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  Topic Review (Newest First)
05-27-2017 03:32 AM
reikistar Lentils, beans (all kinds), chickpeas, nuts, seeds, millet, quinoa, gluten free oats are my main sources. But there's protein in everything including vegetables and other grains, so what you really need is to know what constitutes a good balanced vegeatarian diet and make sure you're eating enough in the way of calories. I failed first time around because I didn't eat enough but thats because I have a poor appetite anyway (or used to, before I discovered how delicious vegetarian food is!).

It would be wise do some research and learn how to eat well as a healthy vegetarian. If you rely on protein shakes (which you don't need if you're eating well and properly) you might struggle to stay motivated as a vegetarian.
11-04-2016 10:59 PM
Sidhuriel I find it pretty easy to reach protein goals, but I guess it makes a difference if you have a strong appetite or not.

I get my protein from plant sources, like legumes, soy and nuts. I work with a nutritionist because I have Crohns disease, yet thanks to her advice I have never had a protein deficiency. She always says it's better for me to eat a little more fat than is recommended than to be protein deficient, so I eat a lot of nuts. My favourites are macadamia's, almonds and brazil nuts.


Aside from that I do eat organic cheese, preferably cottage cheese because it has a lot of protein and can be used in lots of dishes because it has a pretty neutral flavour.

If all else fails you can always rely at least partially on vegetarian products that have been factory enhanced. But I think you should be ok, it's easier to get protein than you think
11-03-2016 01:00 PM
Symondezyn
Quote:
Originally Posted by silva View Post
@Espirito--
The values you give that example are horribly off!
I don't have time to correct values, so if anyone else sees this, please do!
I'd say close to 1200 calories, and not near the protein attributed.

ex: lentils are about 115 calores per 100grams, with about 8 protein
Could it be that the measurements were for the dry, pre-cooked amounts of pasta and lentils? 250g dry (green) lentils would be about 820 calories, 61.5g protein.

ETA: although admittedly, that would be a LOT of lentils to eat in one serving LOL
11-03-2016 08:46 AM
silva @Espirito--
The values you give that example are horribly off!
I don't have time to correct values, so if anyone else sees this, please do!
I'd say close to 1200 calories, and not near the protein attributed.

ex: lentils are about 115 calores per 100grams, with about 8 protein
11-02-2016 03:03 PM
Espirito It's easy to reach protein requeriments.

Today i ate..

Breakfast

. 250 g of oats
. 1 Banana
. 250 ml soy milk
. 1 Teaspoon of black pepper

Lunch

. 250 g of lentils
. Pinch of salt
. 1 Teaspoon of Red pepper

Pré Workout

. 6 Dates

Dinner

. 2 Cups ( 500 g ) of pasta
. Pinch of salt
. 1 Teaspoon of Red pepper

MACROS

Cals: 3917

Carbs: 729,91 g
Protein: 165,96 g
Fat: 34,70

Carbs: 75 %
Protein: 17 %
Fat: 8%
10-29-2016 11:04 AM
Werewolf Girl I haven't eaten meat for over half my life and I've never had to actively try to get protein, as long as you're not living on only junk food it shouldn't be an issue. This is a great article on vegan protein sources: http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/protein.php
10-29-2016 11:00 AM
ModVegan I'd recommend reading Proteinaholic by Dr. Garth Davis first, just to understand how much protein people really need. It's an interesting book and will definitely help with any concerns you might be having about following a vegan/vegetarian diet.

I get more than enough of the protein recommended by the WHO and USDA by eating a starch based diet. As long as you aren't under eating, or eating a diet based on junk food, a plant-based diet has more than enough protein.
10-29-2016 09:20 AM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruno from Brazil View Post
Hey there mates!

The problem is: most people have NO IDEA about those foods. For instance, did you know that LUPINI BEANS have 36g of protein per 100g? That's MORE THAN MEAT. Kinda baffling, isn't it???

Amazing! I had never heard of lupini beans before.

I found some additional information on lupini beans. Lupini beans are high in protein, but the "36g of protein per 100g" figure is before cooking: https://www.google.com/#q=protein+in+100g+lupin+beans . During cooking, the beans absorb quite a bit of water weight, and so their protein content becomes 16g per 100g. This is still quite good; about the same as soybeans: https://www.google.com/#q=protein+in+100g+soybeans

.
10-28-2016 01:48 AM
Bruno from Brazil Hey there mates!

Look, protein is actually an abundant macro nutrient in nature. You can find it in grains, seeds, legumes, and even some leafs and vegetables. But while most foods contain a little bit of protein, there are some *special* ones that just pack HEAPS of proteins per serving.

The problem is: most people have NO IDEA about those foods. For instance, did you know that LUPINI BEANS have 36g of protein per 100g? That's MORE THAN MEAT. Kinda baffling, isn't it???

I seriously recommend you check out this link - it's a table with vegan sources of protein. Most foods there have more than 15g of protein per 100g (which is very good) - many have more than 20g (which is excellent), and a few have more than 30G OF PROTEIN PER 100G! That's just insane.

When you have the right information, it gets pretty easy to reach an optimal daily intake of protein on a vegan diet. And you don't even need vegan protein powders - although I love them


Hope it helps! cheers
06-08-2015 09:39 AM
Zidane I have been a vegetarian for more than 20 years. I got my protein source from Seitan, Tofu, Beans and Green Peas(My favoruite!). I compiled a list of 10 protein source for vegans. Hope this helps

Sometimes when I work out, I take vegetarian protein shakes. I also drink soya milk regularly on every weekend morning. Try to consume protein in the morning as it takes time for your organs to break them down, you won't want to overwork your organs while sleeping...
02-10-2015 08:29 PM
akahyperfriend I get it mostly from a mix of various beans, eggs, dairy, and soy products. Sometimes I'll have peanut butter or nuts but that's not too often since I'm not a big fan.
01-22-2015 02:47 PM
brookgirl I usually have a bowl of oatmeal with nuts or nut butter, fruit, cinnamon, an almond milk. If I don't want to wake up in time to actually make oatmeal (which is almost every day) I soak all everything in the almond milk overnight and blend it into a smoothie in the morning. I've never really considered it to be a protein shake since it doesn't come powdered in a plastic jug and it actually tastes good. However, depending on the nuts/nut butters I put into it, it has about 25%-30% of the protein I need in a day. It also has about a third of the fat I need in a day, which for me is the much tougher need to meet on a vegan diet.

Lunch and dinner are a bit more varied. Mostly it's a mix of veggies and grains or legumes. Both are rich in protein. On days that I've bothered tracking everything, I tend to get 60-65 g of protein, which is far more than I need. Before you try taking supplements or powders for anything, track what you're already eating to see if you actually need to.
01-22-2015 10:07 AM
rasitha.wijesekera lentils, soya and some other vegetables I don't know the English name of. I take a soya supplement as well.
01-16-2015 02:15 PM
Go Vegan
Quote:
Originally Posted by MozIsMyShepherd View Post
I would go as far as protein shakes unless you exercise a lot and you have a very limited diet. Saying that I don't have anything against protein shakes I just think they are not necessary if you eat well. Most vegetables have a lot of protein in them, even fruit is 5% protein and beans and lentils are 25% protein. Hope this helps...
Yes it is definitely true that a veggie/ vegan can get enough protein from their diet

I agree that protein shakes can be useful for some people if used in conjunction with exercise...
01-16-2015 02:09 PM
MozIsMyShepherd I wouldn't go as far as protein shakes unless you exercise a lot and you have a very limited diet. Saying that I don't have anything against protein shakes I just think they are not necessary if you eat well. Most vegetables have a lot of protein in them, even fruit is 5% protein and beans and lentils are 25% protein. Hope this helps...
01-16-2015 01:29 PM
Go Vegan Hi there!

Yes I use vegan protein shakes and they are fine

I also get protein from soya mince, tofu, lentils, vegan cheese and soya/ rice milk
01-16-2015 01:21 PM
ron4540 Tempeh, which is a mix of soybeans, brown rice, barley and millet (40 grams of protein in 1 block--easy to prep and eat in one sitting--cut up and put in toaster oven for 15 minutes at 425 F)

Silken Tofu -- (16 grams--blend with frozen blueberries to make a pudding)

Fully cooked edamame in shells (@Trader Joe's--over 30 grams protein in a 1-pound package, makes a simple lunch to take to work, okay to eat cold or run under hot water to defrost)

Shelled edamame (boil/steam for a few minutes)

Frozen green peas (can eat raw--defrosted under hot water--or just boil/steam for a few minutes)

Frozen lima beans (must boil/steam for a few minutes--beans should not be eaten raw)

I sometimes buy garbanzo beans (also called chick peas), but try not to buy food in cans anymore.

I sometimes buy lentils, but I prefer buying edamame, peas, or lima beans, which come as nice "green" food and are quick to prepare. Lentils take about 20 minutes to cook.

Grains like rice, quinoa, and wheat really don't have that much protein per calorie.

Also, nuts/seeds are lacking in protein compared to all the calories and fat.

Of course, it's great to eat things like broccoli, but you can't really meet all of your protein needs through vegetables.

Also, I'd like to say that I avoid things like protein powders, because they're expensive and "processed," and I like to get my protein from real foods, which offer lots of other benefits in addition to the protein they contain.
01-14-2015 05:37 PM
parkash
Quote:
Originally Posted by romivp View Post
Hi, I'm actively planning on going vegan or vegetarian.
Where do you get your everyday protein? I've read something about "protein shakes" has anybody tried them already? Help!
Hi, I am glad you are educating yourself before making the decision. There are some great points in the replies above. I would like to add this: What's interesting and important to note, is that only the proteins from soy and quinoa are classified as complete proteins because they contain all essential amino acids, much like the proteins from animal-based foods. So it's not a bad idea to include some of that into your future diet. Quinoa for example can be used in many great tasting salads like Quinoa Basmati Rice Pilaf I love making for my family. Here is the recipe..

I just had a discussion with someone of Facebook who claimed that "we were meant to eat meat". Apparently he knows someone who lost his teeth after years of being a vegetarian... These are the kind of stories that make me chuckle. Since I stopped eating meat, I eat a much better balanced diet than in the past, because I want to make sure I get all I need. What about all of the meat eaters who don't eat vegetables. They get the protein but with that they also get the bad fats and no vitamins.

Good luck in your new lifestyle when ever you choose to start living it
01-14-2015 01:45 PM
Tangerine Sky Although I am eating vegetarianism diet as opposed to vegan, I did read the book 80-10-10 (Graham) and he stated in his book that we obtain lots of protein in our veges and fruits, then also using nuts/seeds to augment daily protein. Having said that, I think that I ate Waaayyyy over the requirements for protein before becoming vegetarian. This is my 8th day on vegetarian diet and I actually feel much better eating less protein and eating more veges and some fruits than previously.
12-08-2014 06:56 PM
Tiger Lilly
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfie View Post
It's easy to get enough protein on a vegan diet. But we do have to pay more attention than your average omni to getting enough of all the amino acids, especially lysine. That's all I'm saying. So many people post that they feel weak, faint, etc. after turning vegan and wonder about protein among other things and 99% of the time other vegans tell them they never have to worry about protein. Well, we don't exactly have to worry about it but we do have to pay more attention to it.

Good site all around for all things vegan. Here are her views on protein.

http://www.theveganrd.com/2014/02/pl...eed-beans.html
Oh, you're completely right!

And I LOVE Ginny Messina. I bought "Vegan For Her" and it's great! An easy read and packed with info.
12-07-2014 06:39 PM
Wolfie
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Lilly View Post
Protein is one of the big myths about vegetarians and vegans, I guess that's the biggest sore point about the whole thing. We were told we 'couldn't' get enough protein, it's one of the lies we were told along with 'humane slaughter' and 'free range'.

I still get frustrated with people who tell me I "don't have to worry" about Iron. I do worry about it. I have a condition that requires me to worry about it.

At the same time, as long as someone is eating a varied vego diet, they shouldn't have to worry too much. I'm not saying they shouldn't read books about nutrition, or ask questions, but if the diet is varied then every meal doesn't need to feel like you're filling out some nutritional form of a tax return.....
It's easy to get enough protein on a vegan diet. But we do have to pay more attention than your average omni to getting enough of all the amino acids, especially lysine. That's all I'm saying. So many people post that they feel weak, faint, etc. after turning vegan and wonder about protein among other things and 99% of the time other vegans tell them they never have to worry about protein. Well, we don't exactly have to worry about it but we do have to pay more attention to it.

Good site all around for all things vegan. Here are her views on protein.

http://www.theveganrd.com/2014/02/pl...eed-beans.html
12-07-2014 04:16 PM
H=N/C
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capstan View Post
I'm sorry, do you think I meant broccoli and spinach are the only foods we can eat?
No, you meant that they're good sources of protein, and I explained that they aren't. 1 cup of spinach has 0.9g of protein. Its very healthy b/c of the micronutrients, but the protein content is negligible.
12-07-2014 04:03 PM
Tiger Lilly
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfie View Post
It is quite possible to get enough protein but not enough of the essential amino acids, especially lysine, on a vegan diet if you're not paying attention. I don't know why vegans get so uptight every time someone brings up protein. I still wonder how many ex-vegans are "ex" because they felt like crap after someone told them you never have to worry about protein.

Protein is one of the big myths about vegetarians and vegans, I guess that's the biggest sore point about the whole thing. We were told we 'couldn't' get enough protein, it's one of the lies we were told along with 'humane slaughter' and 'free range'.

I still get frustrated with people who tell me I "don't have to worry" about Iron. I do worry about it. I have a condition that requires me to worry about it.

At the same time, as long as someone is eating a varied vego diet, they shouldn't have to worry too much. I'm not saying they shouldn't read books about nutrition, or ask questions, but if the diet is varied then every meal doesn't need to feel like you're filling out some nutritional form of a tax return.....
12-06-2014 07:58 AM
Trishie I'm vegan and I get my protein from plants. My recent blood work came back great, always has

Beans, tofu (Non GMO), tempeh, seitan, non dairy milks, nuts, avocado, quinoa, flax, lentils, oats, hemp ... I'm sure a lot more, but as you can see there's an abundance
12-05-2014 10:58 PM
Wolfie It is quite possible to get enough protein but not enough of the essential amino acids, especially lysine, on a vegan diet if you're not paying attention. I don't know why vegans get so uptight every time someone brings up protein. I still wonder how many ex-vegans are "ex" because they felt like crap after someone told them you never have to worry about protein.
12-05-2014 10:53 PM
Wolfie If you go the vegan route, just be sure to get enough of the amino acid lysine. If you are getting enough lysine then you most likely are getting enough total protein. I, too, take a lysine supplement some days if I don't eat high-lysine foods.

http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/protein
12-05-2014 03:51 AM
Capstan
Quote:
Originally Posted by H=N/C View Post
Sure, spinach & broccoli are a higher % protein than beef. But you'd need to eat 14lbs of spinach or 9lbs of broccoli per day to meet your caloric needs. It can be tricky to get 50-60g of protein / day unless you have a lot of capacity for insoluble fiber or fall back on carcinogenic soy meats.
I'm sorry, do you think I meant broccoli and spinach are the only foods we can eat?
12-05-2014 02:39 AM
Naturebound
Quote:
Originally Posted by H=N/C View Post
Sure, spinach & broccoli are a higher % protein than beef. But you'd need to eat 14lbs of spinach or 9lbs of broccoli per day to meet your caloric needs. It can be tricky to get 50-60g of protein / day unless you have a lot of capacity for insoluble fiber or fall back on carcinogenic soy meats.
Most people wouldn't JUST eat those two foods to meet their protein needs each day. Soy is obviously not the only source of plant protein. You could easily meet 50 grams or more of plant protein per day without soy (or even gluten) by eating two or three servings of beans, three or four servings of grains (such as quinoa, oats etc), sweet potato, four or five servings of vegetables (in addition to fruits), and a few servings of seeds and/or nuts (and still be within a very reasonable calorie range). If one eats all raw, a blender can make consuming larger amounts of leafy greens, seeds etc easier. Spinach also cooks way down. I ate four packed cups of spinach for dinner the other day as part of a larger meal (that included quinoa, walnuts, and cherries). In less than one minute of light steaming it cooked down considerably. Of course, some people might claim the heat probably destroyed the nutrients in that spinach. Sighs.

You'd think vegans would be dropping dead right and left by now since our diets are so terrible. I don't see that happening though. Goes and gets ready for my daily 1.5 hour workout followed by eight hour work shift and then some errands and maybe a little studying as part of my work training and back on here tonight .
12-04-2014 06:14 PM
silva
Quote:
Originally Posted by H=N/C View Post
Sure, spinach & broccoli are a higher % protein than beef. But you'd need to eat 14lbs of spinach or 9lbs of broccoli per day to meet your caloric needs. It can be tricky to get 50-60g of protein / day unless you have a lot of capacity for insoluble fiber or fall back on carcinogenic soy meats.
The point is that other than some fruits, all foods contain protein. Unless you fill up your day with empty calories it really is easy to get 50 grams.
I don;t feel like tracking my last days, but here's a good example of a very typical diet:
http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/protein.php
12-04-2014 03:46 PM
H=N/C
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capstan View Post
Two of my favorites are spinach and broccoli. They have as much or more protein as beef. The cattlemen would have you believe only red meat can provide protein, but that's pure propaganda and blatantly false. Protein has become the subject of mythology.
Sure, spinach & broccoli are a higher % protein than beef. But you'd need to eat 14lbs of spinach or 9lbs of broccoli per day to meet your caloric needs. It can be tricky to get 50-60g of protein / day unless you have a lot of capacity for insoluble fiber or fall back on carcinogenic soy meats.
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