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  Topic Review (Newest First)
05-11-2005 12:54 AM
brownieB26 Vegan, and never going back as long as I'm in charge of what I put in my mouth.
05-10-2005 11:13 PM
stellar26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfie View Post

I don't much care what others do or don't eat but misinformation like this really bugs me. JMO.



It's refreshing to see nutrition classes haven't changed much since I was in school many years ago.



is meant for so-called nutrition classes in school, not stellar.





They only preach it because it's true, sadly.

The books are actually quite veggie-friendly; one of them has an entire chapter devoted to vegan nutrition, and speaks highly of it (assuming that the practicing vegan knows enough about nutrition to supplement where appropriate [b12] and to balance their meals accordingly).
05-09-2005 03:33 PM
Tom I'm stuck in "near-vegan". I've hugely cut back on dairy and egg, but I really don't call myself "vegan" in deference to those who really toe the line. I didn't vote in the poll, but the 4th option (Yes, I have and am currently lacto ovo but plan on going vegan again) is closest.



Mostly I trip up on baked goods that have non-vegan ingredients, but not always. Last week, a co-worker brought some corn chowder to work (it had milk in it) and it smelled good. I would have had some but for the bacon in it. Still, when I go to a local restaurant for lunch and order a vegetarian burrito (beans, cheese, sour cream, rice, onion, jalapenos, hot sauce, and tomatoes on a flour tortilla), I ask them to leave out the cheese and sour cream (the beans themselves are OK).
05-09-2005 05:28 AM
Azalea I'm a lax strict vegetarian. Or something like that. And that's probably what I'll keep on being.
05-09-2005 01:31 AM
AccidentalVeg Wow. Apparently I am a "Veganarian". That has to be the lamest thing I have ever heard.



I just say "vegetarian" now and prepare myself for the fish question by concentrating my Ki into a question-repelling force-field.



d
05-09-2005 12:44 AM
Formerbaboon I just switched back to l/o. I plan on eating meat again soon. Just kidding. I just don't see myself being a vegan again.
05-06-2005 04:27 PM
GhostUser i'm working on being as vegan as possible (dietary and otherwise) and i don't want to ever look back. ever.
05-06-2005 04:19 PM
GhostUser
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirkjobsluder View Post

Well, I don't know about the category issue. If I say I'm an l-o vegetarian, then it is assumed that I want big slabs of cheese, milk and dairy on everything I eat. On the other hand, if I say I'm a vegan, then it's assumed that I'm always circumspect about trace ingredients, and dairy in baked goods.



The end result is that I'll label myself in different ways depending on context.



Who's assuming either of those things? To me, you either eat dairy/eggs or you don't, regardless of quantities. I'm not asking anyone to label themselves and I don't want this to turn into a debate on the semantics of the poll. I just wanted to get an overall view of everything, so please don't make this into more than it is.
05-06-2005 03:55 PM
kirkjobsluder Well, I don't know about the category issue. If I say I'm an l-o vegetarian, then it is assumed that I want big slabs of cheese, milk and dairy on everything I eat. On the other hand, if I say I'm a vegan, then it's assumed that I'm always circumspect about trace ingredients, and dairy in baked goods.



The end result is that I'll label myself in different ways depending on context.
05-06-2005 03:53 PM
blueskies I don't really fit in any of the categories. I've been lacto-ovo for a few years now, and recently I've decided to cut dairy from my diet. I still eat certain things that contain traces of dairy, because I've bought them already, but don't plan on buying them again once they're gone. However, I don't plan on removing eggs from my diet right now. I don't eat eggs on their own, but I do eat things that were prepared with some eggs, such as muffins. I found that it's much easier to find dairy-free baked goods than vegan ones. When presented with both I will choose the vegan option, though. As for honey.. I must admit I never really cared about that.
05-06-2005 03:25 PM
WonderRandy I have attempted veganism several times, but it never stuck. I'm your classic "I would be vegan but I'm addicted to cheese" type of vegetarian. my L/O consumption is pretty minor really, and cheese is my only real issue. I wouldn't even mind the non-dairy cheeses if they weren't so flippin' expensive...



one day...
05-06-2005 03:08 PM
zoebird i was vegan for 5 years or so. It was easy being vegan and i was happy that way. i had no trouble transitioning or being vegan.



when i started to get some weird 'health' problems, we noticed that my cholesterol was too low. it was already low before i was vegan, so perhaps dietary cholesterol was helping me maintain low-normal levels. Therefore, i went back to eggs and raw (unpasturized) dairy.



i think about being vegan every day; i have to remind myself to consume my eggs and my dairy. It's not my preference. I was actually 'on my way' toward an 80-20 raw vegan diet. it was so easy and so much fun! i just love whole foods. But, i have to consume the eggs/dairy, so i do. I can't imagine that i'll be able to go back to being vegan, so i answered that i don't plan on going back.
05-06-2005 02:17 PM
GhostUser
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirkjobsluder View Post

I dislike all of the categories presented here.



Like I said, I tried to include everything I could think of, but I realize that they won't fit everyone.
05-06-2005 11:07 AM
pseudo_vegan
Quote:
Originally Posted by colorful View Post

I'm not ready or willing to give up on vegetarianism completely, and I think lacto-ovo vegetarianism is a good compromise of my ethics and nutrition, at this point in my life.



Fair enough



Cheers!
05-06-2005 10:57 AM
Virtue23 I voted "No, I have never tried veganism but am planning on trying it."



Thats the first time I think I admitted this too - wow. Going vegan right now would be very unwise tho, since my sister is still recovering from ED-like tendencies and I KNOW that would trigger her. Also, my family is still adapting to me just being a veg*n. Soooo, after more research and maybe once I get my own place, I think I'd try it for sure. I'd do it for semi-ethical reasons since I do like the idea that it shows that you stand for something. And I think its worth going the extra mile.
05-06-2005 09:35 AM
colorful
Quote:
Originally Posted by pseudo_vegan View Post

What about Asian countries who have had little to no dairy for hundreds of centuries...and they're still outliving Western societies with "natural food source[s]" of B12 (among other things), with [generally] better overall health?



And now, that dairy and more "western"-type food is being introduced into their diets (at least the younger generations), they're beginning to see the same sort of health concerns [Americans] are...?



(Just a thought...don't want to start an arguement or hijack the thread...)



Cheers.



Generally, these Asian countries are not vegan. It's true that they consume little or no dairy, but they do consume eggs and meat in small amounts, with large amounts of vegetables. Therefore, they get their natural B-12 (as well as protein, iron, and zinc) in eggs and meat, and of course achieve an abundance of health-promoting factors from their large vegetable intake. From a nutritional standpoint, I think their diet is very sound, and perhaps healthier than a lacto-ovo vegetarian diet.



I'm not ready or willing to give up on vegetarianism completely, and I think lacto-ovo vegetarianism is a good compromise of my ethics and nutrition, at this point in my life.
05-06-2005 08:56 AM
pseudo_vegan
Quote:
Originally Posted by colorful View Post

I was vegan for one year in 1998-99, then again for about 6 months last year. I went back to lacto-ovo and have no intention of going vegan again. I firmly believe that a natural food source of vitamin B-12 is the healthiest choice for me and my family.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stellar26 View Post

I feel the same way.

I'm on my way toward a degree in nutrition right now, and if there's one thing that my books have stressed it's that supplementation should only be a last resort as they're not as readily absorbable. On top of the B12 problem, there are an array of other B vitamins, iron, and calcium that my diet didn't have enough of. For me, at this time in my life, veganism is not okay. I'd rather eat the occasional egg and hunk of cheese and feel better knowing that I'm not going to suffer from osteoporosis 50 years down the road, anemia, or another deficiency- related disorder.



What about Asian countries who have had little to no dairy for hundreds of centuries...and they're still outliving Western societies with "natural food source[s]" of B12 (among other things), with [generally] better overall health?



And now, that dairy and more "western"-type food is being introduced into their diets (at least the younger generations), they're beginning to see the same sort of health concerns [Americans] are...?



(Just a thought...don't want to start an arguement or hijack the thread...)



Cheers.
05-06-2005 08:52 AM
pseudo_vegan Third time's a charm for me



I tried for about two weeks in high school, but 'twixt working and school and extra-curricular activities, cooking and taking care of myself was too time and financially-consuming...



Then I tried again last summer, but I spent a month out in Berkely, CA and surprisingly enough being vegan was nearly impossible...I didn't have a kitchenette in my hotel room (not even a mini fridge!), and I spent sooo much money trying to be vegan, yet I was still becoming mal-nurished...



But alas, vegan since January 01 2005...going strong



Cheers!
05-06-2005 08:48 AM
Wolfie
Quote:
Originally Posted by stellar26 View Post

I feel the same way.

I'm on my way toward a degree in nutrition right now, and if there's one thing that my books have stressed it's that supplementation should only be a last resort as they're not as readily absorbable. On top of the B12 problem, there are an array of other B vitamins, iron, and calcium that my diet didn't have enough of. For me, at this time in my life, veganism is not okay. I'd rather eat the occasional egg and hunk of cheese and feel better knowing that I'm not going to suffer from osteoporosis 50 years down the road, anemia, or another deficiency- related disorder.



I don't much care what others do or don't eat but misinformation like this really bugs me. JMO.



It's refreshing to see nutrition classes haven't changed much since I was in school many years ago.



is meant for so-called nutrition classes in school, not stellar.
05-06-2005 04:58 AM
Qwerks I picked the "never went back" option, but feel a bit fraudish because I fell partially off the wagon for a month during that first year, consuming prepared foods with dairy and eggs in them.



I might like to adopt that "veganarian" lable. It sounds like a "vegan" who will make the occasional small compromise towards L/O vegetarianism if s/he feels that it's called for.
05-06-2005 04:39 AM
Lelena I became vegan 8 years ago after being lacto/ovo for 8 years and have never wavered. I had no difficulty.
05-06-2005 01:54 AM
Brandon
Quote:
Originally Posted by shagginabit View Post

nah. Went vegan, never looked back.



I went L/O back in 1989 and was faithful to it up until this past 21st of February, when I went Vegan. I have had no problems being Vegan since then, and I'm coming up on 3 months. I've never missed cow cheese, the Morningstar Farms products I once ate (wings, chik'n nuggets, corn dogs) nor anything else. I feel better than I ever have. I have had opportunities to eat cheese again, and passed because quite frankly it didn't appeal to me.

A very good friend of mine is thinking about going vegan, but she's basically a very strict L/O, who only consumes animal products in trace ingredients, such as egg-whites in Veggie burgers, and the like. I have nothing negative to say to her, as she's been a very committed L/O for over 5 years now. She's a vegetarian, and I consider her my best friend. She eats and loves my vegan cooking, and we have no issues between us as to our food.

I don't see why any L/O would have a problem eating a vegan dish. I also don't see why a vegan would have a problem with a vegetarian eating what they choose.

It's all about responsible choices to me.

I seriously doubt I'll ever go L/O again. If that day comes, I will deal with it accordingly. Incidentally, I'm the only veg*n in my family, and my family has always been supportive for the most part. They ask all the normal questions that omnis ask veg*ns. The "where do you get your protein, calcium, etc." questions. VB has presented me with a surplus of info as to where a vegan can find such dietary elements.

I voted vegan and never going back, much like what Shag said. Hence why I quoted her. She's always been inspiring to me, and I've told her as much.

If the day comes where I feel veganism isn't cutting it for me, I will consider being lacto-ovo again. I doubt that will happen, but I've learned never to say never.
05-06-2005 01:31 AM
Elena99
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirkjobsluder View Post

I dislike all of the categories presented here.



Can you think of any that match your situation to offer?
05-06-2005 12:25 AM
kirkjobsluder I dislike all of the categories presented here.
05-06-2005 12:23 AM
kpickell "Yes, I am currently lacto ovo and don't plan on trying veganism again."



That's not to say I won't attempt to reduce my dairy intake, just that veganism doesn't always make sense to me.
05-05-2005 11:59 PM
BrokenAngel I became vegan March 12th of this year and haven't looked back!
05-05-2005 11:02 PM
GhostUser nah. Went vegan, never looked back.
05-05-2005 10:54 PM
synergy I was vegan for about 6 months, and I still eat really minimal amounts of animal products, but on monday night, I had some feta cheese. And I liked it.

I still plan on eating as vegan as possible, but don't worry, I won't call myself vegan anymore. Maybe one day.
05-05-2005 10:18 PM
hazardbliss I was raised vegetarian, but I went vegan nearly ten years ago and have never looked back. Even if it were proven that the vegan diet was nutritionally inadequate, I'd still be vegan, because the overwhelming guilt of taking part in the exploitation of so many creatures would kill me anyway. But that's just me.
05-05-2005 09:32 PM
instg8r
Quote:
Originally Posted by instg8r View Post

thanks for clearing up the l/o veg! veganarian wasnt a typo - i must have seen it on the peta boards - i did a search for it here (after reading your reply) and somebody used the term when talking about using wool....eh i will figure it out! just wanted to say thanks!



ok i found it - just had to search peta2 boards ---- anyway this is what i was referring to ----------



Type 1) Semi-vegetarians - These 'vegetarians' eat all types of foods in their diet - including meat. However these individuals limit the amount of animal products they consume. They do eat animals though, which is why they should just be called omnivores instead of vegetarians.



Type 2) Pesco-omnivore - They don't eat any meat EXCEPT for fish. They do eat seafood.



Type 3) Pollo-omnivore - They don't eat any meat EXCEPT for poultry (chicken, turkey, duck, etc.).



Type 4) Lacto vegetarians - They don't eat meat, but do consume milk, butter, and cheese. (dairy)



Type 5) Lacto-ovo vegetarians - They don't eat meat, but do consume milk, butter, eggs and cheese. (dairy)



Type 6) Veganarians - I laughed out loud when I heard this one, but then I realized that I WAS one (back when I heard about this). Veganarians are Lacto-ovo vegetarians, but they limit the amount of dairy and eggs that they eat. They also avoid buying products that were tested on animals, and they don't wear clothing or jewelry that is made from animals.



Type 7) Vegans - These are the only real vegetarians, because they only eat veggies (and legumes, etc.). They avoid all animal products in their diet, such as meat, dairy products, even certain non-essential vitamins that only come from animals. They also avoid things that were tested on animals, and clothing/jewelry that is made from animals. The cruelty-free way to be! Like me!



Type 8) Fruitarians - Fruitarians exclude all foods of animal origin as well as cereals (grains). Diet mainly comprises raw and dried fruits, nuts, olive oil, occasionally legumes. <-- copied that from a website. I'm not sure exactly what they eat, that's just what the page said. Sounds crazy to me. (no offense any fruitarians out there!)



Type 9) Freegans - These people will eat meat as long as they didn't pay for it or support the trade/industry. For example, if McDonalds was giving away free burgers, they would turn them down, because McDonalds would probably count that as 1 person who loves their burgers for their survey or whatever. But if they were over someone's house and there happened to be a burger that someone already got from McDonalds, they would eat it, because they weren't really supporting or helping McDonalds. They just say that they were making sure that that cow's life didn't go to waste. Same thing with trash cans; for example, Mickey Ds tosses their breakfast sandwiches when lunch time kicks in, so perfectly good sandwiches are just thrown out. So a freegan would go out back and dig them out and eat them. And the same thing goes for clothing; if they came across some leather shoes in a trash can, or if someone gave them one of their old pairs, they would wear them. They just wouldn't buy them from the actual manufactuer or distributor.
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