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Hi, so I'm 10 days in and I'll technically consider myself a pescatarian, meaning I don't usually even eat fish but I haven't made the conscious decision to relinquish it. Anyway I'm gassy all the time after eating now, even when I don't have beans in my meals. Any tips? I read something on a forum about this being a problem for new veggies but I forgot what the solution was.
 

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If you are eating more fruits and vegetables, the increased fiber might be causing the gas. Some veggies are worse than others for gas, such as broccoli or cruciferous vegetables. Lightly cooking/steaming them might help. Getting your fruits/veggies through smoothies (allowing the blender to break them down first for you) might also help your body get more used to them. As for beans, if you are using canned, make sure to rinse your beans first before using to get rid of the excess sodium. If using dried, make sure to soak them at least 24 hours (lentils do not require soaking though) and then cook them in water for at least an hour to two hours. Adding stuff like baking soda or kombu when cooking beans helps pull out certain sugars in them and make them more digestible.

It does take a while for the body to adjust to a higher fiber diet. I can eat up to four cups of beans a day (not that I do that all the time) and ten or more servings of veggies with no problem at all. Years ago when I first started increasing beans and veggies and whole grains I did have a lot of gas. I introduced them slowly over time and eventually my body got used to them. My omnivore husband used to struggle with it too but he is getting much more used to my food now too.

Also, be sure to drink lots of water and move often. It helps.
 

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Initially avoid vegetables that notorious for causing gas such as broccoli, cauliflower, brussells sprouts and kale. Stick to the ones easier on the gut such as carrot, squash, courgette, baby spinach and mushrooms. You may also want to avoid raw and lightly cooked food if the gas is really bad. Just stick to cooked veg. Once the gas doesn't so bad, gradually re-introduce well cooked versions of 'gassy' veg and see how you get on. Usually you just need time.

You could also eat white pasta and rice for a bit, instead of wholegrain. They're not as good for you but sometimes they are the only way to avoid excessive gas until your system adjusts. I can eat refined pasta no problem but wholegrain makes my stomach hurt.

Always soak beans well and rinse canned beans. Never use the liquid that canned beans are in.
 

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My problem with gas was due to eating certain foods as the wrong times. For instance, a common mistake is to eat a fruit dessert after a carb dinner. Do not eat starchy carbohydrates like potatoes, rice etc. and then eat fruits or vegetables. Veggies take much shorter to digest than carbs and so it means gases from the veggies can form behind the digestion of the carbs and start to smell, hence causing awful, awful farts haha! Try to have all your fruits in the morning, veggies throughout the day until dinner and, if you're not on a raw vegan diet, your carbs in the evening. Hope this helps!
 

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The Corpulent Vegan
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I noticed that the more whole foods I ate (beans, lentils, raw veggies, greens) the less gas I ended up having in the long run. I've been full veg since March but I've been eating mostly veg for the last 5 years, and the more of these foods I ate (and the more frequently I ate them) the less I noticed the gas being a problem as time wore on. It's honestly all about getting your gut flora used to the idea of whole foods. They won't react so violently if you keep at it.
 

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Great information and tips! I want to add to always chew your food thoroughly, and avoid carbonated drinks and drinking from straws.
 
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