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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found a few threads regarding making soy milk, most of which involved using a soy milk machine, but I am going to start with the more involved method, since it's money I don't have right now and I'd like to experience the process.<br><br>
While I have found numerous recipes for making soy milk, tofu and how to use okara, I haven't found a good explanation as to different methods of making soy milk. What I am getting at is in what order it is best to cook vs. strain. Most recipes suggest the following:<br><br>
1) Soak soybeans AT LEAST overnight.<br>
2) Add 1 part soaked soybeans to anywhere from 1 to 3 1/2 parts water, depending on desired milk thickness in a blender.<br>
3) Blend for 2 minutes, depending on blender.<br><br>
Here's where the variations occur<br><br>
4) Strain blended mixter through cheesecloth about 2-3 times. Bring to boil at medium heat and cook for 15-20 minutes watching the pot carefully so it doesn't boil over.<br><br>
OR<br><br>
4) Some suggest instead to add the mixture to water, cook it, remove excess foam (yuba - actually I don't think it's yuba, I was confused) as necessary and THEN strain it.<br><br><br>
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Is there a reason for using one method over the other, because the first one seems to make more sense from the perspective of not having to worry about burning one's self. Ive seen some sugguestions made that by adding hot water to the blender in the beginning reduces the beany flavor, but I might want to see what it tastes like the first time, not to mention, I don't have a ridiculously expensive blender and heating it up that much is probably a bad move. In all likelihood, I'll probably try both methods anyway to see the differences for myself, but I thought I'd ask anyway.<br><br>
I guess I'll start there.<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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I ground the soaked beans with a kitchenaid grinder. Look in thrift stores for the grinders that just clamp to a table- I've seen them looking pretty new, at a cheap price.<br>
I simmered the ground beans and about 4 parts water for about 2 hours ( I think..it's been a while)<br>
I didn't know the foam was yuba, I don't remember if I strained it off or not...<br>
I let it cook down. I put a wire mesh colander lined with single layer of cheesecloth over another pot, and scooped the soybeans with a slotted spoon into it, then squished the milk out, and dumped the "okara" in another container. I did this until I could just pour the rest into the colander.<br>
I did not blend the hot mixture.<br>
I poured the milk into glass bottles I reused, and added agave and vanilla to one. I really liked the taste, didn't find it any more "beany" than store bought.<br>
Okara is fablulous! I made okara old bay cakes. Just google okara crab cakes, it's the only recipe for that.<br>
It wasn't very hard, just really a stay home thing. I don't know how well a blender would work though, if you can get hold of a grinder, or maybe food processor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for all the information, but my main misunderstanding was whether to strain the beans before or after cooking them. Since both methods seem to be an option, I'll probably try straining them first and see how that turns out. Doing it that way seems to prevent it from boling over as easily. After that I'm sure I'll try it the other way just to see how it turns out.
 
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