VeggieBoards - Reply to Topic
Thread: Amazing Animal Facts Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the VeggieBoards forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
06-12-2005 01:45 PM
GhostUser Hey, thanks soooooo much PortableKitten.



That's awesome information even though I hate testing on animals. It's so clear that fish have a fully fuctional nervous system and therefore feel pain. But hopefully "vegetarians" will stop eating fish knowing that they also experience fear.
06-11-2005 01:57 PM
GhostUser
Quote:
Originally Posted by goatee View Post

Hey, thanks for the info on chicken mating. I'm not sure if I totally get it but the picture is much clearer now.



Now if someone could do me another favor I would really appreciate it.



On May 11, 2005 the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) reported that researchers have discovered that Rainbow Trout can experience fear. My dialup connection doesn't afford me the greatest access to websites and I tried getting some info on said report but was unsuccessful. So if someone could search "Rainbow Trout, study, fear" and find that report and post it in here I would be so very happy.







Oh, I did get this far in my search:

Publications & Theses <http://www.aps.uoguelph.ca/aquacentre/aars/pubs-theses.html>





Found this:



Novel object test: examining nociception and fear in the rainbow trout.



Sneddon LU, Braithwaite VA, Gentle MJ.



Welfare Biology, Roslin Institute, Roslin, Midlothian, United Kingdom. [email protected]



This study aimed to assess fear responses to a novel object while experiencing a noxious event to determine whether nociception or fear will dominate attention in a fish in novel object testing paradigm. This experimentally tractable animal model was used to investigate (1) the degree of neophobia to a novel object while experiencing noxious stimulation, (2) the response of the fish after removing the fear-causing event by using a familiar object, and (3) the effects of removing the nociceptive response by morphine administration and examining the response to a novel object. Control animals displayed a classic fear response to the novel objects and spent most of their time moving away from this stimulus, as well as showing an increase in respiration rate when the novel object was presented. In contrast, noxiously stimulated animals spent most of their time in close proximity to the novel object and showed no additional increase in respiration rate to novel object presentation. There was evidence of a slight hypoalgesia in noxiously stimulated animals. The responses to familiar objects demonstrated that by familiarizing the animal with the object, fear was removed from the experiment. Both control and noxiously treated animals responded in similar ways to a novel object by spending the majority of their time in close proximity. Treatment with morphine reduced effects of noxious stimulation and appears to be an effective analgesic. After morphine administration, the acid-injected animals showed a neophobic response to a novel object and this was similar to the response of the control fish, with a similar amount of time spent moving away from the object and an increase in ventilation in response to the novel object. Morphine affected the fear response because both groups approached the novel object more quickly than the non-morphine controls. These results suggest that nociception captures the animal's attention with only a relatively small amount of attention directed at responding to the fear of the novel object.
06-11-2005 01:42 PM
GhostUser Hey, thanks for the info on chicken mating. I'm not sure if I totally get it but the picture is much clearer now.



Now if someone could do me another favor I would really appreciate it.



On May 11, 2005 the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) reported that researchers have discovered that Rainbow Trout can experience fear. My dialup connection doesn't afford me the greatest access to websites and I tried getting some info on said report but was unsuccessful. So if someone could search "Rainbow Trout, study, fear" and find that report and post it in here I would be so very happy.







Oh, I did get this far in my search:

Publications & Theses <http://www.aps.uoguelph.ca/aquacentre/aars/pubs-theses.html>
06-04-2005 03:07 PM
Thalia Yes. Birds basically have two all purpose holes with all the relevent apparati (sp?) inside. Something that puzzled me, too.



And according to this some birds have penises, but many do not.



ETA- I love The Parrot's Lament and The Octopus and the Orangutan by Eugene Linden. They are packed full of amazing animal stories.
06-04-2005 03:04 PM
GhostUser chickens organs are on the inside other than at breeding time. The male does climb onto the hens back and then lowers himself so their cloaca's are touching and mating takes place. Same as for any type of bird.

I used to have a few chickens for several years and read up on them.
06-04-2005 01:21 PM
GhostUser [QUOTE=Kelson]Oh god, I can see my reputation at VB forming now...





Does this mean you are not going to tell me how chickens mate? lol



Weird2twiggy tells a nice story of chickens but she won't reveal their mating secret either.



Ok, my amazing animals for this post are fast.

Information coming from my 1969 set of encyclopedias:



The cheetah is the fastest land animal hitting a top speed of 65 mph. Can you imagine driving on the highway at 55 mph and suddenly a cheetah decides to take of and actually passes you?



The ostrich at full speed can run 50t mph and the gazelle is right behind at 50 mph. A jack rabbit can actually top out at 45 mph which is the same speed as a race horse with a rider.



A greyhound (the dog, not the bus) can go 40 mph, an african elephant 25 mph and a human being 20 mph (but the fastest human is probably faster now with steroids, lol).
05-31-2005 10:11 AM
weird2twiggy I used to have a hen, and rooster. My parents had gotten them at an Easter sale thing. We had this wooden fence thing around our house, and the hen went to the neighbors yard through a little ditch underneath the fence. The rooster started crying almost, and my mother heard. She went outside and saw the situation. The rooster was too afraid to go into the ditch, but was calling someone for help, and my mom got on the ground, and , kind of, motioned the hen through the ditch again, she came through, and then they were safe.
05-31-2005 07:08 AM
Kelson
Quote:
Originally Posted by goatee View Post


So you can be the resident animal-sex expert, lol!!

Oh god, I can see my reputation at VB forming now...



Quote:
Anyway, my amazing animal for this post is actually two amazing critters working together. The ant and the aphid.



<snip>



ANTS ARE AMAZING!!!!!!!!

Yeah, wow....very interesting!
05-30-2005 11:27 PM
GhostUser Hey, that's an awesome post, Kelson!!!!!!!!



So you can be the resident animal-sex expert, lol!!



The one I never get is how birds mate. I mean I've seen roosters jump onto the back of a hen but I'm pretty sure her opening isn't in her back and his thingy can't be that long. But they work it out somehow.



Anyway, my amazing animal for this post is actually two amazing critters working together. The ant and the aphid. Aphids feed on plants by sucking juice from them. Ants have actually figured out that if they rub the back end of an aphid they (the aphids) will secrete a sweet kind of nectar from their mouths. The ants use this as a food and will move the aphids to other plants if the present plants are no longer healthy enough to support giving enough juice to the aphids. And the ants will protect the aphids from attackers.



I just want to know when the first ant dicovered that rubbing an aphid will give them a source of food and how did that ant tell the other ants how to do it.



ANTS ARE AMAZING!!!!!!!!
05-23-2005 02:09 PM
Kelson Oooooo! fun thread!



Here's some stuff as best I can remember it.



The left handed species you heard of was probably a type of frog. I read about them years ago. They clean out their stomachs if they ingest anything "unwanted" by spitting out their stomach and scraping it out with their left arm. Their left arm is slightly longer than their right arm. Thus, they are all left handed.



I also remember a fish that changed genders part-way through its life. When it did this, it also changed from a horizontal to vertical fish (not sure how to explain it....one eye slowly moved to the other side of its body and it now swam upright like a goldfish instead of flat like a manta ray).



There was another fish that swam in schools where there was only 1 male and the rest were female. When the male fish died, one of the females would change genders (and coloring) and would be able to reproduce as if male!



I watched a show on animals and sexual habits that was VERY interesting. I've since forgotten some of the nice facts, but here are a few:



When in heat, tigers mate up to 70 some odd times per day (ouch).



Some slugs are hermaphroditic and have sex with both sets of sex organs at the same time while mating with another slug.



There was a male wasp of some kind that would use deception to gain access to a nearby female it wanted to mate with. If another male wasp came along to mate with the female, this wasp would take on a submissive posture, tricking the other male into thinking it was female. It would allow the male to mate with him and then when the male was done and left, he would go back to trying to court the female!!



There were many more, but that's all I can remember for now.
05-22-2005 01:49 PM
GhostUser Right on Katt Fink!!!!



Posted by Mar leah in "In the News":



BERKSHIRE, England, May 22, 2005 If you could talk to the animals, would they have anything to say? New research suggests they might.



Testing the IQ of a sheep may seem laughable. But at the Babraham Institute in Cambridge, England, they know better. One sheep who got a reward every time she recognized a human face correctly on a video screen scored a perfect 50 out of 50.



"If it was a monkey, no one would have any problems, possibly even if it was a dog," said Keith Kendrick, a neurologist at Babraham. "They would say, 'Yeah, yeah, that's expected.' But a sheep, no one really believes."
05-21-2005 01:23 AM
Katt Fink I remember seeing on Mythbusters one time the dispelling of the myth that goldfish only have a 3-second memory. They proved it was false by training them to swim through a maze. Obviously, the fishies would have to remember what they learned the day before to advance any further through the maze. It took them a few days/weeks to catch on, but they eventually did it! Woo Goldfishies! See, just further proves that it's not ok to stick a smart & beautiful fish in a tiny cup and claim it "isn't cruel" because each swim around the bowl is like a "new adventure" for them
05-20-2005 11:52 PM
GhostUser Yay for the fox!!!!!
05-19-2005 07:27 PM
Good Populace My mom had a pet fox while growing up in Montana. She said that hed run around the neighborhood teasing dogs that were tied up. Hed figure out how long the chain/rope went, and hed sit right out of the dogs reach. Not a very nice fox, but certainly clever.

Her older brother wasnt nice to him, so hed do things like pee on his bed, and she says that hed actually make a sort of laughing sound when her brother got mad about it.
05-19-2005 03:49 PM
GhostUser Some species of earth worms in Australia can measure more than ten feet in length.



(I guess the worms' tape measures aren't long enough to measure 11 feet)
03-03-2004 05:33 PM
vegbunny83 lol. attacking a girl walking her pit bull... that is just too good. welcome btw.



Anyway, i finally managed to remember to bring that article to work, so here it is. it is out of an article in the Chicago News-Sun magazine USA Weekend (Feb 20-22 2004) that talks about animal intelligence. it talks about how smart dogs & cats, elephants, whales and chimps are, but the most interesting part was about a parrot...



"I know a parrot in New York called N'kisi (a Congo African Gray Parrot) who knows 971 words. He isn't counted as having a new word until he's used it at least 5 times in a proper context. In other words, if he just repeats a word, that doesn't count. Before I met N'kisi, his owner, Aimee, was showing him pictures of me and chimps. When I walked into the room, he asked, "Got a chimp?" Aimee broke a necklace, and he said, "What a pity. You broke your new, nice necklace." He uses grammar and initiates conversation (all skills once reserved for people). the bird even has a website [sheldrake.org/nkisi]. I don't think he's an exceptionallt brilliant parrot; I do think we're only starting to understand how smart they are."



(I believe this was quoted from Jane Goodall, as are all the stories in the article. )



julie
03-02-2004 05:19 PM
serendipity Hi everyone. This is my first post on here. Just signed up today. I love this thread! I live in Tennessee and there is an elephant sanctuary here. I watched a program about it on PBS. They got 2 elephants who had been in the circus together 20 years before being reunited at the sanctuary. They remembered each other and were pushing so hard to get to one another when they first saw each other that they bent the heavy, metal gate that was separating them and they had to immediately open it and let them be together. By the way, there is a wonderful website for the sanctuary.

http://www.elephants.com/



Just last week here a girl's dog saved her when a man tried to pull her into a van and kidnap her. Her pit bull bit him on the ankle and he fled. Duh! Of all things to try to kidnap a girl who's walking her pit bull!!!
02-27-2004 09:20 PM
vegbunny83 ooooh, i read a great article all about this in one of the Chicago Tribune magazines recently! i wish i had the magazine here with me because my computer at home is temporarily out of commission... i will bring it to work with me tomorrow and post some interesting tidbits. :P



julie
02-24-2004 11:53 PM
froggythefrog Okay, I don't know how "amazing" this is, but they showed a study on the news the other night, showing that dogs have different personalities, even within the same breed. Anyone who's owned more than one dog knows this. No??? I could tell my Border Collie instantly after he had been lost for 2 solid weeks: He was at a really nice house with two Aussie shepherds and a whole bunch of kids. He just looked at me like he was so proud of himself. (*sigh*) Yeah, that's my dog. "Tippy, I am really not sure you have learned your lesson, but I am taking you back home. This time, should the gate fall..."



Note: I was incredibly thankful that he was in such great care. Despite the "learn the lesson" comment, I would hate to think he would ever have to go a day without food, etc.
02-22-2004 01:28 AM
RGR
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeggiTash View Post

RGR, any runaway chickens yet?



No, I've been fortunate. One hen did wander off to explore the neighborhood, but she came back.
02-22-2004 01:08 AM
Skylark I thought this was pretty interesting: Cicada don't sleep for 13 years. The life stages for cicada are somewhat different than other insects. Pupa is replaced by something else--I forget what, but that is the stage in which cicada burrow in the ground for 13 years. Once they do that, they spend 4 years sleeping. Then they mate, reproduce, and die. I may have had the order wrong on the sleeping-then-mating part, but either way, they're a fascinating insect.



Some grad students did a project on cicada, and part of that involved digging up cicada and determining where in the 17-year-cycle they were. Apparently, those that were in their 13th year of sleepless burrowing skipped the four years of sleeping since they felt threatened. They went straight to mating and reproducing.



This may not be a good example of compassion, intelligence, or calculated strategy. I just think it's pretty cool. Granted, since I live in northern Ohio, when the cicada come out of the earth to mate every 17 years, they tend to not be as intrusive and obvious as in more southerly areas. It was also pointed out that not all cicada are on the same 17 year cycle. The student in my biology class who researced it said there are four main types of cicada, and each type has its own 17-year-cycle. That explains why I've seen cicadas more than twice in my lifetime.
02-21-2004 06:06 AM
VeggiTash Goatee asked me to post this:



Elephants perform greeting ceremonies when a member of the group returns after a long time away. The welcoming animals spin around, flap their ears and trumpet.



Hello Soybean81



RGR, any runaway chickens yet?
12-16-2003 02:04 PM
GhostUser I was being sarcastic at first but not against you, against a system that is so completely strange. The SPCA has no mandate to protect animals being raised for food unless there is really bad abuse. But who defines that?

So, no, you wouldn't be able to get any egg laying farm into trouble by calling the SPCA. I just wish it were the case. I was pointing out the irony, the very sad irony, of the whole situation.

So phone your local shelters and see if they need any chickens that need to be adopted. Hurry now, before RGR gets there. Good people, you and RGR, taking in the homeless chickens.
12-16-2003 10:05 AM
GhostUser
Quote:
Originally Posted by goatee View Post

arrrgggghhhhh.... I hate it when I can't tell if someone is being sarcastic because then I'm not sure if I can answer with sarcasm.



lol! i wasn't being sarcastic...sorry if it came across that way. but i really had no idea that spcas could do anything about it. since keeping animals that way does seem to be the "standard" when it comes to factory farming.
12-16-2003 01:40 AM
GhostUser
Quote:
Originally Posted by soybean81 View Post

seriously? wow...i didn't think the spca had the power to do that...since all factory farms are operated this way...definitely something to consider doing though...



arrrgggghhhhh.... I hate it when I can't tell if someone is being sarcastic because then I'm not sure if I can answer with sarcasm.
12-15-2003 06:41 PM
GhostUser
Quote:
Originally Posted by goatee View Post

And if that doesn't work (ie if that's not in your locale) I have an idea. Call your local SPCA and report the nearest egg laying farm. Tell the SPCA that the hens are kept 2 or 3 to a very small cage and have to be debeaked because they go insane in those horrible conditions and might peck at each other's eyes. Then they are packed up in a brutal manner and shipped off to the slaughterhouse.

Be prepared to adopt a few hundred hens. Or more.



seriously? wow...i didn't think the spca had the power to do that...since all factory farms are operated this way...definitely something to consider doing though...
12-15-2003 06:18 PM
GhostUser
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sola View Post

On animal planet on the 16th of december is a program called 50 animal facts, (I think along those lines). between 8 or 9pm. !



I hope someone will watch this show and tell me some great stories. I only have two channels and Animal Planet isn't on either.
12-13-2003 11:25 PM
chelseab2008 My older sister had a summer job. One day while on her lunch break outside a chipmunk was nearby. The chipmunks are nearly tame here and so she fed it a grape. My sister always ate lunch around the same time and the chipmuck was always there to eat whatever handouts were given. Once, although this may take away some of the cuteness the chipmuck has abtained, it chase away another chipmunk who was out to get some handouts and after the second chipmunk was gone it went back to my sister to get another grape.
12-13-2003 03:16 PM
GhostUser I love squirrels too. When I lived in Toronto I had a room at the back of the house. It over looked the small back yard but also some other back yards and a big dirt parking lot. There were lots of trees around and I loved watching the squirrels go racing around on the trees chasing each other. And they would taunt the cats too. They would slowly climb down the fence towards the cat as the cat sat there pretending it wasn't really interested. The squirrels knew exactly how close to get and then they would wait there as the cat got ready to pounce. But the squirrel would climb back up and then look at the cat again. And then go racing through the trees again.
12-13-2003 03:10 PM
GhostUser
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sola View Post

In Wood Green animal shelter in Godmanchester (UK) they are getting 22 chickens along with ducks and geese (I'm not sure if it's 22 chickens, duck and geese). They will all need rehoming. So if you want pet chickens and live nearby give 'em a call.



I would want to have some chickens (as well as my nan) but I havn't got the space or the money at the moment.



And if that doesn't work (ie if that's not in your locale) I have an idea. Call your local SPCA and report the nearest egg laying farm. Tell the SPCA that the hens are kept 2 or 3 to a very small cage and have to be debeaked because they go insane in those horrible conditions and might peck at each other's eyes. Then they are packed up in a brutal manner and shipped off to the slaughterhouse.

Be prepared to adopt a few hundred hens. Or more.
This thread has more than 30 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off