>
OregonAmy, I hadn't thought much about ADHD since I've pretty much always been stressed out and overworked, but when I started to do research on the subject there were a lot of things that jumped out at me. I have a lot of trouble paying attention when I'm not interested in something and I have a tendency to start tuning out while people are talking, no matter how hard I try to listen. In addition to everything I mentioned before, there were symptoms/behaviors that I have that I never would have associated with ADHD... reversing letters and numbers frequently while writing, difficulty waking up and periods of tiredness throughout the day no matter how much sleep I get, losing and misplacing things frequently(I have to check for my keys twice every time I get out of my car, I've locked them inside and had to wait for AAA twice in the past year), mood swings, impulse spending.. the hardest for me to deal with and the reason why I started doing research in the first place are the feelings that nothing will ever work out for me and that I'm not reaching my full potential. No one should ever have to think it's normal to feel like this constantly. And the fact that most of the symptoms are things I've had going on since childhood is very indicative of ADHD, it's not something that just develops when you are an adult.. I read one article on ADHD in gifted children which basically described my elementary school experience, it made sense of a lot of things for me and explained why my parents and teachers never would have thought to have me tested as either ADHD or gifted.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ADizzyGirl</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I have a lot of trouble paying attention when I'm not interested in something and I have a tendency to start tuning out while people are talking, no matter how hard I try to listen... reversing letters and numbers frequently while writing, difficulty waking up and periods of tiredness throughout the day no matter how much sleep I get, losing and misplacing things frequently... mood swings, impulse spending.... feelings that nothing will ever work out for me and that I'm not reaching my full potential.</div>
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That sounds like normal adulthood to me.<br><br><br><br>
But, definitely go get checked out. And eating a healthy diet low in processed foods can't hurt anyone.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ADizzyGirl</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
In addition to everything I mentioned before, there were symptoms/behaviors that I have that I never would have associated with ADHD... reversing letters and numbers frequently while writing, difficulty waking up and periods of tiredness throughout the day no matter how much sleep I get, losing and misplacing things frequently(I have to check for my keys twice every time I get out of my car, I've locked them inside and had to wait for AAA twice in the past year), mood swings, impulse spending.. the hardest for me to deal with and the reason why I started doing research in the first place are the feelings that nothing will ever work out for me and that I'm not reaching my full potential.</div>
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I agree with OregonAmy. You've mentioned a few things that make me think you're in your early 20's [correct me if I'm wrong]. I'm only 25 -- but things have significantly settled in the last couple of years. From 18-22 I felt the same way as you. At least for me, it was from taking on a lot more responsibilities. Moving out, getting a job, keeping up with school -- it can stress you out and exhaust you. And stress can do some funny things: make you tired, spacey, forgetful. I thought I might have ADHD at one point too but after setting a daily schedule for myself, getting back to eating right and starting meditation (or at least setting 20 minutes or so every evening to just turn off the TV, put away the books, unplug from everything and just sit).<br><br><br><br>
That last point was a huge one for me. We live in such a fast paced world, just living can sometimes make you feel scattered. TV, computers, information -- it's constant. Especially for a student! You're getting it from all sides when your in school. It can really screw with your head. Try unplugging from everything nightly -- even if you can only manage 10 minutes. That alone can bring your focus back.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ADizzyGirl</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
No one should ever have to think it's normal to feel like this constantly.</div>
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Completely agreed. By all means see a doc but consider slowing down, taking some time for yourself to unwind if you don't already. Don't misinterpret my next comment wrong, because I fully believe there are a time and place for<br><br>
psych drugs -- depression and in some cases ADHD. A lot of the time though, I think people drug themselves for ADHD to try and keep up with an unnaturally high-paced, information-intensive life. I wanted to try everything natural first and after some time and patience, I found something that worked for me. Your case may be different and I think seeing a doc would be good [especially because you said "reversing letters and numbers frequently while writing" -- that sounds more like a reading disability than ADHD, but maybe I'm wrong].
 

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I have adult ADD, was diagnosed when I was a kid though. reversing numbers - not all the time by any means, but once in a while, yuppers - often in streaks where I have trouble getting a whole phone number down.<br><br><br><br>
ADD however is more than having trouble focusing when you're not interested in something. its having trouble focusing at all, on most anything. Sure, you can hyperfocus every once in a while but its not an easy state to attain. Its not hearing your husband talk to you when you're watching TV - literally not hearing him speak. Its wanting to cry because you have a deadline and you simply cannot get focused. Its losing your keys - and pretty much anything else you touch - every day.... more than once, lol. Its also wanting to support a friend who is upset on the phone and losing track of what she's saying. It can be funny at times, but its usually horrifically upsetting.<br><br><br><br>
I'm not saying you don't have ADD either - but having struggled with it for 20 years I can't imagine getting to college without knowing earlier. I know it happens, but you definitley want to try natural remedies before the prescription drugs. The drugs work GREAT but have nasty side effects. And, now that I'm pregnant, I can't take them at all, and it makes work really hard. (trust me, pregnancy mind + ADD mind = most scattered possible mind lol.) I stopped taking them before I tried to conceive of course.<br><br><br><br>
I kinda agree that it could just be normal adulthood. College years are crazy and really hard to manage. Everyone feels like they dont know what they are doing, is overtired and all screwed up in their schedules.... but that doesn't mean you have ADHD. But that you're trying to figure things out, and come to understand your feelings and address them, is definitely a good thing. You might not need a diagnosis - you might need just to do some soul searching.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I dunno, I still feel like too many of the symptoms described in multiple sources mirror my life to just write it off as coincidence.<br><br><br><br>
At any rate, at least I've made the psych appointment.. I seriously DO NOT think it is normal to feel this way, whether it's ADHD or something else causing it. Being up until 2 or 3 am sobbing because I just can't finish an assignment that I could have had done by 9 if I were a normal person with an attention span sucks, when it happens on average once or twice a week it is hell. If this is truly "just normal adulthood", I am just not cut out to be a normal adult.
 

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ADizzyGirl, trust me... a lot of us have been up an entire night, upset with ourselves that we put off an assignment till the last night... I'll never forget writing an 8-page paper & starting it at midnight the morning before it was due. I was so mad at myself.<br><br><br><br>
All because I kept starting on one topic & getting distracted.<br><br><br><br>
It's a part of growing up and finding your independence. It sucks and that's why so many people find their late teens/early 20s to be so hard.<br><br><br><br>
But, most of us get through it and graduate and get jobs... and struggle with the same issues. I am 31 and I still find it hard to get organized enough to get to work on time. My apartment isn't clean, I forget stuff everywhere (ask remilard), I put things off till the last minute.... it's just a part of living. But you develop coping skills to deal with it. Some people are better than others, some are worse. Don't let it get to you so much - you don't have to be perfect, you don't have to remember everything, and you don't have to pay attention to every detail.<br><br><br><br>
Take a course or talk to a counselor on learning to concentrate/study/organize. Yes, they teach classes on that. A friend of mine took a class on how to take notes! It is something that doesn't come naturally and I still don't have the skill (nor do many others). But if you can develop habits to help, you'll get there. Good luck.
 

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I'm pretty easily distracted, too. I get up to go get some water and end up doing the dishes. I'll get up to pee, and end up taking a shower. I have a list of phone calls I need to make. I wake up, look at it, ignore it and sit down to check my email. If I'm watching a movie and it is incredibly boring to me, my mind will wander onto more interesting things.<br><br>
I don't even remotely think I have ADD/ADHD. I think I, like most people, don't want to pay attention to things that bore me. We don't want to do things we don't want to do. We find other things to do, and usually they're things that need to be done anyway.<br><br><br><br>
Hell, in that paragraph, I originally typed "I don't think I I have a list of phone calls I have to make" When my thought was "I don't think I have ADD. I have a list of phone calls I have to make..."<br><br>
Ooh, and I typed "<b>I</b>, like most people, don't want to pay attention to things that bore <b>us</b>"<br><br><br><br>
ETA: I had a good 6 months of a weekly study group, and like 2 months of on-my-own time before taking the national written interpreter certification test. Besides my one hour weekly study group, and during that entire 2 months I had on my own, I didn't crack a book until the night before I was scheduled to take the test. Now it's been 10 months since I took that portion of the test. I've had a bunch of study materials for the performance/interview portion for about 8 months now. I haven't even opened the binder. And I probably wont until February or March, when I take the 2nd part. I won't remember anything unless I read it shortly before the test.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>OregonAmy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
ADizzyGirl, trust me... a lot of us have been up an entire night, upset with ourselves that we put off an assignment till the last night... I'll never forget writing an 8-page paper & starting it at midnight the morning before it was due. I was so mad at myself.<br><br><br><br>
All because I kept starting on one topic & getting distracted.<br></div>
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So true!!! I just pulled that off this past monday. I had all semester to put a 40 minute presentation together and i start on it at 8am when i have to give the talk at 6pm.
 

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as the OP has deleted her posts, I'm gonna close this thread.<br><br><br><br>
ADizzyGirl, if you read this, I hope you find the help you're looking for. I'm sorry you didn't find it here... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":(">
 
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