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  Topic Review (Newest First)
05-18-2013 11:18 AM
Joan Kennedy

Managers impose all sorts of things on their employees that can be seen as arbitrary and intrusive, but that employees tolerate anyway as being the employer's call. Dress codes, flextime and telecommuting rules, whether an employee is or isn't allowed to take unpaid time off, how much employees have to contribute to their own health insurance premiums, official policy about workplace romances. Whether to offer paid leave for new fathers, whether health insurance will or won't cover birth control, or cover infertility treatment. Whether everyone has to work a little longer each day so the whole workplace can shut down between Christmas and New Years. It's all up to them, and we can like it or lump it.

 

I don't see the vegan-only policy as any more intrusive than any of that, and it's completely in line with the organization's official mission. The only thing is that it seems a little tone-deaf, especially since so many of the employees aren't vegan. The tone-deaf part  is that it reinforces the old stereotype vegans have to fight all the time: that "vegetarians watch what they eat, but vegans watch what you eat." Almost everything that reinforces a stereotype is worth thinking very hard about before turning it into a mandatory policy. If I were setting policy at a place like PCRM, I might limit the rule to any food that's brought in to share, as in birthday cakes, snacks that are set out for all, catered lunches, pot-lucks, etc. That makes life a lot easier for the many vegans who work there, and makes vegan food available and enticing for the uninitiated to try out. I might also try to engage the non-vegans at the office with voluntary 30-day challenges and such, but without penalizing those who didn't participate.

05-17-2013 06:38 PM
La Grenouille
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purp View Post

On the upside, La Grenouille's school kids office workers got 70% cocoa dark chocolate drops that day. It must've been someone's visit from Aunt Flo.tongue3.gif
Ha! Too funny!
05-16-2013 12:45 PM
Purp
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennifer C View Post

I just saw that the offices at the non-profit organization Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine are totally, 100% vegan via an office policy

 

Then of course the people who think this is nuts chime in, like here: 

 

 

 

I agree there's plenty of vegan junk food available but I disagree with the soy issue AND I especially think it's nutty that someone thinks it sounds too difficult to eat one vegan meal a day - I mean assuming people there work regular hours. 

 

How often do we have to deal with meat in the workplace? Like people can't deal with no meat for once. I think it's a good policy that's notable at the very least for being outside the box. 

 

What do you think of a eat vegan or eat at home policy at work?

I'll work here with absolute joy!! Are they hiring? Did you see the two comments beneath the initial commenter's post?

05-16-2013 12:43 PM
Purp
Quote:
Originally Posted by La Grenouille View Post


No, I'm in Canada. The Ministry of Education has passed a “Healthy School Law”, banning all junk food from schools, including lunchboxes. Obviously, ti's applied to the discretion of the person involved.

However, the story you relate concerns one school, in Bondy. The parents received a message saying that kids would have to eat the meat served at the cantine. It wasn't aimed at veg*ns, though, but for people who asked for Kosher or Halal food to be served at school. The school director was very dumb to send out such a message to everyone... She says some kids saw meat and would refuse to eat it, because their parents forbid it for religious reasons. Some kids would cry, she says. In her letter, she said “Kids will have to eat all their meat.” Nice.

She has withdrawn from her stance, but still... I wonder what she'd do with my daughter, who goes beserk when she doesn't have a veggie choice!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LedBoots View Post


Are you in France? Awhile back there was a story that a law was passed that all school lunches in France, or part of France, were required to serve meat. Is that true?

I love bentos! :-D

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by La Grenouille View Post

Talk about school! The school my kids go to has a health policy. No crappy food can be sent in lunch boxes.

 

I don't mind. I make great Bento lunches for my kids, always colourful, always home made food... But...

 

This one day I hadn't had time to prepare a dessert for them, so I put in 70% cocoa dark chocolate drops instead, with fresh strawberries. I do my best to give my kids healthy foods, and high cocoa content chocolate is healthy. To make sure, I put in a paper where I drew the whole menu, saying, for the Dessert section: ”Healthy 70% cocoa dark chocolate drops”. So... I get a call from the school:

 

Sorry, Mam, but we had to confiscate your kid's desserts today,” the lady said.

“And why is that, if I may so inquire?” I said.

”Well, they were candies. They're not allowed candies.” she said.

“But they are healthy ‘candies’!” I said.

“I know, but they still look like candies,” she said.

So I asked: “Can I send a chocolate cake for dessert?”

“Yes.”

“Can I send a commercial Swiss Roll cake?”

“Yes.”

“Can I send cookies?”

“Yes.”

“Can I send really buttery, sugary and cholocaty cookies?”

“Yes.”

“I can send them all that junk, but I'm not allowed to send them healthy chocolate drops because they look like candies?”

“...”

“Next time you want to deprive my kids of their desserts, call me first and explain to my why, OK?”

 

The very next day I sent them back with chocolate drops. They didn't call me, but they let my kids eat them.

 

Some people have no idea what healthy foods are.

Both of you made me very happy I don't have kids. Particularly school age kids. Where's the common sense these days, anyways?dizzy2.gif

 

On the upside, La Grenouille's school kids office workers got 70% cocoa dark chocolate drops that day. It must've been someone's visit from Aunt Flo.tongue3.gif

05-16-2013 08:10 AM
Joan Kennedy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Lilly View Post



Meat smells 'more' to me.

So, I might not notice seitan, but I have a better chance of noticing if something smells like meat.

Maybe the sauce would hide it though.
 


I can pick out the aromas of familiar meats (lamb, chicken,steak, bacon) while they're cooking or they're right out of the oven, especially if they're light on herbs and sauces. Each kind of fat gives off a different odor. But not so much when food is served chilled, and especially not when it's on anyone else's plate. And not when, like a Chinese dish, there's a little bit of meat mixed in with sauce and a lot of other foods. A dish like that, even microwaved, wouldn't knock me over with meat odors unless it was fishy. So in most instances, I believe, meat could be passed off as seitan if someone meant for it to be. At least I think it would be easier than penny79 thinks it would.

 

The article didn't say, but they probably would expect meat-eaters to at least be discreet if they were occasionally violating the food policy. That would mean no Dinty Moore stew cans in the trash, no Swanson microwave meals, no Kraft Mac n Cheese boxes, etc. And for the tech guy who's so much more useful and friendly than their last tech guy was, maybe a little bit of looking the other way if it came to that. At least that's how most offices seem to run, when they're asking something of their people that some of them might find challenging.

05-15-2013 10:54 PM
Tiger Lilly
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joan Kennedy View Post


Maybe my senses aren't as intact as I thought they were. Seitan doesn't really have a smell, at least nothing that I could ever recognize as seitan. There's nothing striking about it, it smells like whatever I cook it in, or whatever flavorings I use to deepen its flavor. Seitan "wings" and chicken wings in the same sauce would smell the same to me. There's not much aroma coming off a cold dish, like General Tso's Vegan Chicken behind the deli counter at Whole Foods. I'll grant you that if someone puts fish in a microwave, they're busted.



Meat smells 'more' to me.

So, I might not notice seitan, but I have a better chance of noticing if something smells like meat.

Maybe the sauce would hide it though.
 

05-15-2013 10:53 PM
ElaineV Clearly I think it's a fine policy. But even if I didn't its not practical to challenge it. Challenging a policy like PCRM's would likely only result in the removal of a lunchroom and a new policy of 'no food in the workplace.' That, or they'll just use volunteers and interns instead of paid employees.
05-15-2013 07:50 PM
Joan Kennedy
Quote:
Originally Posted by penny79 View Post

sorry, but around a bunch of vegans, or people who eat reasonably healthy and have intact senses, you're not going to get away with a lie that your meat is actually seitan.  they smell strikingly different.  lol


Maybe my senses aren't as intact as I thought they were. Seitan doesn't really have a smell, at least nothing that I could ever recognize as seitan. There's nothing striking about it, it smells like whatever I cook it in, or whatever flavorings I use to deepen its flavor. Seitan "wings" and chicken wings in the same sauce would smell the same to me. There's not much aroma coming off a cold dish, like General Tso's Vegan Chicken behind the deli counter at Whole Foods. I'll grant you that if someone puts fish in a microwave, they're busted.

05-15-2013 07:28 PM
penny79

sorry, but around a bunch of vegans, or people who eat reasonably healthy and have intact senses, you're not going to get away with a lie that your meat is actually seitan.  they smell strikingly different.  lol

05-15-2013 07:05 PM
La Grenouille Let me correct my error. The case I'm talking about is new, and happened in April this year.

However, there was a by-law passed in 2012 which effectuvely renders meat mandatory in meals offered by the schools. I see there are many lobbies against this, but I don't know where it's at yet. Gosh. I used to like the French!
05-15-2013 05:36 PM
La Grenouille
Quote:
Originally Posted by LedBoots View Post

Are you in France? Awhile back there was a story that a law was passed that all school lunches in France, or part of France, were required to serve meat. Is that true?

! :-D

No, I'm in Canada. The Ministry of Education has passed a “Healthy School Law”, banning all junk food from schools, including lunchboxes. Obviously, ti's applied to the discretion of the person involved.

However, the story you relate concerns one school, in Bondy. The parents received a message saying that kids would have to eat the meat served at the cantine. It wasn't aimed at veg*ns, though, but for people who asked for Kosher or Halal food to be served at school. The school director was very dumb to send out such a message to everyone... She says some kids saw meat and would refuse to eat it, because their parents forbid it for religious reasons. Some kids would cry, she says. In her letter, she said “Kids will have to eat all their meat.” Nice.

She has withdrawn from her stance, but still... I wonder what she'd do with my daughter, who goes beserk when she doesn't have a veggie choice!
05-15-2013 03:37 PM
Joan Kennedy

I worked as a technical writer or in communications at a fair number of organizations in DC whose mission didn't mean that much to me one way or the other. When I was between jobs, openings might come up at NRA headquarters, or one of the many conservative Christian lobbies, or on some abstinence-only sex education contract. I never applied to any of those, but if it had taken a lot longer than it did to find work in my field, who knows? It's easy to imagine not everyone who works at PCRM is necessarily on board with the vegan-only message. But people can always go out to lunch, and I'm sure many do.

During my meat eating days, if I had been temping there, or working in PCRM's IT department, I probably would have tried to be compliant with their policy, and maybe even taken to it, if I liked the people there. It's just lunch. If I'd been bringing contraband from home, I probably would have learned early on to say, "Nope, not meat. It's seitan! Why?"

05-15-2013 02:44 PM
LedBoots
Quote:
Originally Posted by La Grenouille View Post

Talk about school! The school my kids go to has a health policy. No crappy food can be sent in lunch boxes.

 

I don't mind. I make great Bento lunches for my kids, always colourful, always home made food... But...

 

This one day I hadn't had time to prepare a dessert for them, so I put in 70% cocoa dark chocolate drops instead, with fresh strawberries. I do my best to give my kids healthy foods, and high cocoa content chocolate is healthy. To make sure, I put in a paper where I drew the whole menu, saying, for the Dessert section: ”Healthy 70% cocoa dark chocolate drops”. So... I get a call from the school:

 

“Sorry, Mam, but we had to confiscate your kid's desserts today,” the lady said.

“And why is that, if I may so inquire?” I said.

”Well, they were candies. They're not allowed candies.” she said.

“But they are healthy ‘candies’!” I said.

“I know, but they still look like candies,” she said.

So I asked: “Can I send a chocolate cake for dessert?”

“Yes.”

“Can I send a commercial Swiss Roll cake?”

“Yes.”

“Can I send cookies?”

“Yes.”

“Can I send really buttery, sugary and cholocaty cookies?”

“Yes.”

“I can send them all that junk, but I'm not allowed to send them healthy chocolate drops because they look like candies?”

“...”

“Next time you want to deprive my kids of their desserts, call me first and explain to my why, OK?”

 

The very next day I sent them back with chocolate drops. They didn't call me, but they let my kids eat them.

 

Some people have no idea what healthy foods are.

Are you in France? Awhile back there was a story that a law was passed that all school lunches in France, or part of France, were required to serve meat. Is that true?

I love bentos! :-D
05-15-2013 11:12 AM
La Grenouille
Quote:
Originally Posted by peace View Post

A person is not going to work at PCRM, a group dedicated to promoting vegan diets and alternatives to animals in research, if they are not at least open and receptive to veganism. It's PCRM, for Pete's sake, not Wal-Mart.

 

Actually, a commenter replied to that saying that in this economy, a job is a job is a job. 

05-15-2013 10:34 AM
peace

A person is not going to work at PCRM, a group dedicated to promoting vegan diets and alternatives to animals in research, if they are not at least open and receptive to veganism. It's PCRM, for Pete's sake, not Wal-Mart.

05-15-2013 09:46 AM
La Grenouille

Talk about school! The school my kids go to has a health policy. No crappy food can be sent in lunch boxes.

 

I don't mind. I make great Bento lunches for my kids, always colourful, always home made food... But...

 

This one day I hadn't had time to prepare a dessert for them, so I put in 70% cocoa dark chocolate drops instead, with fresh strawberries. I do my best to give my kids healthy foods, and high cocoa content chocolate is healthy. To make sure, I put in a paper where I drew the whole menu, saying, for the Dessert section: ”Healthy 70% cocoa dark chocolate drops”. So... I get a call from the school:

 

“Sorry, Mam, but we had to confiscate your kid's desserts today,” the lady said.

“And why is that, if I may so inquire?” I said.

”Well, they were candies. They're not allowed candies.” she said.

“But they are healthy ‘candies’!” I said.

“I know, but they still look like candies,” she said.

So I asked: “Can I send a chocolate cake for dessert?”

“Yes.”

“Can I send a commercial Swiss Roll cake?”

“Yes.”

“Can I send cookies?”

“Yes.”

“Can I send really buttery, sugary and cholocaty cookies?”

“Yes.”

“I can send them all that junk, but I'm not allowed to send them healthy chocolate drops because they look like candies?”

“...”

“Next time you want to deprive my kids of their desserts, call me first and explain to my why, OK?”

 

The very next day I sent them back with chocolate drops. They didn't call me, but they let my kids eat them.

 

Some people have no idea what healthy foods are.

05-15-2013 08:05 AM
Jennifer C
Quote:
Originally Posted by La Grenouille View Post

I gave birth in a Jewish hospital. I'm not Jewish, but the hospital accepts people from all religions (or none). However, they do have a kosher food policy. The whole food court area is kosher, and the food served there is all kosher. There are signs asking people not to bring food from the outside. Well, some dude ignored this and brought in his lunch, some say a ham sandwich, but I don't have that kind of detail. Anyway, non-kosher food.

He was asked to take his lunch to the employees' room, the only non kosher area of the hospital. He refused. Which, when you think about it, was crass. He could have just gone in another room, no fuss, and it would have been the end of it. But no.

Well, it ended up in a Human Rights complaints, and the dude won. The ruling says the hospital failed to accomodate him, and violated his freedom on conscience and religion, and the hospital had to pay $10,000 to these employees (I know, it may not seem much to US people, but here in Canada, such rulings don't get much higher than that and this one was considered way over the top).

I am already seeing people using some “human rights” argument to sue this organisation. And in Canada, I'm afraid they'd win.

WOW!

 

That's crazy. What really gets me is that it's okay to ban foods based on health, but not ethical or personal beliefs - OR health beliefs surrounding meat or dairy (which I think are really unhealthy). A ton of schools I know of ban nuts now because a few kids are "allergic" even though research shows that few kids are actually, medically proven allergic to nuts. No one would sue a school over this. Many, many schools now have zero waste policies where you cannot bring plastic water bottles - you have to bring reusable. 

 

I can't believe that guy won that case. That's the biggest damn joke I've heard in a while. That guy is going to have some horrid karma. 

05-15-2013 05:03 AM
La Grenouille I gave birth in a Jewish hospital. I'm not Jewish, but the hospital accepts people from all religions (or none). However, they do have a kosher food policy. The whole food court area is kosher, and the food served there is all kosher. There are signs asking people not to bring food from the outside. Well, some dude ignored this and brought in his lunch, some say a ham sandwich, but I don't have that kind of detail. Anyway, non-kosher food.

He was asked to take his lunch to the employees' room, the only non kosher area of the hospital. He refused. Which, when you think about it, was crass. He could have just gone in another room, no fuss, and it would have been the end of it. But no.

Well, it ended up in a Human Rights complaints, and the dude won. The ruling says the hospital failed to accomodate him, and violated his freedom on conscience and religion, and the hospital had to pay $10,000 to these employees (I know, it may not seem much to US people, but here in Canada, such rulings don't get much higher than that and this one was considered way over the top).

I am already seeing people using some “human rights” argument to sue this organisation. And in Canada, I'm afraid they'd win.
05-15-2013 04:18 AM
Tiger Lilly

I would love an office like this!

No more food contamination, no more scrubbing the microwave to make sure it was clean before putting my own stuff in there, being able to keep a big container of soy milk in the fridge because everyone would be using it (rather than a crappy little poppa that I would take to work), swapping recipes, being able to say "Yes, I WOULD like a bite of your lunch, it smells delicious!".

As for the ones who can't go a whole meal without meat, they're usually the ones who tell me how much they love a good roast-

 

"Especially the roast potatoes"

 

"You know those are vegan, right?"
 

05-14-2013 06:41 PM
Jennifer C
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4everaspirit View Post

 

Also, they CLEARLY let others know that it's all vegan in their offices....they aren't mandating what others eat at home.  Instead of getting your panties in a bunch about it, how about people just not work there if they are going to whine about it? No one is forcing them to stay. The car wash down the street is hiring.........................

 

Lunitics can't go a meal without meat......geez. I think all the hormones from the meat are making people crazy.

I know. Lots of offices have policies - no smoking, must recycle, must use reusable water bottles, etc. I don't see how this is any different. 

 

I do agree that meat eaters seem to be unable to go one flipping meal sans meat. It's nuts because most meat eaters I know for sure don't eat meat with every meal, but tell them they can't have it and they go wacky. 

05-14-2013 05:56 PM
4everaspirit

People wanting to nitpick about this? WOW. 

 

I love Physicans Committe For Responsible Medicine, and I love them even more know that I know their offices are vegan.

 

I don't get what others are going on about. They are an organization OPPOSED to animal testing for both and humanitarian reasons, therefore it's logical that they also wouldn't want animal foods around. It would make no sense to be fighitng to stop animals from being tested on, yet eating animals that have been tortured and exploited as well. o_o

 

This person's comment irks me "I'd probably sneak eat whatever I wanted to in my office. Or make a big leafy green sandwhich with turkey hidden in the middle. mmmmm. No matter what they say, unless they scrutinize your food every morning, they are never going to know what you are eating"

 

Like....do they even know what the organization is about?? If they did, they wouldn't be such a selfish moron. These types of people would ultimately also "sneak" about other things in your organization and we all know where such things can lead. If I was in charge these are the people I WOULDN'T hire.

 

Also, they CLEARLY let others know that it's all vegan in their offices....they aren't mandating what others eat at home.  Instead of getting your panties in a bunch about it, how about people just not work there if they are going to whine about it? No one is forcing them to stay. The car wash down the street is hiring.........................

 

Lunitics can't go a meal without meat......geez. I think all the hormones from the meat are making people crazy.

05-14-2013 03:40 PM
Jennifer C

I just saw that the offices at the non-profit organization Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine are totally, 100% vegan via an office policy

 

Then of course the people who think this is nuts chime in, like here: 

 

 

Quote:

 

"I've gotta say, this is extreme. While I appreciate what the organization is trying to promote, and it sounds like they're doing a good job inspiring their employees to eat healthier overall and share healthy, homemade breakfasts and lunches, they're missing the mark. Though it has notable benefits, going vegan isn't necessarily for everyone. Nor is it necessarily going to ward off weight gain or other health problems. There is a LOT of vegan junk food out there, from candy bars to fried foods to uber-processed foods, many containing processed soy, which is frequently used as a protein substitute in vegetarian/vegan prepared foods and has been linked to cancer risk.

 

Apparently, employees do go home ... and eat meat or dairy, and the general feeling about that is "don't ask, don't tell." Ha! How crazy, huh?"

 

I agree there's plenty of vegan junk food available but I disagree with the soy issue AND I especially think it's nutty that someone thinks it sounds too difficult to eat one vegan meal a day - I mean assuming people there work regular hours. 

 

How often do we have to deal with meat in the workplace? Like people can't deal with no meat for once. I think it's a good policy that's notable at the very least for being outside the box. 

 

What do you think of a eat vegan or eat at home policy at work?


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