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Hello all, I am writing another post so that I might be able to get some answers for a few things I have noticed, since starting last week. Any help would be amazing.<br><br>
1) BIGGEST question: Protein.....A lot of body-building/fitness mags will say that for maximum growth, one should take in about a gram of protein per day, per pound of body weight. For me, that is 187 grams of protein a day. Contrast this to a few vegan books I have read that say that most people take in too much protein, and 30-40 grams is sufficient. Which one is correct? Should I supplement my vegan diet with protein shakes to add protein if I want to look well-built? Keep in mind that I am training for a triathlon currently. I just don't want to lose muscle. Losing the fat is part of the point! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
2) Gas. When does this go away? DOES this go away? I am going to be STARTING fires pretty soon I think.<br><br>
3) Supplementation: Anything other than B12 needed?<br><br>
4) Are there sites for good veg restaurants? My old sites don't even have a spot for it.<br><br>
5) How much is my girlfriend going to flip out when I really explain all of this? For now, it is just a "new training diet".... I had to make her steak last night (I am the cook, nearly always), while I had an incredible eggplant lasagna. I realize this is an unknowable question, but how did others' family/friends respond?<br><br>
6) And just for a fun story....had my first, "Wait, YOU'RE a vegan?!" moment last night. Was talking to a woman and a few of her friends at a fundraiser, and they brought up the fact that there was meatless baked ziti at the function. (It was, "I can't imagine firemen are usually vegetarians.") To which I responded, "well, myself and that guy over there are."<br><br>
I think the idea of what is supposed to be a hyper-masculine professional being a vegan did not occur to them....not to mention we are both tall, tattooed, shaved-heads, etc....it was all rather entertaining. Gotta represent, haha <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">
 

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1) I think 60-90 g. of protein per day is reasonable for me as a vegan (female) athlete. I get it all from fruits and vegetables, a few nuts/seeds, so it's doable without a ton of soy, gluten, or powders. What's very important to understand is that you need to eat ENOUGH calories and also that as you lose fat around your muscles, your muscles MAY appear to be smaller, but really it's the fat loss. Keep lifting weights and eating enough.<br><br>
2) Maybe cut down on processed foods and/or soy and see how you do. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> What are you eating?<br><br>
3) If you don't get enough sunlight, then vitamin D is something to look into. Eat enough leafy green vegetables (1 lb. per day or more)<br><br>
4) happycow.net and vegetarian-restaurants.net<br><br>
5) I don't see how anyone, even you, could predict your girlfriend's response. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"><br><br>
6) I've had comments, too, that insinuate that an omnivore would look "better" or "healthier" or more muscular than a vegan, and to be honest, it's usually not the case in my experience, when you take into account vegans who eat a lot of produce and actually exercise.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/hi.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":hi:"><br>
Good luck!
 

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I base my protein intake at 1.2-1.8g per kilo (2.2lbs) So on this basis, i think you should be aiming for between 102-153g of protein a day. I am aware that people in the US don't use kilograms as measurement of weight, and therefore probably consume too much protein. I also believe that 30-40g protein a day is far too low even for a sedentary person.
 

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It's 1 gram of protein per kilogram of body-weight, not pound.<br><br>
If you're trying to maintain your current muscle mass, I wouldn't think protein supplementation necessary. However, if you're trying to increase your muscle mass, then, you should do supplementation. The RDA of protein for someone 185 lbs is about 68 g.<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">"The American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports medicine, in their joint position paper, "Nutrition and Athletic Performance" (December 2000), advise endurance atheles to get about 1.2 to 1.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. For a brief period of time during the early stages of training, when muscle mass is increasing and protein needs are highest, athletes may aim for as much as 2 to 2.3 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight."<br><br>
Melina, V., MS, RD, & Davis, B., RD. <i>The New Becoming Vegetarian: The Essential Guide to Healthy Vegetarian Diet</i></div>
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1) If you eat enough calories (and a variety of foods) you will get enough protein. Most foods have some protein, don't forget to calculate the bits in veggies and grains when figuring out your intake. For triathlon training its best not to be too bulky with muscle mass bc you have to be able to literally carry yourself long distances, I understand not wanting to lose tone but you shouldn't be wanting to bulk up while training for a triathlon. so you don't really need the shakes or protein supplementations.<br>
If you are still interested in body building here is a good source: <a href="http://www.veganbodybuilding.org/home.htm" target="_blank">http://www.veganbodybuilding.org/home.htm</a><br><br>
2) Digestion is different (like 100 times better) on a vegan diet. you may have an intolerance or allergy if the gas is that bad and constant. I avoid soy bc it messes with my digestion pretty bad. if you suspect it may be a certain food (like you notice more gas after eating it) try eliminating it and seeing if the problems still exist. Also it is important to soak you dried beans, this helps tremendously with digestion. as well as drinking enough water.<br><br>
3) Eating fortified foods regularly is also another option to taking b12 supplements.<br><br>
4) not sure where you are but meetup.com is a good source for finding local veg groups and places to eat.<br><br>
5) Everyone is different, you know your gf better than us so you probably have a clue as to how she will react. My bf was cool with it, however he didn't touch my vegan food for nearly 5 years and is barely this past year transitioning to eating mostly vegetarian. it takes time for people to adjust to changes. at first I cooked his food and my food, then we slowly got into a routing where he would cook whatever animal he wanted to eat while i prepared the main part of the dinner, it worked well as I didn't have to deal with meat and saved time not cooking 2 different meals everynight.
 

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There are a few schools of thought about protein intake. I'm with the one that believes that too much protein is not good for your kidneys (renal overload) or your bone density (osteoporosis) over the long term. I think that protein supplements are an unnecessary money-making concern for the manufacturers. Good luck finding a vegan one (many contain whey) that doesn't taste like ****. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>FirePheonix</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2926584"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
1) BIGGEST question: Protein.....A lot of body-building/fitness mags will say that for maximum growth, one should take in about a gram of protein per day, per pound of body weight. For me, that is 187 grams of protein a day. Contrast this to a few vegan books I have read that say that most people take in too much protein, and 30-40 grams is sufficient. Which one is correct? Should I supplement my vegan diet with protein shakes to add protein if I want to look well-built? Keep in mind that I am training for a triathlon currently. I just don't want to lose muscle. Losing the fat is part of the point! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
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You're finding an inconsistency where there isn't one. Just ask yourself this: are most people body-builders? No. Body-building is a specific kind of sport that requires more protein than many other sports. Also, most people aren't any kind of athlete, they just work and play. The amount of protein you need depends on the kinds of things you do.<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">2) Gas. When does this go away? DOES this go away? I am going to be STARTING fires pretty soon I think.</div>
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Depends on your body and what you're eating. There are things you can do to minimize it, like soaking and rinsing all your beans very well. Or you can try a vegan beano product.<br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">3) Supplementation: Anything other than B12 needed?</div>
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Depends on where you live and your lifestyle. You might want to take a vitamin D supplement, but since you're training for a triathlon I bet you're outdoors a lot and you might already be getting plenty of D from the sun. Some people need to supplement with calcium or iron or other things but it really just depends on you and your body. A good way to see how you're doing is to track your food intake with a food diary and then plug it into one of those programs to see what you're eating. Look at a week's worth of food or maybe 3 weeks worth. Don't just pick one day though because that won't give you an accurate picture. You can also have your blood tested to see what's in your system and if any deficiencies show up. Some tests are cheaper and easier than others so look into that with a doctor.<br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">4) Are there sites for good veg restaurants? My old sites don't even have a spot for it.</div>
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happycow.net and vegguide.org<br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">5) How much is my girlfriend going to flip out when I really explain all of this? For now, it is just a "new training diet".... I had to make her steak last night (I am the cook, nearly always), while I had an incredible eggplant lasagna. I realize this is an unknowable question, but how did others' family/friends respond?</div>
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My husband and I were set up on a blind date because we were vegetarian. Turned out he still ate fishes so I hassled him about that. Years later I asked, "Want to go vegan?" and he said yes. Easy peasy <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>FirePheonix</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2926584"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I think the idea of what is supposed to be a hyper-masculine professional being a vegan did not occur to them....not to mention we are both tall, tattooed, shaved-heads, etc....it was all rather entertaining. Gotta represent, haha <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"></div>
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lolz. Did you tell her that burning bodies smell like pig? No, wait, never mind not a good conversation piece.<br><br><br>
I don't supplement anything and from what I've read you don't need to. Most of the protein/b12 information out there is misinformed. Long term studies of vegans with NO dietary source of b12 showed that their b12 levels maintained a healthy level. How? I don't know. Cases of b12 deficiency in vegans had underlying causes (things that prevented the absorption of b12) that can affect non vegans as well. I know a lot of people have trouble believing this because even medical texts have carried misinformation for quite some time, but do what you want, most commercial soymilks are fortified with b12 anyway. As for protein, as long as you get enough calories (in general) you'll get enough protein. Nitrogen balance tests showed that subjects eating ONLY POTATOES had a sufficient protein intake.
 

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1) No one really knows about protein, diet in general is a very difficult thing to get scientific about because there's so many factors. The most general consensus seems to be about 50g/day for men and 40-45g/day for women. For professional athletes etc, you'd prob want a little more. Contrary to how it's portrayed, there is protein in EVERYTHING. spinach, peas and broccoli are some of the vegetables w/ more protein. It may seem like there is less protein in vegetables, but it's usually because the calorie content is so low...often times 30% or 40% of the calories are from protein. Whole grains will give you a lot of good protein too, along w/ the more obvious beans, nuts, seeds etc, the list goes on.<br><br>
2)probably will go down some as your body adjusts, you are eating a lot more fiber than you were before though which could cause more gas. plenty of things you could get at a pharmacy, like Beano or w/e.<br><br>
3)nope, eat a balanced healthy diet and B12 supplement. Like penny mentioned, vit D if you don't get enough sun, especially in winter, but since I read your other thread I know you're a firefighter in florida so I don't think you have to worry.<br><br>
4) I like vegguide.org also, it's user reviews on restaurants, and ppl leave notes about whether or not vegan food was available and in what capacity. If there's any co-ops near you they usually have some better variety of vegan friendly foods.<br><br>
5) just be straight up w/ her. If you're in this for the long-haul then tell her that. can't tell you what her reaction will be, but a lot of people on this forum have significant others that eat meat and it works out fine...as long as you can respect each others differences.
 

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I use a hemp protein powder that's cheap and vegan friendly, and my muscles are more cut than they've ever been! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
As for the gas issues, expect to spend at least a good 4-6 weeks with your bowels detoxing from all of the nasty things which animal products leave in there. But then trust me, you will feel so much better for it!
 

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1) <a href="http://www.veganbodybuilding.com" target="_blank">www.veganbodybuilding.com</a><br><br>
2) Do you have any bowel problems? I've never heard of this before<br><br>
3) No, and it's very debatable whether b12 is needed. We only know a fraction of all there is to know about b12. Vegan sources include semen and vaginal lubrication... it's the biological reason for oral <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"><br><br>
4) Already answered<br><br>
5) Eww I don't know I would never go out with a non-vegan - they taste really bad. Tell her that lol.
 

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I developed this list of protein requirements for active people for a sports nutrition article I wrote recently. It's based on well-founded research and sports nutrition principles. (The pound conversions are rounded off for convenience. Use 2.2 for accurate conversion.)<br><br>
- Sedentary men and women -- 0.8-1.0 gm/kg/bw (0.4-0.5 gm/pound/bw)<br>
- Elite male endurance athlete -- 1.6-2.0 gm/kg/bw (0.8-1.0 gm/pound/bw)<br>
- Competitive endurance athlete -- 1.2-1.6 gm/kg/bw (0.6-0.8 gm/pound/bw)<br>
- Recreational endurance athlete -- 1.0-1.2 gm/kg/bw (0.5-0.6 gm/pound/bw)<br>
- Football and power sports -- 1.4-1.7 gm/kg/bw (0.7-0.9 gm/pound/bw)<br>
- Resistance athlete early training -- 1.5-1.7 gm/kg/bw (0.8-0.9 gm/pound/bw)<br>
- Resistance athlete steady state -- 1.0-1.2 gm/kg/bw (0.5-0.6 gm/pound/bw)<br>
- Women 15% lower than men<br><br>
One point to note is that elite or hard-training endurance athletes like marathoners and triathletes do need extra protein because the catabolism of endurance training breaks down muscle tissue and extra protein is required for repair, compared to a sedentary person. On the other hand, resistance trainers (bodybuilders, lifters etc) really don't require that level of extra protein. The muscle mags push the extra protein idea because their income base often relies on protein supplement advertising.<br><br>
However, because endurance trainers are likely to be taking in up to 30% or more energy to fuel their training and racing, the extra protein thing more or less attends to itself if a little care is taken with food choices. As others have pointed out, extra food means extra protein. Six-time Hawaii ironman champion triathlete Dave Scott was apparently vegan for all six of his titles.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>FirePheonix</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2926584"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Hello all, I am writing another post so that I might be able to get some answers for a few things I have noticed, since starting last week. Any help would be amazing.<br><br>
1) BIGGEST question: Protein.....A lot of body-building/fitness mags will say that for maximum growth, one should take in about a gram of protein per day, per pound of body weight. For me, that is 187 grams of protein a day. Contrast this to a few vegan books I have read that say that most people take in too much protein, and 30-40 grams is sufficient. Which one is correct? Should I supplement my vegan diet with protein shakes to add protein if I want to look well-built? Keep in mind that I am training for a triathlon currently. I just don't want to lose muscle. Losing the fat is part of the point!<br><br>
2) Gas. When does this go away? DOES this go away? I am going to be STARTING fires pretty soon I think.<br><br>
3) Supplementation: Anything other than B12 needed?<br><br>
4) Are there sites for good veg restaurants? My old sites don't even have a spot for it.<br><br>
5) How much is my girlfriend going to flip out when I really explain all of this? For now, it is just a "new training diet".... I had to make her steak last night (I am the cook, nearly always), while I had an incredible eggplant lasagna. I realize this is an unknowable question, but how did others' family/friends respond?<br><br>
6) And just for a fun story....had my first, "Wait, YOU'RE a vegan?!" moment last night. Was talking to a woman and a few of her friends at a fundraiser, and they brought up the fact that there was meatless baked ziti at the function. (It was, "I can't imagine firemen are usually vegetarians.") To which I responded, "well, myself and that guy over there are."<br><br>
I think the idea of what is supposed to be a hyper-masculine professional being a vegan did not occur to them....not to mention we are both tall, tattooed, shaved-heads, etc....it was all rather entertaining. Gotta represent, haha <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"></div>
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I'm only speaking from experience here...<br><br>
1. Echoing what some others have said, your protein intake is going to depend on your activity level. The guideline of 1g/lb of body weight seems like an awful lot... since you're training for a triathlon and not competitive body building (which is borderline unhealthy in my opinion) you probably don't need that much. You can track your nutrition intake for a few weeks to see if you are getting enough protein, but I think you'll be shocked at how easy it is to get. If you're feeling really concerned, it doesn't hurt to add some protein powder to your diet as you're adjusting. Also, look into naturally protein-rich foods, like quinoa and oatmeal.<br><br>
2. I also struggled with gas something AWFUL when I went vegan. Your body is just getting used to having more fiber. It <i>should</i> get better over time, but there may be some foods that upset your stomach. For instance, when I eat a lot of steamed vegetables, I get really bad gas. Seitan and excess soy can do that to me too. Try looking up a good herbal tea to calm the stomach (I like peppermint, personally).<br><br>
3. One thing some vegans forget about is zinc. I actually had a zinc deficiency problem at about my 1 year mark. I now take a cal/mag/zinc supplement in the morning and a b-12 sublingual in the evening. You also may need to look into vitamin D supplementation depending on where you live. You're probably alright though if you spend time outside.<br><br>
4. Like someone mentioned before, Happycow is a good one. Also, certain cuisines may traditionally have some veg*n options available. Mediterranean, Mexican, Indian, Chinese, and Thai are some good bets. If in doubt, call the restaurant.<br><br>
5. When I told my husband, he was super supportive, but this isn't always the case. She may freak at first, but the key is educating her. We girls tend to worry about our men, so make sure she understands that you won't drop dead in a few days. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"><br><br>
6. Love it! It always makes me happy to see people breaking the vegan stereotypes! You keep on representin'.
 
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