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  Topic Review (Newest First)
09-21-2013 10:49 AM
logic
Quote:
Originally Posted by natty6 View Post

I said in an earlier post that http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts will give you a chart displaying the amino acids contained and the amount they are contained in.
That site will list the amino acids in various foods, but it doesn't show how to combined proteins in the most optimal way which is what I was talking about. You'd have to do the math yourself.
09-17-2013 10:21 PM
natty6
Quote:
Originally Posted by logic View Post


You could calculate the ideal ratio by looking at the amino acid content of the various foods but I'm not aware of any chart that does this for you,

I said in an earlier post that http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts will give you a chart displaying the amino acids contained and the amount they are contained in. I forgot to mention though that there is a link at the bottom of the chart that says "find foods with complementary profile." For example, raw red tomatoes need foods with a high ratio of Leucine:Phenylalanine+Tyrosine, so it will search that for you when you click the link and comes up with results such as Sun Chips, Kellog's Corn Flakes, Hominy, and taco shells. 

So the answer to your question on pea (raw) compliment is http://nutritiondata.self.com/foods-000990600300000000000.html which lists raw kelp, chestnuts, raw kiwi, dry or cooked couscous, and more.

09-14-2013 12:44 AM
logic
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irizary View Post

You put it as a 1:1 ratio here of legumes and grains, to get 46g of protein.  Do you know the best ratios to get maximum complete protein for the fewest calories?  Is there a chart you know of for that?
You could calculate the ideal ratio by looking at the amino acid content of the various foods but I'm not aware of any chart that does this for you, but beyond nutritional curiosity, I think this sort of thing is overkill for someone trying to get adequate protein. Just being a bit mindful about complementary proteins and eating 10~15 grams more than the recommended intake (so 55~60 grams for women, 65~70 for men grams) should result in adequate protein intake without having to think much about all the nutritional details.

The above is pretty much standard nutrition advice, some people may word it a bit differently but it amounts to the same thing. For example, in Jack Norris article cited earlier by another poster he puts it in terms of lysine and suggests 1~1.2 grams of protein per kilogram. Lysine is usually the amino acid vegans are short on so increasing your lysine intake and making an effort to consume complementary proteins amounts to the same thing. And consuming 1~1.2 grams of protein per kilogram is roughly the same as consuming, for the average size person, 55~60 grams for a women and 65~70 for men.

So despite uniformity in the nutrition community, the vegetarian community has an old relationship with the issue.
09-14-2013 12:01 AM
Irizary
Quote:
Originally Posted by logic View Post


1 gram of rice protein isn't equivalent to 1 gram of egg protein, egg protein is high quality where as rice protein is incomplete so a woman could meet her protein needs by consuming 46 grams of egg protein but not 46 grams of rice protein. On the other hand if you consumed 23 grams of black bean protein and 23 grams of rice protein it would be just as good as the egg protein.

 

You put it as a 1:1 ratio here of legumes and grains, to get 46g of protein.  Do you know the best ratios to get maximum complete protein for the fewest calories?  Is there a chart you know of for that?

09-13-2013 11:04 PM
logic
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irizary View Post

If rice has 5 grams of protein per serving per a nutrition chart - isn't that 5 grams considered "usable" protein, even if uncomplemented?
Proteins are used whether or not they are complete, but they can be used for internal protein synthesis or energy and its the former that is the critical issue here. If your protein intake is overall incomplete you run the risk of preventing some protein synthesis from occurring since you'll be short on one or more amino acid.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irizary View Post

 So that even with the lysine limitation, that 5 grams is an accurate representation of how much protein is in that serving?  (I guess I might have thought that if it had more lysine, then the protein count would show higher.  Else those charts don't make much sense for single foods).
Yes its an accurate representation, but its measurement of the amount of protein and not the quality. 1 gram of rice protein isn't equivalent to 1 gram of egg protein, egg protein is high quality where as rice protein is incomplete so a woman could meet her protein needs by consuming 46 grams of egg protein but not 46 grams of rice protein. On the other hand if you consumed 23 grams of black bean protein and 23 grams of rice protein it would be just as good as the egg protein.

All this ignores absorption issues though, the amount of protein in foods just tells you about how much protein is in the food not how much you absorb. Protein from animal sources, on average, is absorbed at a higher rate than plant sources. Though some plant foods come close, like cooked legumes and grains.
09-13-2013 03:30 PM
Wolfie
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana View Post
 

 

Actually, the main reason for white lines or spots on nails is a zinc deficiency. You can't start self-diagnosing with symptoms such as this. Zinc deficiency, as well as selenium deficiency, is very common in ALL diets. Our agricultural methods have depleted the soil for zinc and selenium in many parts of the world.

 

It's really difficult to become protein deficient. Especially in such a short time !!  Essential amino acids are found in so many places. I know tons of vegans and never has one been protein deficient. B12 deficient, yes (and they only have themselves to blame because they didn't want to believe that their diet had a flaw, as if admitting this meant that they too had a flaw). Vitamin D deficient, sometimes. But not protein deficient.

 

And if you're into soya, like tofu for example, you have your complete protein anyway.

 

But B12... watch out for that. It's the most serious deficiency for vegans and must not be neglected.

 

You can have a normal total protein level but be deficient in certain essential amino acids. Routine blood work doesn't break down all the amino acids. You'd have to specifically ask for it.
09-13-2013 01:26 PM
Irizary
Quote:
Originally Posted by logic View Post


The amount of protein cited for foods is based on the total protein and isn't adjusted for the quality of the protein. So a gram of incomplete protein and a gram of complete protein would both be cited as "1 gram of protein" even though the biological effect is not the same.

 

Can you delineate this a little further?  

 

If rice has 5 grams of protein per serving per a nutrition chart - isn't that 5 grams considered "usable" protein, even if uncomplemented?  So that even with the lysine limitation, that 5 grams is an accurate representation of how much protein is in that serving?  (I guess I might have thought that if it had more lysine, then the protein count would show higher.  Else those charts don't make much sense for single foods).

09-13-2013 12:24 PM
logic
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana View Post

It's really difficult to become protein deficient. Especially in such a short time !!  Essential amino acids are found in so many places. I know tons of vegans and never has one been protein deficient. B12 deficient, yes (and they only have themselves to blame because they didn't want to believe that their diet had a flaw, as if admitting this meant that they too had a flaw). Vitamin D deficient, sometimes. But not protein deficient. 
Its difficult for those in developed countries to develop protein deficiency diseases, but protein deficiency diseases represent protein intake that is very far from adequate and a lot happens between the development of these diseases and having adequate protein intake. Its not black and white. On the other hand its not difficult to have low or marginal protein intake on a plant-based diet and this can have health consequences, just not the extreme sort seen in protein deficiency diseases. The body adjusts to lower protein intake (e.g., by producing thinner nails and hair), but it does so at the cost of your overall health.
09-13-2013 12:17 PM
logic
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irizary View Post

How is a protein value, say, for a grain (brown rice), calculated.at 5.03 g protein per serving
http://www.savvyvegetarian.com/articles/plant-food-protein-chart.pdf
- is that based on the limiting amino acid/s?  And then, if that grain is complemented with a bean, does the total protein value increase so it's not just the sum of the two protein values (rice and bean) - because it seems like there would actually be MORE protein than just the sum of the two, given how they complement each other...
The amount of protein cited for foods is based on the total protein and isn't adjusted for the quality of the protein. So a gram of incomplete protein and a gram of complete protein would both be cited as "1 gram of protein" even though the biological effect is not the same.

Complementing increases the quality of your overall protein intake and could potentially reduce the amount of protein you needed to consume, but the recommendations for protein are based on a mixed diet of plants, meat, etc so the assumed protein intake is high quality. But this is the problem, the recommendations aren't based on those eating a strictly plant-based diet and if someone's protein intake is overall incomplete they could fail to meet their protein needs even if they were consuming the daily recommended value.
09-13-2013 08:07 AM
natty6 Go to nitritiondata.self.com. You can search almost every food ever made, from packaged tv dinners to fresh peas. Also you can look up a food that is raw or steamed or baked, etc and it will show you the difference in restults. One section shows you the completeness of the protein. It has a graph showing which amino acids are present and how much as well gives it an overall completeness score. It also displays other great facts like inflammatory factors. If you really want to get serious about complete proteins you can use this website to research and calculate your own food combinations.
09-13-2013 03:16 AM
Diana
Quote:
Originally Posted by prismcolour View Post
 

 I'm concerned about protein intake because I noticed my nails currently have white lines across them (Muehrcke’s Nails) which is the first sign of a protein deficiency or a liver problem. 

 

Actually, the main reason for white lines or spots on nails is a zinc deficiency. You can't start self-diagnosing with symptoms such as this. Zinc deficiency, as well as selenium deficiency, is very common in ALL diets. Our agricultural methods have depleted the soil for zinc and selenium in many parts of the world.

 

It's really difficult to become protein deficient. Especially in such a short time !!  Essential amino acids are found in so many places. I know tons of vegans and never has one been protein deficient. B12 deficient, yes (and they only have themselves to blame because they didn't want to believe that their diet had a flaw, as if admitting this meant that they too had a flaw). Vitamin D deficient, sometimes. But not protein deficient. 

 

And if you're into soya, like tofu for example, you have your complete protein anyway. 

 

But B12... watch out for that. It's the most serious deficiency for vegans and must not be neglected.

09-13-2013 02:12 AM
logic
Quote:
Originally Posted by La Grenouille View Post

All right, I see what you mean. But in that case, there is still no need to use another food item to “complete” the protein, as per the so-called “myth”. All you have to do is eat more, but it can be of the same food item... Right?
In the example, since the protein still contained a reasonable amount of lysine, you could make up for the incompleteness by consuming 59 grams instead of 46 grams. But if the protein was even more deficient in lysine, say it contained just 20 mg per gram, then you'd have to consume around 110 grams. At some point it would be difficult to make up for the incompleteness of the protein with increased consumption.

In any case, if your overall protein intake is not complete (e.g., you're not consuming complementary proteins) than you're going to need to consume more protein. How much more? That depends on the details of your diet. Alternatively, you can take some basic measures to consume complementary proteins and not worry to much about it. As someone else mentioned, for vegans the main issue tends to be lysine since most plants have low levels. Dealing with this is as easy as eating 3 or so servings of legumes a day (legumes being one of the plants that have high levels of lysine).

As for the graph, its misleading. The graph shows that amounts of amino acids in some select foods if those foods made up your entire diet. The author wrongly concludes from this that these proteins are complete. I'm really not sure why people like to consider a diet that consists of one whole food because nobody eats this way.
09-12-2013 02:17 PM
OakBlossoms Are the lines pretty much in the same area on each nail? That can be a sign of an infection. It doesn't show up till later when the nail beds grow out.
09-12-2013 01:49 PM
Irizary

How is a protein value, say, for a grain (brown rice), calculated.at 5.03 g protein per serving

http://www.savvyvegetarian.com/articles/plant-food-protein-chart.pdf

- is that based on the limiting amino acid/s?  And then, if that grain is complemented with a bean, does the total protein value increase so it's not just the sum of the two protein values (rice and bean) - because it seems like there would actually be MORE protein than just the sum of the two, given how they complement each other...

 

Can anyone explain further?

09-12-2013 04:57 AM
La Grenouille
Quote:
Originally Posted by logic View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by La Grenouille View Post

logic, wouldn’t the same apply if that same woman ate a piece of flesh in such a quantity that she would only be getting 40g of lysine? Wouldn’t she still have to up the quantity of “this same protein” to get her needs?
If the flesh was an incomplete protein that was lacking in lysine yes, but all the commonly consumed meats are complete proteins so they would just need to consume 46 grams not the 59 grams required in the case of the example incomplete protein (and most plant proteins have low levels of lysine, often lower than the example).
All right, I see what you mean. But in that case, there is still no need to use another food item to “complete” the protein, as per the so-called “myth”. All you have to do is eat more, but it can be of the same food item... Right?

You haven’t answered my question about the table in the article. I’m very curious about that.
09-11-2013 10:44 PM
logic
Quote:
Originally Posted by La Grenouille View Post

logic, wouldn’t the same apply if that same woman ate a piece of flesh in such a quantity that she would only be getting 40g of lysine? Wouldn’t she still have to up the quantity of “this same protein” to get her needs?
If the flesh was an incomplete protein that was lacking in lysine yes, but all the commonly consumed meats are complete proteins so they would just need to consume 46 grams not the 59 grams required in the case of the example incomplete protein (and most plant proteins have low levels of lysine, often lower than the example).
Quote:
Originally Posted by La Grenouille View Post

The way I read the article, and the way I read your explanation, that simply means you have to up your intake of protein, because the amnio acids content can be lower in plants than in flesh. Not because it is incomplete.
Actually, its because the protein is incomplete that you'd have to increase your intake. You seem to be thinking of "incomplete protein" has a protein that is missing one of the 9 essential amino acids, but the definition is as I described (and by all means, you can confirm it on wiki or any nutrition text), a protein is incomplete if it contains less (not necessarily missing) of one or more of the 9 essential acids than is specified in the "suggested pattern" specified in my previous post.
Quote:
Originally Posted by La Grenouille View Post

What I’m wondering, too, is if animals also need those amino acids, or do they get all they need from plant? More particularly, do we know if herbivore animals are able to,produce all the amino acids they need, or if they also need to supplement them through diet?
Different animals have different amino acid requirements, both in terms of what is and isn't essential and in the ratios, but they all have essential amino acid requirements. Herbivorous animals have to obtain amino acids from their diet.
09-11-2013 04:20 PM
Wolfie

The article I posted a link to above, that speaks about paying attention to lysine, was written by vegan dieticians. Just wanted to point that out.

09-11-2013 04:53 AM
La Grenouille
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvourmother View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by logic View Post


Any protein that does not supply an equal or greater amount of one of the above values is concerned an incomplete protein and any protein that supplies them in equal or greater amounts is complete. The author of the article confuses matters, he looks at the amount of amino acids in select foods when those foods make up your entire diet and suggests that because they meet your protein needs they are "complete", that is wrong, instead what he is showing is that in some cases you can meet your protein needs by consuming incomplete proteins. In these cases you simply have to eat more of the protein. For example, assuming a protein matches the above except that lysine is 40 mg per gram instead of 51 mg, in this case if a woman consumed 46 grams of this protein it wouldn't be sufficient because she wouldn't get enough lysine. But if she consumed 59 grams of this same protein she would meet her protein needs.
.

Therefore proving that combining incomplete proteins is unnecessary and essentially a myth.
I would tend to agree with luvourmother...

logic, wouldn’t the same apply if that same woman ate a piece of flesh in such a quantity that she would only be getting 40g of lysine? Wouldn’t she still have to up the quantity of “this same protein” to get her needs? You’re saying this woman would only have to eat more of the same thing to get a “complete protein”. Why wouldn’t the quantity factor make a flesh protein incomplete, if that makes it so of a plant protein?

The way I read the article, and the way I read your explanation, that simply means you have to up your intake of protein, because the amnio acids content can be lower in plants than in flesh. Not because it is incomplete. And the graph he displays clearly shows that some vegetable proteins give higher ratio of amino acids than the recommended intake. Is that graph just plain wrong?


What I’m wondering, too, is if animals also need those amino acids, or do they get all they need from plant? More particularly, do we know if herbivore animals are able to,produce all the amino acids they need, or if they also need to supplement them through diet?
09-11-2013 12:47 AM
luvourmother
Quote:
Originally Posted by logic View Post


Any protein that does not supply an equal or greater amount of one of the above values is concerned an incomplete protein and any protein that supplies them in equal or greater amounts is complete. The author of the article confuses matters, he looks at the amount of amino acids in select foods when those foods make up your entire diet and suggests that because they meet your protein needs they are "complete", that is wrong, instead what he is showing is that in some cases you can meet your protein needs by consuming incomplete proteins. In these cases you simply have to eat more of the protein. For example, assuming a protein matches the above except that lysine is 40 mg per gram instead of 51 mg, in this case if a woman consumed 46 grams of this protein it wouldn't be sufficient because she wouldn't get enough lysine. But if she consumed 59 grams of this same protein she would meet her protein needs.
.

Therefore proving that combining incomplete proteins is unnecessary and essentially a myth.
09-11-2013 12:03 AM
logic
Quote:
Originally Posted by La Grenouille View Post

Can you enlighten me here? I read the article, and I musn’t understand what a complete protein is either... Any help would be appreciated.
There are 9 essential amino acids but each of these is utilized at a different rate during protein synthesis so you not only need to consume the 9 essential amino acids but they have to be consumed in the ratio required by the human body otherwise some protein synthesis will not occur, the suggested pattern (abbreviating the amino acids) per gram of protein as specified by the WHO is:

Try: 6 mg
His: 18 mg
Met: 25 mg
Iso: 25 mg
Thre: 27 mg
val: 32 mg
Lys: 51
Phe: 47
Leu: 55

Any protein that does not supply an equal or greater amount of one of the above values is concerned an incomplete protein and any protein that supplies them in equal or greater amounts is complete. The author of the article confuses matters, he looks at the amount of amino acids in select foods when those foods make up your entire diet and suggests that because they meet your protein needs they are "complete", that is wrong, instead what he is showing is that in some cases you can meet your protein needs by consuming incomplete proteins. In these cases you simply have to eat more of the protein. For example, assuming a protein matches the above except that lysine is 40 mg per gram instead of 51 mg, in this case if a woman consumed 46 grams of this protein it wouldn't be sufficient because she wouldn't get enough lysine. But if she consumed 59 grams of this same protein she would meet her protein needs.

But this is why the standard recommendations for protein may be too low for vegans, vegans are more often than not consuming incomplete proteins and the proteins are also absorbed at lower rates.
09-10-2013 11:48 PM
Wolfie

My advice: Listen to logic. And get enough lysine.

09-10-2013 10:00 PM
La Grenouille
Quote:
Originally Posted by logic View Post

The second article you are citing is clearly getting things wrong, the author doesn't seem to understand the definition of a complete protein.
Can you enlighten me here? I read the article, and I musn’t understand what a complete protein is either... Any help would be appreciated.
09-10-2013 09:58 PM
La Grenouille
Quote:
Originally Posted by logic View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by La Grenouille View Post

Logic : Thin hair and brittle nails can also be a symptom of hypothyroidism. Even vegans can have hypothyroidism.
I didn't suggest that low-protein intake was the sole cause of this, it can be caused by a number of diseases and nutritional issues. What I said is that when you see this in vegans especially newer ones, its usually (in my view) the result of inadequate protein intake.
I guess the text I put in bold here wasn’t there. It sounded more like an affirmation than an opinion.
09-10-2013 09:54 PM
La Grenouille
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvourmother View Post


OP: More info on Muehrcke’s Nails here-
http://www.doctorshangout.com/profiles/blogs/what-does-it-mean-if-you-have


Second, the picture in the link is not muehrcke's, it is nail trauma. .
Then it appears all I had was nail trauma! (Silly me)
09-10-2013 07:37 PM
logic
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvourmother View Post

Processed foods can fit into a diet that meets protein requirements, it does not need to be strictly whole foods.  
I didn't suggests that processed foods prevent one from meeting their protein requirement, instead I pointed out that you're taking things out of context in regard to the articles you're quoting. In the contest of a diet that consists solely of whole foods its pretty difficult not to consume enough protein because whole foods all contain protein.....but the same can't be said of processed foods. A number of processed foods have been stripped of their protein as such a vegan diet that includes processed foods can easily supply insufficient protein.

Quote:
Originally Posted by luvourmother View Post

It is practically impossible not to get enough protein when sufficient calories are consumed.  
This is true in the context of a whole foods diet, but its not true in general. There are numerous commonly consumed processed/junk foods that contain little to no protein, meat eaters can get away with consuming these foods because they derive most of their protein from meat where as vegans have to be more careful.
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvourmother View Post

7 large baked potatoes = 2,000 calories, 52 grams of protein, and more than twice the RDA for amino acids
This would be a whole foods based diet and potatoes happen to contain complete proteins so this example is cherry picked as most plant proteins aren't complete. Consider instead walnuts, 2,000 calories of walnuts would supply around 46 grams of protein but it wouldn't be adequate because walnuts contain too little lysine. Now consider processed foods, 2,000 calories of french fries contains around 25 grams of protein.

These considerations ignore protein absorption rates though, plant proteins are absorbed at lower rates so its very plausible that vegans need to consume more than the recommended intakes.
09-10-2013 02:51 PM
luvourmother
Quote:
Originally Posted by logic View Post

 If one is consuming a diet that is solely based on a variety of whole plant foods one is likely to meet their protein needs....but not because the ideas around complimentary proteins are wrong but instead because your protein intake will usually end up being complimentary on a daily basis. But few people consume this style of diet therefore this sort of information is misleading for the general public. Its not difficult to consume inadequate protein in the context of standard diets when you remove the animal foods.
 

 

Processed foods can fit into a diet that meets protein requirements, it does not need to be strictly whole foods.  Many vegans follow this kind of diet and have found no problem getting necessary amino acids.  

 

It is practically impossible not to get enough protein when sufficient calories are consumed.  Any idea the percent of protein deficiency in the US or UK or better yet among vegetarians and vegans? 

 

7 large baked potatoes = 2,000 calories, 52 grams of protein, and more than twice the RDA for amino acids

Eating complimentary foods isn't even necessary to get the daily values of amino acids.

09-10-2013 10:36 AM
logic
Quote:
Originally Posted by La Grenouille View Post

Logic : Thin hair and brittle nails can also be a symptom of hypothyroidism. Even vegans can have hypothyroidism.
I didn't suggest that low-protein intake was the sole cause of this, it can be caused by a number of diseases and nutritional issues. What I said is that when you see this in vegans especially newer ones, its usually (in my view) the result of inadequate protein intake.
09-10-2013 10:28 AM
logic
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvourmother View Post

http://www.diseaseproof.com/archives/diet-myths-complementary-protein-myth-wont-go-away.html
http://michaelbluejay.com/veg/protein.html
http://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2007nl/apr/protein.htm
Essentially all amino acid requirements can be satisfied with sufficient calories from just potatoes.

Low protein intake is concurrent with low calorie intake. If sufficient calories are consumed, protein levels will most likely be adequate.
The second article you are citing is clearly getting things wrong, the author doesn't seem to understand the definition of a complete protein. The others aren't conflicting with what I've said and they are speaking from a very particular context, namely from the perspective of a diet composed solely of whole plant foods. If one is consuming a diet that is solely based on a variety of whole plant foods one is likely to meet their protein needs....but not because the ideas around complimentary proteins are wrong but instead because your protein intake will usually end up being complimentary on a daily basis. But few people consume this style of diet therefore this sort of information is misleading for the general public. Its not difficult to consume inadequate protein in the context of standard diets when you remove the animal foods.

So while the idea that you have to combine proteins on a per meal basis is "a myth" that was never rooted in science, the idea that you have to consume a diet that provides overall complete proteins on a daily basis is not. The latter simply follows from the fact that humans need a particular ratio of the 9 essential amino acids and since plants usually don't supply that ratio, in themselves, you have to combine a variety of plants together to get it.

Anyhow, the standard recommendations for protein intake for an averaged sized woman is around 45 grams assuming a relatively sedentary lifestyle. But there are good reasons as to why vegans may need to consume more and since we don't have good studies that tell us that the standard recommendations are also appropriate for vegans, a "better safe than sorry" approach would be to consume an extra 10~15 grams. This isn't difficult to achieve and there is no harm in consuming excess plant protein, it will just get converted into carbohydrates if not utilized for tissue synthesis.
09-10-2013 09:24 AM
alis

I'll give you an example of today's lunch. Soup. 200g tofu (34g protein), 79g brown rice noodles (6g protein), 1 onion, 3 garlic, 2 cup veggie broth (4g protein), 2 cups dark greens (4g protein), plus mushrooms and sesame oil.

 

That's 48g protein in one vegan soup, a decent amount of carbs, and a good number of healthy oils. 40g should not be a problem, maybe some cooking help can fix this.

09-10-2013 09:21 AM
luvourmother
Quote:
Originally Posted by prismcolour View Post

@luvourmother I haven't gotten blood work done because I've only been plant-based for 3 months.  I'm concerned about protein intake because I noticed my nails currently have white lines across them (Muehrcke’s Nails) which is the first sign of a protein deficiency or a liver problem.  I don't drink alcohol and have no prior history of liver problems so I am deducing it's from my diet change and lack of protein or I am eating enough protein but the quality of the protein/amino acid profile is not giving me adequate nutrition in the protein department.  I had no lines on my nails when I still had some dairy and eggs before going 100% plant based.

More info on Muehrcke’s Nails here-
http://www.doctorshangout.com/profiles/blogs/what-does-it-mean-if-you-have
Ok, first of all the blog you linked directly suggests seeing a doctor and getting blood tests done.
Second, the picture in the link is not muehrcke's, it is nail trauma. Confusing why they would put a picture of something they describe is exactly not muehrcke's : "Muehrcke’s nails usually extend across the entire nail bed horizontally from edge to edge whereas trauma lines typically only involve a portion of the nail and affect only a few fingers"
Third, it is very unlikely that a protein deficiency can occur if adequate calories are consumed. Make sure you are eating around 2,000 calories per day.
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