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My husband has finally agreed to let me adopt a cat <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"> I've contacted the shelter we got hubby's cat from to see if they had any that would be suitable for us (we were after a young female who could be an indoor cat,since we live in a penthouse)Anway, they have one who sounds ideal, she's a beautiful 3 month old female, but there is a but.She was found abandoned with a very badly broken leg, it's been operated on & she now had a 'floating joint' which <i>may</i> require treatment as she gets older. We're going to visit her at the weekend, but now i'm not sure if it's too big a comitment. My mum's cat got hit by a car last year & his pelvis was broken in 7 places & recovered brilliantly, but of course not all cats are going to recover as well.I'm just feeling a bit anxious about the whole thing really, i'd hate to fall in love with her & then be told she is going to require lots of costly medical procedres in the future - there is always the option of getting her insured incase of future problems, but i'm sure the premiums would be huge given her injuries.<br><br>
Eek, i'm just a bit worked up about it really, has anyone had any experience with such injuries in cats? Or does anyone have any advice for me? thank you <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Sorry if it sounds horrible, but if the cats going to need years of surgery on the leg would it be possible to just amputate it, seems cheaper and a lot less pain on the cat. guess thats the shelters choice more than yours!
 

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If you connect with her I would take her. Getting one that is healthy now is no guarantee they won't need expensive health care in the future, you just know where you're likely to have problems with this one.
 

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We have a "special needs" cat. He had a upper respiratory problem when we found him, which turned out to be chronic, and he also almost died of pancreatitis. We've spent thousands (yikes!) on treatments, medications and prescription food for him, but we really do see it as worth it. He's a great little guy.<br><br><br><br>
My advice to you would be to decide whether you have the financial means to take care of the cat. Would you be willing to spend thousands on her? Because it might come to that. It would be horrible to fall in love with her and then find yourself in a position where you can't afford to give her necessary medical attention.
 

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When I was little, our old cat died, and our few-year-old cat was lonely, so we adopted a kitten from an organization that rescues strays. We went to this cat "foster home" and met a litter of kittens and we played with them all and we all wanted this one really sweet kitten, but she had a hurt foot so my parents didn't want to adopt a cat with a potential medical problem, so we picked another instead. The next day, the cat we did adopt jumped off of a high place in the house and hurt her foot. (She fully recovered and lived to be about 17.) The moral of this story is... you may adopt a healthy cat and it turns out to be no better off than the cat you passed up.<br><br><br><br>
A lot of times with leg bone issues, it's easier to have the cat's leg amputated, and they do just fine on 3 legs (at least as indoor cats). However, that isn't inexpensive either, but at least it isn't a long string of expensive surgeries, it's a one time deal. Definitely look into pet insurance and see what they would cover for her. Some pet insurances consider conditions "cured" after a period of time and will then cover them, so, for example, if she has no leg problems for 2 yrs, then has them again, insurance would cover it like it never happened.<br><br><br><br>
It's a tough decision, for sure. I've seen kittens with crushed pelvises, diaphramatic hernias, deformed legs, and all manner of other things recover with no complications or future health problems, but certainly not all cats are that lucky. I'm sure whatever you do it will be in the best interest of both you and the cat.
 

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I think we rehomed one with a floating patella once. Some (or all) of the usual addoption fee was waived to take into account the fact that he was on meds at the time and was likely to need an opperation in the future. As I understood it, the opperation was not a terribly risky one, and follow up opperations were not thought to be necessary. There was a reasonable chance that if he was kept from jumping down off high surfaces, the op could be postponed for years, and might never be necessary.<br><br>
These are all things you should discuss with the resuce organization (or a trusted vet, depending on how much they are able to tell you).<br><br>
How likely is it that the opperation will need doing?<br><br>
Will it just be a one off, or are you probably looking at follow up ops throughout its life?<br><br>
How risky is the proposed surgery?<br><br>
Are you going to have to make significant changes to your home in order to manage the injury without / following surgery?<br><br>
Does the presence of the condition in one leg indicate a predisposition to the problem for other legs, or are they as healthy as any other cat's?<br><br><br><br>
Re: amputation. The vet was discussing this for my cat a couple of years ago, but I didnt think she would cope well with it and insisted it was absolutely the last resort. He said that most cats (particularly if they are done younger and all the other legs are healthy) adjust well to life with 3 legs. For an indoor cat, this is even more likely to be the case as it doesnt need the leg so much for fence climbing and fighting off intruders. Obviously I am not recommending that you have it done in place of simple surgery if that is allthat is required, but if you go ahead with the adoption and later find yourself looking at a long line of surgerys under anaesthetic in the future, it is good to know your options.
 

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I'd talk to a vet and ask about what complications could come from a floating joint (just call one up and ask the question). With information about this specific injury, you'll have be able to make your decision easier.<br><br><br><br>
I just found out that one of my cats has heart disease. I'm giving him aspirin every other day now, but he may eventually need blood pressure meds and/or diuretics for congestive heart failure. He's been healthy for years and this problems surfaced recently. I see it as just part of taking care of my fur-baby. (But, honestly, I draw the line at heart surgery. I'll just make him comfortable with medications as long as I can.)
 

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You could give that cat a very happy life, you can talk to the vet and discuss with him what is the best for the cat.<br><br>
I have two cats, they were both rescued, and they were very poorly, I need to medicate one of them every day, but I don't mind the commitment at all. All my cats are rescued, I used to have four, unfortunatelly two of them died because of illnesses, but I was happy to have them, no matter what!
 

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What I would do if it were me is I'd talk to a vet. Of course, the vet doesn't have a crystal ball, but he can give you an idea of what to expect. What's the worst case scenario? Could I handle it financially as well as emotionally? If I could, I'd adopt the cat because, what are her chances that someone else would even consider her?
 

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Please don't call you vet with a question about something as vague as "floating joint". Which leg and which joint? Is this an FHO? (FHO=femoral head osteotomy- removal of the head of the femur)<br><br><br><br>
If they mean FHO, most smaller animals have few problems later in life if they are kept calmer and at an ideal weight. They may develop some arthritis issues due to abnormal wieght distrubution, posture and gait. The body forms a connective tissue "sling" to support the body. I've seen larger dogs that have had the procedure and they still do fairly well. This is the most common type of non-bony joint that is artificially made (the scapula to body is a natural one).
 
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