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  Topic Review (Newest First)
07-21-2019 04:50 PM
silva Here's a diet that's more than just theory- it's full of scientific research--

https://veganuary.com/starter-kit/dr...zen-checklist/
07-21-2019 01:51 PM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by David3 View Post
Nutolene sounds really good. It's sold by the California-based Loma Linda label, which has been selling vegetarian convenience foods since 1905: https://atlanticnaturalfoods.com/dim...inda-nutolene/

However, I think it's important to mention that your Nutolene fat-soluble vitamins advice is incorrect - Nutolene doesn't contain any fat-soluble vitamins. Nutolene's ingredients are water, peanuts, salt, added zinc, added iron, and added vitamin B12 (see link above). The peanuts themselves are rich in B vitamins, but contain none of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K: https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts...roducts/4361/2


.



I'm sorry - I messed up here. Peanuts do contain one of the fat-soluble vitamins: Vitamin E: https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts...roducts/4448/2 .


.
07-18-2019 07:30 PM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue_green_gold View Post
You might consider researching Ayurveda, the ancient natural medicine system from India. It is based on vegetarian eating and can easily be vegan. They place a huge emphasis on strengthening digestion and elimination as the basis of good health. There is a lot of specificity about how and what to cook and what herbs might help. Good luck to you!

The Ayurveda sattvic diet looks very healthy, but I can't find any nutrition evidence to support Ayurveda's discouragement of mushrooms, leeks, garlic, or onions: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sattvi...mpatible_foods . I think that this no garlic/onion/leeks/chives recommendation comes from the Buddhist/Hindu belief that these foods "arouse the passions": http://www.krishna.com/why-no-garlic-or-onions . I'm not qualified to make any comment on these religions.
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07-18-2019 07:03 PM
David3
Quote:
Originally Posted by IonSurfer View Post
I have a theoretical diet which might work. You could try the following:

Fruit: raw, 3+ times daily between dinners (vitamins, soluble fibre, some quick energy)

Nutelene: 2 cans daily (energy and protein staple, oils, fat-soluble vitamins; also has added iron, zinc and B12; not heavily processed like soy; easier on the digestive system than straight nuts)

Spinach: 2 times daily, boiled (calcium, some other minerals, some vitamins and fibre)

Salt: added to spinach (essential electrolyte)

Water: for hydration

Nutolene sounds really good. It's sold by the California-based Loma Linda label, which has been selling vegetarian convenience foods since 1905: https://atlanticnaturalfoods.com/dim...inda-nutolene/

However, I think it's important to mention that your Nutolene fat-soluble vitamins advice is incorrect - Nutolene doesn't contain any fat-soluble vitamins. Nutolene's ingredients are water, peanuts, salt, added zinc, added iron, and added vitamin B12 (see link above). The peanuts themselves are rich in B vitamins, but contain none of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K: https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts...roducts/4361/2

Spinach is certainly healthy, but it's not a good source of calcium. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (the world's largest association of Registered Dietitians) recommends that vegans obtain calcium from turnip greens, collard greens, kale, broccoli, calcium-set tofu, and/or calcium-fortified beverages: https://www.eatright.org/food/nutrit...or-vegetarians

The (vegan) Vegetarian Resource Group makes similar calcium recommendations: https://www.vrg.org/nutrition/calcium.php


Please remember that new vegetarians come to this forum looking for solid nutrition information. Your advice, while well-meaning, is incorrect. Please check your facts before posting.




.
07-17-2019 08:05 PM
IonSurfer I have a theoretical diet which might work. You could try the following:

Fruit: raw, 3+ times daily between dinners (vitamins, soluble fibre, some quick energy)

Nutelene: 2 cans daily (energy and protein staple, oils, fat-soluble vitamins; also has added iron, zinc and B12; not heavily processed like soy; easier on the digestive system than straight nuts)

Spinach: 2 times daily, boiled (calcium, some other minerals, some vitamins and fibre)

Salt: added to spinach (essential electrolyte)

Water: for hydration
07-12-2019 08:52 AM
blue_green_gold You might consider researching Ayurveda, the ancient natural medicine system from India. It is based on vegetarian eating and can easily be vegan. They place a huge emphasis on strengthening digestion and elimination as the basis of good health. There is a lot of specificity about how and what to cook and what herbs might help. Good luck to you!
07-04-2019 04:53 AM
salalas
The best vegan cookies.

I'm vegan and I really love it. Every holidays I make my favorite vegan oatmeal cookies. All my family wait my cookies every weekend. I found this great recipe in this website. Make this cookies and you will be satisfied.
01-26-2014 09:49 PM
kamizushi

It's best for the animals.

01-21-2014 10:50 PM
Veeko Hi there

I am a brand new vegan, but a long time bowel disease sufferer, so just sending my practical advice on dealing within an over active bowel. First, if you drink coffee, stop. It is massively irritating to the bowel. Second, the best thing I ever did for my bowel was to make and drink Kombucha tea, way better than any other probiotic. Third, eat high fibre, but smooth. Nut butter, not nuts. They can scratch the inflamed bowel wall. Simple stuff, ignore at will, but had to share, in case it helps. All the best.
08-25-2013 06:52 PM
Siv
Quote:
Originally Posted by jomojamaica View Post

I do believe however that many DESEASES and also CRIME, yes I said crime, I believe that excess meat eating actually makes a civilization more AGRESSIVE..... Less SENSITIVE, and over all increases moral decay and crime!

 

There is a yogic philosophy that classifies foods as sattvic, rajasic and tamasic (can be interpreted as balanced, stimulating and sedative). The idea is that sattvic foods are what you should be eating. Too much rajasic food makes you tend towards anger and violence and too much tamasic food dulls you senses and makes you lazy etc. No meat is considered sattvic. Chicken and fish is considered rajasic and red meat is considered tamasic.

 

Anyway, I'm no expert so a little google should give you more info but the idea seems to support your observations; fried chicken = aggression! It's worth noting though that there are some fruits and vegetables that are considered rajasic (apples, banana, corn, potato, cauliflower, broccoli, spinach) or tamasic (avocado, plum, mushroom, garlic, onion).

08-23-2013 09:54 PM
logic
Quote:
Originally Posted by unethicalvegan View Post

Is that all?  The only major source of calories in my diet that does not have substantial amounts of fiber is vino.
Everything I eat has fiber in it, but I make no effort to eat higher fiber foods. I find that with a mix of whole foods, my fiber intake ends up being between 80~100 grams and that is with consuming ~2500 calories.
08-21-2013 10:15 AM
luvourmother
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsunami View Post

There are just so many foods that must be regularly incorporated into ones diet to ensure the maximum benefits. Various food combinations as well as consistency is a key part of a plant base diet. Its important to also have enough water,exercise, rest, mediation and to keep proper ph and to maintain a healthy clean digestive track. This is a great example in and of itself... kumbuchu should be a daily part of a person who has a plant based diet as milk and soda to others.

combining is unnecessary.
08-20-2013 10:42 PM
jomojamaica I really feel, sigh, that humans... Sigh again, I sigh for all the blood spilled senselesly everryday just for people to eat

I DO NOT THINK humans have to eat meat, however, some might not be able to live without it

I was one of the BIGGEST meat eater, even though I always felt bad, I could barely if at all stomach preparing raw meat and cooking it, UGHH, gives me the jeebies just thinking about it, but I've come to realise the errors in my ways and cut out meat (which includes FISH AND ALL SEA FOOD) for about 5 years

Its sad that most people around me love meat UNAPOLOGETICALLY and I just can't picture how they can love their pet and still eat meat

But alas I was once the same, and we feed our dogs meat, so its a sticky situation

I do believe however that many DESEASES and also CRIME, yes I said crime, I believe that excess meat eating actually makes a civilization more AGRESSIVE..... Less SENSITIVE, and over all increases moral decay and crime!

Now I live in jamaica, where 99.99999 percent of people chow down on jerk chicken jerk pork and KFC everyday

And wallah, we have one of the highest murder rates, I don't know statistics, or have researched much

My post is basically just an opinion so take it with a grain of salt, thanks
08-20-2013 10:21 PM
unethicalvegan
Quote:
Originally Posted by logic View Post


I eat 80~100 grams of fiber a day and I don't have horrific gas,


Is that all?  The only major source of calories in my diet that does not have substantial amounts of fiber is vino.

 

Switching to a cold turkey diet of kale, beans, green juice, chia seeds, and goji berries is like a commitment ceremony with your toilet bowl. Newbie vegans who don't want to commit to this kind of quality time, should eat some fat, gloppy carbs, and concentrated protein (fake meat works but there are also feng shui alternatives). Absent pre-existing medical conditions, a few boca cutlets and half a bag of tater tots will help make you regular. I guarantee it.

08-20-2013 10:19 PM
weaselbritches Have you been tested for fructose malaborbance? One of my friends has it and really can't eat legumes without repercussions. There are also other food intolerances out there apart from gluten and they're not to one specific food. I have a mild salicylate intolerance which means I have to keep an eye on which fruit and veg I eat and how much of certain things. Salicylate is a natural chemical present in most of the fruit and veg we eat. It's supposed to protect the plant from disease and pests. Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH) in Sydney have a food intolerance elimination diet that looks at natural chemicals such as salicylates, glutamates and amines as well as preservatives and additives. There's actually a link for some people between amines and migraines too, so it's not just the gut that's affected. Anyways, this is the RPAH link if anyone is interested http://www.sswahs.nsw.gov.au/rpa/allergy/resources/foodintol/ffintro.html
08-20-2013 10:02 PM
unethicalvegan
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomebodyElse View Post




Since my notion of "everyone" actually includes EVERYONE ie. all my fellow sentient animals

 

I think you'd have a hard time convincing this fellow:

08-20-2013 06:37 PM
Tsunami There are just so many foods that must be regularly incorporated into ones diet to ensure the maximum benefits. Various food combinations as well as consistency is a key part of a plant base diet. Its important to also have enough water,exercise, rest, mediation and to keep proper ph and to maintain a healthy clean digestive track. This is a great example in and of itself... kumbuchu should be a daily part of a person who has a plant based diet as milk and soda to others.
03-25-2013 08:51 PM
logic
Quote:
Originally Posted by spinach View Post

I now have the most horrific gas every day.  I have explosive, watery bowel movements as well.  I am quite concerned about this.  And it all started with my change in diet.  I am going to speak to my Dr. about it.  I want to go vegan/vegetarian for the most part, and so this is upsetting for me and many levels.
You need to give your digestive system time to adjust, many things happen and they take time. For example, you'll start to develop different kinds of gut bacteria, your body will start to produce different enzymes, etc. Its also possible that you've introduced a food that just doesn't agree with you.

I eat 80~100 grams of fiber a day and I don't have horrific gas, yet when others eat my meals they usually get bloated and have gas. Now I make a conscious effort to reduce the fiber content when cooking for others!

When making changes in diet its best to take things slow, let your body slowly adjust. People like to go veg*n cold turkey, but its not always the best on your digestive system.
03-25-2013 02:53 PM
mariea

In my opinion no, it is not best for every single body out there.  If it were that easy there would be no controversy (this is just my opinion)  IBS is often times caused by muscle issues in the pelvic area. I know this because my pelvic muscles went into spasm and caused a whole pile of symptoms that were then misdiagnosed by doctors.  I was in physical therapy for years and all my therapists told me that  they successfully treat people with IBS all the time.  WHen the muscles tense up they slow the digestive process down which causes constipation (and pain) and then when they go everything goes too quickly which then causes diarrhea. Certain vegetables, grains, legumes etc may aggravate it, but don't cause it (in someone who only has muscle issues) This was probably the only symptom I didn't have with my muscle issues, but it was common knowledge with the therapists who do this type of specialty work that ibs is typically caused by muscle issues (and the dr's have a lack of knowledge in this) and is exacerbated by stress - because it is a muscle issue.  Hypnosis works well as it is very relaxing.  It's actually one of the best recognized treatments for ibs.  With that said, it is totally possible you have a food intolerance and all of your symptoms are caused by a certain food.  I guess in that case you have to do a true elimination diet. Many are sensitive to wheat and gluten, so it is always worth a try to eliminate for a while.  Blood work is important, but how you feel is equally important in my mind.  I'm vegetarian for many reasons, but I also feel good eating this way.  What's the point in eating a totally healthy diet if you feel like crap?  Hope you feel better and you should eat what feels right to you and what works well for your body.  If you have issues with animal products because of how they are treated, then maybe you could look for some humane animal products.  I buy my eggs from some friends who have 4 pet chickens who get to run around a huge yard and are treated as well as their cats and dogs.  I feel comfortable eating these.  Maybe it's not for you at all and you would prefer to stay vegan, but just wanted to throw the idea out there.  Hope you feel better soon.  Oh- a great book for ibs if you feel it is muscle related is Heal Pelvic Pain by Amy Stein.

03-24-2013 08:15 AM
spinach

I am rather concerned.  I have started eating a heavily plant based diet because of my concern about the ethical treatment of animals, and am leaning heavily towards veganism.  I have practically eliminated all dairy products as well.  It has been about 3-4 months since I drastically changed my diet.

 

I now have the most horrific gas every day.  I have explosive, watery bowel movements as well.  I am quite concerned about this.  And it all started with my change in diet.  I am going to speak to my Dr. about it.  I want to go vegan/vegetarian for the most part, and so this is upsetting for me and many levels.

 

But because of your question and the changes I have been experiencing, I wanted to reply to you query.

01-19-2011 03:38 AM
cassieVcorrell I'm so sorry you're not feeling well. I don't have any advice, as I am not a doctor. I just hope you find a solution that allows you to remain vegan.
01-18-2011 10:54 PM
nogardsram
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomasm View Post

I'm feeling much better now. I haven't been eating legumes much and my stomach is fine. I'll probably be okay and I feel like my "crisis" is coming to an end. I am no longer questioning my vegan lifestyle and that alone makes me feel much better. The last 2 weeks have been quite difficult for me, but if I have to look at the positive, I had the opportunity to examine very closely the reasons why I choose to be vegan. I was able to see different perspectives on vegan-ism and understand why some people feel that vegan-ism is wrong without immediately dismissing their viewpoints. Now I am more comfortable and confident with my decision to be vegan than I was when I first became vegan.

I'm glad to read that.
01-18-2011 05:51 PM
AKTF if you ask me, I think that some problems might be:
a) eating cruciferous vegetables (i.e. broccoli, cauliflower, kale, etc) raw. Cooking these vegetables will make them easier on the stomach.
b) Grains, especially wheat. Recent studies have shown that grain isn't as good for us as we thought, and we don't actually need as much as the food pyramid entails. Wheat is also a very common allergy - have you considered that maybe you have a gluten intolerance? You should definitely check for that
c) Raw nuts and seeds. They contain enzyme inhibitors, which will go away if you soak them. Otherwise, they cause a LOT of stomach pains. Same deal, as you may know, with legumes.

I hope this helps ^^
01-16-2011 03:13 PM
vegan_foodie
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomasm View Post

Thanks. I tried those 2 years ago. Went through two bottles actually. Still had trouble so I didn't bother to buy anymore. But since I have nothing to lose (except for $20) I bought another bottle. So I'll start taking them again before every meal. Previously I don't think I was taking more than 1 or 2 per day, so this time I'll take several.

If they didn't work for you, they didn't work for you. What I did was let the clerk know that I'm vegan and having problems with digestion and vomiting, and was interested in a digestive enzyme. Just so happened that the one she pointed me to worked, but if you try it again and take 2-3 pills before each meal and you find it doesn't help, just ask someone there. I'm sure posting a digestive enzyme thread on VB wouldn't hurt, either!


Quote:
I'm feeling much better now. I haven't been eating legumes much and my stomach is fine.

That's great to hear. Contrary to popular belief, legumes aren't needed in the diet.
01-16-2011 02:39 PM
mrsschu2u "Now I am more comfortable and confident with my decision to be vegan than I was when I first became vegan."

That's what matters! That and the fact that you are feeling better.
01-16-2011 12:07 AM
tomasm
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegan_foodie View Post

The enzyme I take:

Thanks. I tried those 2 years ago. Went through two bottles actually. Still had trouble so I didn't bother to buy anymore. But since I have nothing to lose (except for $20) I bought another bottle. So I'll start taking them again before every meal. Previously I don't think I was taking more than 1 or 2 per day, so this time I'll take several.

I'm feeling much better now. I haven't been eating legumes much and my stomach is fine. I'll probably be okay and I feel like my "crisis" is coming to an end. I am no longer questioning my vegan lifestyle and that alone makes me feel much better. The last 2 weeks have been quite difficult for me, but if I have to look at the positive, I had the opportunity to examine very closely the reasons why I choose to be vegan. I was able to see different perspectives on vegan-ism and understand why some people feel that vegan-ism is wrong without immediately dismissing their viewpoints. Now I am more comfortable and confident with my decision to be vegan than I was when I first became vegan.
01-14-2011 01:59 PM
vegan_foodie
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomasm View Post

You make a good point here, and I sometimes need to remind myself that I am at least as strong if not stronger now than I was as an omnivore. And yes I would like to know what digestive aids you use.

A lot of trouble happens when we also feel like we're not reaching our goals "fast enough." Strength is built over many years. Even the professional bodybuilders taking designer steroids, eating a perfect diet and exercising for hours a day still have been working out for at least a decade to look the way they do, and they're the guys with the good genetics (prone to muscle building)!

The enzyme I take:

I buy mine from Whole Foods but I'm sure you can get them online easily and they're pretty cheap, usually under 20 USD. You take them before a meal you feel will upset your stomach...they say to take it with the first bite but you can take it a minute or so prior. They are completely vegan and I find them to be effective. You can take one or two at a time, and again it depends on how you expect to respond to a meal based on your past experiences. For example, if a meal has gluten in it, I will take two because I know gluten and I don't always get along but is sometimes okay (if I feel bad to begin with, I just avoid gluten entirely). If you have a sensitive stomach and feel nauseated, you can try taking aloe vera juice (or gel, gel is better but is thick and tart...tastes like plain, unsweetened yogurt...I take the gel) with the pill. Aloe is great for coating and soothing your stomach, and you just need a gulp of it.



Quote:
Apparently many people recover their health after eating animal products again, but could they have the same results from an alternative solution? That's the big question.

The question is what happened to "recover" their health. If they were unhealthy/deficient, then it's because their diet was lacking, not because their diet was lacking meat. If you're not getting enough iron, for example, there's no reason to jump on the beef wagon when there are many, many iron-rich plant sources, you know?



Quote:
Originally Posted by SomebodyElse View Post

I'm not even sure people really understand what makes us ill either. Lots of people like to think diet has a lot to do with it, but I think genetic pre-dispositions are a big factor, along with how we deal with severe stress. I think animal foods are more likely to hinder the body's healing process than plant foods, and I think some plant foods can actually support the body while it heals. I am content to make myself a guinea pig and test my ideas on myself, because the alternative really isn't an alternative for me any longer, if it ever was.

It's always good to listen to your body because, as you know, everyone is different. Studies do show that a plant-based diet does encourage health more so than an omnivorous one, usually due to the inflammatory response we have.

You're also right about stress. I recently watched a National Geographic documentary on stress (it's on Netflix available via Instant Queue if anyone's interested) that shows we can actually measure the damage stress does to the body. The reason? When we are stressed, we send out two hormones: adrenaline and one I can't remember the name of (it's long and I think starts with Gugglio or Gluto). When the body receives that message (the hormones), it shuts down non-essential processes. Essential processes to responding to a stressful situation as a biological creature are increased oxygen to muscles (via faster breathing) and a faster heartbeat, among others. That's because biological organisms encountering stress encounter it in a life-or-death situation...but we have psychological stress (deadlines, kids crying, homework, job searches, etc.) and still respond in that same fashion. This shuts down stuff that isn't essential to survival, like ovulation, forming new memories, remembering old memories, your immune system and others. That's because a stressful situation should only last a few minutes: you run away from a lion, and when you're far enough away, you stop being stressed and your body goes back to normal. But now, we're constantly stressed. Wake up late, rush to work, battle traffic, your boss breathing down your neck, your co-workers suck, you think your spouse is losing interest (or you worry because you can't find a significant other), you didn't bring food to work so you have to battle lunch hour traffic to eat, you come back to work, you battle traffic on the way home, you worry about deadlines, you wonder what's for dinner, and then you just worry some more while you watch television or try to read a book or go online. If online, you're stressed yelling at someone or you read something in the news that upsets you...if you watch a movie that is suspenseful or scary, that can induce a stress response, too. Then you go to bed but you may not sleep right away, letting your mind worry and stress you further. The constant stress means those non-essential functions don't get a chance to work, so you do end up getting sicker, feeling tired (your body is amped up and primed to run at all hours, so you're just exhausted when you wake up), and everything else we're familiar with in our modern society.

We don't know everything, but we're slowly learning
01-13-2011 11:26 PM
SomebodyElse
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomasm View Post

Apparently many people recover their health after eating animal products again, but could they have the same results from an alternative solution? That's the big question.

No one, not even the smartest doctors, understands how the body heals. I've come to the conclusion that the less you do to interfere with the body's healing process, the better off you are. I do think a plant based diet is the best way to get out of the body's way while it heals, because plants do not give the body more to deal with on top of what is disrupting its health.

I'm not even sure people really understand what makes us ill either. Lots of people like to think diet has a lot to do with it, but I think genetic pre-dispositions are a big factor, along with how we deal with severe stress. I think animal foods are more likely to hinder the body's healing process than plant foods, and I think some plant foods can actually support the body while it heals. I am content to make myself a guinea pig and test my ideas on myself, because the alternative really isn't an alternative for me any longer, if it ever was.
01-13-2011 10:42 PM
tomasm
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegan_foodie View Post

Tomas, while there are a number of issues one could address, I wanted to address this. You must realize that your complaint of "years of daily training" not producing results is the complaint of many an omnivore. When I went vegan, I had no problems whatsoever maintaining my strength training regimen and continued to see the same results and actually retained my muscle mass better, so the diet in and of itself isn't causing you problems. Your problems are from your training regimen, food choices, overall calories, sleep amount, and genetics. If you want, you can shoot me a personal message and I can evaluate that for you...or you can post it here (but I think it would derail the thread).

You make a good point here, and I sometimes need to remind myself that I am at least as strong if not stronger now than I was as an omnivore. And yes I would like to know what digestive aids you use.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SomebodyElse View Post

It wouldn't matter, and I do not say that lightly. I've weathered elevated blood sugar, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, systemic candida, migraines, agonizing gall bladder attacks, and am currently dealing with a very perplexing fatigue disorder, all as a vegan. So while I can't - and wouldn't anyway - say that a plant based diet is a panacea, I will not consider adding animal foods to my diet. Plenty of people who do eat animals have the same problems I have struggled with, and end up on drugs or in surgery, and I have overcome everything, with the exception of the current problem, without drugs or surgery, and without adding animal foods to my diet.

What I am dealing with right now is supposed to be quite difficult to deal with on a plant based diet, and for a few moments today, as I drove past a neighbor who keeps her own chickens and sells the eggs, I wondered what it would be like to eat eggs again, if I really couldn't get over this problem without adding animal protein to my diet. But as I envisioned myself cooking and eating eggs again, the idea alone made me ill. Dairy is contraindicated, and there is no way I would be able to eat flesh, if I can't even stomach the idea of eating eggs. It is pretty much out of my hands at this point. I'd probably be just as likely to eat feces as eggs. I've been vegan way too long for anything else to ever be an option, even if it does mean I have a long hard road to recovery, or don't really recover at all.

Apparently many people recover their health after eating animal products again, but could they have the same results from an alternative solution? That's the big question.

Don't worry about eating eggs again because I can tell you from firsthand experience that it is a very unpleasant experience! I ate two more raw eggs this morning, and while I didn't have any problems eating them last week, now I feel like vomiting just thinking about it. I suppose I would need to eat them for a few weeks to know if eggs can make me feel better but it's not worth it.
01-13-2011 09:41 PM
SomebodyElse
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomasm View Post

What if you discovered that you absolutely had to eat an animal to maintain your health, meaning that your body was designed/evolved to be omnivorous/carnivorous? I'm sure some vegans won't even consider this question, or will say that they would rather risk their own health than kill animals. But I think this is a very important question to think about. Life feeds on life, we can't change that. (If someone can teach me how to photosynthesize I am all for it. Not joking.)

It wouldn't matter, and I do not say that lightly. I've weathered elevated blood sugar, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, systemic candida, migraines, agonizing gall bladder attacks, and am currently dealing with a very perplexing fatigue disorder, all as a vegan. So while I can't - and wouldn't anyway - say that a plant based diet is a panacea, I will not consider adding animal foods to my diet. Plenty of people who do eat animals have the same problems I have struggled with, and end up on drugs or in surgery, and I have overcome everything, with the exception of the current problem, without drugs or surgery, and without adding animal foods to my diet.

What I am dealing with right now is supposed to be quite difficult to deal with on a plant based diet, and for a few moments today, as I drove past a neighbor who keeps her own chickens and sells the eggs, I wondered what it would be like to eat eggs again, if I really couldn't get over this problem without adding animal protein to my diet. But as I envisioned myself cooking and eating eggs again, the idea alone made me ill. Dairy is contraindicated, and there is no way I would be able to eat flesh, if I can't even stomach the idea of eating eggs. It is pretty much out of my hands at this point. I'd probably be just as likely to eat feces as eggs. I've been vegan way too long for anything else to ever be an option, even if it does mean I have a long hard road to recovery, or don't really recover at all.
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