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  Topic Review (Newest First)
07-14-2009 07:11 PM
River
Quote:
Originally Posted by zirpkatze View Post

I haven't read this entire thread so ignore me if this has been said before. I think airlines should charge per pound, not per seat, including a per pound charge for any and all cargo you bring. Someone bringing 100 pounds onto an airplane is charged more per gallon of fuel than someone who brings 300 pounds.



O.O Perhaps per cubic foot would be better >.>

07-14-2009 05:44 PM
zirpkatze I haven't read this entire thread so ignore me if this has been said before. I think airlines should charge per pound, not per seat, including a per pound charge for any and all cargo you bring. Someone bringing 100 pounds onto an airplane is charged more per gallon of fuel than someone who brings 300 pounds.
07-14-2009 02:28 PM
Zephyria I haven't read all of the posts in this thread, but in my opinion, if you're taking up two seats, pay for two seats. Otherwise, it just isn't fair that someone else missed out on taking that flight.



I'm quite tall. I don't get a 2-for-1 deal when I buy jeans. I pay more because they use more material to make my clothing. That. Is. Life.
07-09-2009 05:49 AM
Mufflon I can imagine that it must be hard work to figure out how wide a door would exactly have to be to let people with a BMI of 29.99999 through but not a person with a BMI of 30.00001.
07-09-2009 05:38 AM
daffodil
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scythe View Post

Install smaller doors on the planes, that'll fix it.



lol that's funny
07-09-2009 02:32 AM
Catherine_vegan They should be supported to lose weight and helped to adress the things that caused them to be obese in the first place.
07-07-2009 09:54 PM
LuckyDuck
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry View Post

I can imagine it would be hard to lose weight of there were no grocery stores near me and (if I was an omni) I had to get most of my food from fast food restaurants: http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.co...aking-you-fat/



That's fascinating! I know I gain weight when I come back to my badly-zoned hometown, but when I live in mini-grocery-friendly Montreal, I lose a tonne.
07-07-2009 02:51 PM
Huckleberry I can imagine it would be hard to lose weight of there were no grocery stores near me and (if I was an omni) I had to get most of my food from fast food restaurants: http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.co...aking-you-fat/
07-07-2009 12:56 PM
LuckyDuck
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mufflon View Post

Oh, the jealousy!



How big is the pool?



It's a regular size for an in-ground backyard pool. It's got a shallow end, a deep end, and a diving board.



It's not mine though (I wish!!!)... it's my boyfriend's family's house, I just live with them in the summers.
07-07-2009 03:55 AM
Mufflon
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyDuck View Post

I'm very lucky, there's one in my backyard!

Oh, the jealousy!



How big is the pool?
07-07-2009 03:52 AM
Mufflon
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abbey View Post

Studies have shown that smokers have about a 5% rate of quitting for good. The rate tripled to 15% when study participants were offered money to quit.



I wonder how long that abstinence lasted.
07-06-2009 10:35 PM
veggiemeggie
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyDuck View Post

Unfortunately, so many of these studies are unreliable, due to the fact that they are often conducted by proponents of weight-loss gimmicks and fad diets and weight loss pills. They don't want us to believe it's something that can be done through sheer willpower. They want the consumer to feel helpless and overwhelmed, so that they'll shell out for anything to help them lose weight.



Then, when this expensive fad nonsense doesn't work, the person is left feeling even more helpless. Instead of saying, "Huh. Maybe that pill/diet/etc. was a load of ****," they think, "I really must be a lost case if not even [insert weight-loss gimmick here] didn't work for me!"



In many ways, the attitude towards weight loss is similar to the attitude towards diabetes. It's been proven, time and again, that diabetes is linked to lifestyle, and furthermore, that a simple change in diet and exercise can reliably eliminate Type II, and significantly improve Type I.



But nobody wants to believe it can be that easy, and simultaneously, that difficult. Nobody wants to give up the ice cream and the processed lunch-meat. Nobody wants to listen to that little voice inside that says, "I know I shouldn't be eating this..." because they don't want to give it up. And this defeatist attitude regarding weight loss is NOT helping. Obesity, heart disease, and diabetes are all on the rise. Moreover, they're all linked to one another. Add to this the fact that they're all reliably and credibly linked to lifestyle choices and you have a solution that is beautiful in its simplicity, but that nonetheless people don't want because it makes a bigger demand of them than popping a pill, or even taking a shot, wearing a pump, of undergoing surgery.



That, my dears, is sad.





I'm sorry, but cite? I have read many of these studies, most done by clinical health psychologists at various universities and research institutions.
07-06-2009 10:16 PM
danakscully64 I saw that lolcat today and knew exactly where I had to post it
07-06-2009 10:01 PM
LuckyDuck
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mufflon View Post

This stinks, doesn't it? I couldn't even swim for a while and even now I have to watch my movements and the way I push myself from the side of the pool. I don't go swimming very often though as the pool is a 20 km drive away.



I'm very lucky, there's one in my backyard!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Mufflon View Post

Word! I hate how some dieticians and/or physicians tell patients that they just have to cut back on this or that and everything will be fine and the patient thin and healthy and that there is really no "real cutting back" because all this low fat food tastes soooooo good. I say BS! Don't lie to your patients! Duh! The food does taste different and depending on how much weight loss is desired the patient will sooner or later have to eat smaller portions and will have to pick up an exercise regiment different from taking a 20 min walk a day. I would feel duped as well if someone would play that game with me.



I've had that game played with me before. It made me want to shake the doctor.



Then again, this is the same doctor who reliably mis-diagnosed pneumonia as the common cold, time after time. I really don't know why I expected him to be any better at nutrition and weight loss goals... I wound up doing the research and setting out on my own. Being told one thing after the other, following fad diet after fad diet and completing exercises designed to "target" my "problem areas"... argh! He had me on everything from Atkins (I've never felt that depressed and weighed-down... I thought I was gonna die!) to cottage cheese fasts.



Quote:
Originally Posted by danakscully64 View Post




That is AWESOME!!
07-06-2009 08:30 PM
Abbey
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eleven View Post

From the American Lung Association:



More than 45.7 million Americans have quit. Many of them tried several times before they were able to quit. They made it and quit for good.



http://www.lungusa.org/site/c.dvLUK9...ng_Smoking.htm



Studies have shown that smokers have about a 5% rate of quitting for good. The rate tripled to 15% when study participants were offered money to quit.
07-06-2009 04:46 PM
danakscully64
07-06-2009 08:26 AM
Mufflon
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyDuck View Post

Now, I can still swim and I can bike with a knee brace, even if I can no longer run without potentially re-injuring myself.

This stinks, doesn't it? I couldn't even swim for a while and even now I have to watch my movements and the way I push myself from the side of the pool. I don't go swimming very often though as the pool is a 20 km drive away.





Quote:
I wasn't trying to offend anyone. It's true, I do get a little frustrated, and for that I apologize.

Yes, me too sometimes. "Weight" is a very frustrating issue for too many people.





Quote:
And I also agree that doctors are pretty much never pleased, no matter how much you lose. They set short-term, attainable goals, but make it look like they're the final goal. That's a very unfair thing to do. It's like if I was a tutor for someone who didn't want to go to college, even though they needed to, and I made it look like all they had to do was finish a semester. Then, they finish the semester, and are looking for some approval and praise, and I tell them, "Good job! Now, go do it again."

Word! I hate how some dieticians and/or physicians tell patients that they just have to cut back on this or that and everything will be fine and the patient thin and healthy and that there is really no "real cutting back" because all this low fat food tastes soooooo good. I say BS! Don't lie to your patients! Duh! The food does taste different and depending on how much weight loss is desired the patient will sooner or later have to eat smaller portions and will have to pick up an exercise regiment different from taking a 20 min walk a day. I would feel duped as well if someone would play that game with me.



Quote:
They should be happy to attain their short-term goals, but they're unlikely to feel that way if they've been deceived into thinking, "Just lose this much weight, and they'll leave me alone!"

Yes, patients are proud they got their task done and then are told it was just one little step into the right direction.



I remember a physician saying that helping patients lose weight is very frustrating - for both the patient and the doctor because success rates are so low.
07-06-2009 07:43 AM
LuckyDuck
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mufflon View Post

I think more and more people believe it (look at the non-dieting movement), yet they're discouraged because as you said yourself: it's simple - but difficult.



Everyone who started an exercise regimen from scratch knows how difficult that can be. (I had a hard time starting exercising again after problems with my achilles tendon and still have to be careful so I can only imagine how hard it must be for someone who wasn't physically active for years and carries a lot of additional weight and might have pain in the knees and feet all the time because of it.)



It wasn't also that easy to change from omnivore to a plant based diet. Sure, it was simple (don't eat any animal products), but it wasn't easy and I still struggle.



I've had a tough time getting started with exercise again after my injury as well. I messed up my left ankle, and tore a ligament in my right knee. But it's all about finding the right exercise, and building a plan around it. For me, it started with seeing a physiotherapist and being assigned a series of isometric exercises to repair and build up the muscles around the injuries. I didn't feel like they were doing much at first, but after a while I started to feel a difference.



Now, I can still swim and I can bike with a knee brace, even if I can no longer run without potentially re-injuring myself. Mostly, while I was in recovery, I controlled my weight by monitoring what, and how much, I consumed. It's simple: the amount you eat should not exceed the amount you exercise. You need a basic amount to maintain a healthy weight, and the rest is a privilege earned by physical activity.



I've had a weight problem for a very long time, and it's been a lifelong struggle for me to stay at a weight that most "normal" people seem to attain without any trouble (between 150 and 170 pounds). In fact, it's considered overweight according to the BMI, but it seems to be my rock bottom. BMI wants me to be 120-130, but that's not showed up on the scale since I was 10 years old. Almost every woman in my family is overweight to some degree, and my mother is the most overweight of all. Compared to the rest of them, I'm a pixie, trust me.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Mufflon View Post

It is sad if people really give a damn for their health and rely 100% on modern medicin "to fix it". But it's also offensive for those who struggle and don't succeed. There seems to be also an all or nothing attitude and a lot of hypocrisy.



People want to be thin, not only less obese (understandably).



Medical professionals try to convince their patients since years that even a 10% weight loss is good - but when the patient manages to shed this amount of weight, a lot of pros are not satisfied with their patient's performance at all and want them to lose more (discouraging because the patient views his performance as not being good enough now and feels frustrated). A 300 lbs person losing 100 lbs will still have to face criticism despite the significant weight loss and lifestyle change.



IMO, that's very sad, too.



I wasn't trying to offend anyone. It's true, I do get a little frustrated, and for that I apologize. And I also agree that doctors are pretty much never pleased, no matter how much you lose. They set short-term, attainable goals, but make it look like they're the final goal. That's a very unfair thing to do. It's like if I was a tutor for someone who didn't want to go to college, even though they needed to, and I made it look like all they had to do was finish a semester. Then, they finish the semester, and are looking for some approval and praise, and I tell them, "Good job! Now, go do it again."



They should be happy to attain their short-term goals, but they're unlikely to feel that way if they've been deceived into thinking, "Just lose this much weight, and they'll leave me alone!"



07-06-2009 01:19 AM
mlp Very nicely said, Mufflon.
07-06-2009 01:07 AM
Mufflon
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyDuck View Post

But nobody wants to believe it can be that easy, and simultaneously, that difficult.

I think more and more people believe it (look at the non-dieting movement), yet they're discouraged because as you said yourself: it's simple - but difficult.



Everyone who started an exercise regimen from scratch knows how difficult that can be. (I had a hard time starting exercising again after problems with my achilles tendon and still have to be careful so I can only imagine how hard it must be for someone who wasn't physically active for years and carries a lot of additional weight and might have pain in the knees and feet all the time because of it.)



It wasn't also that easy to change from omnivore to a plant based diet. Sure, it was simple (don't eat any animal products), but it wasn't easy and I still struggle.



Quote:
That, my dears, is sad.

It is sad if people really give a damn for their health and rely 100% on modern medicin "to fix it". But it's also offensive for those who struggle and don't succeed. There seems to be also an all or nothing attitude and a lot of hypocrisy.



People want to be thin, not only less obese (understandably).



Medical professionals try to convince their patients since years that even a 10% weight loss is good - but when the patient manages to shed this amount of weight, a lot of pros are not satisfied with their patient's performance at all and want them to lose more (discouraging because the patient views his performance as not being good enough now and feels frustrated). A 300 lbs person losing 100 lbs will still have to face criticism despite the significant weight loss and lifestyle change.



IMO, that's very sad, too.
07-05-2009 02:10 PM
LuckyDuck
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mufflon View Post

As for the evidence regarding weight loss: it's already evident that only a few people can maintain even a small weight loss.



Unfortunately, so many of these studies are unreliable, due to the fact that they are often conducted by proponents of weight-loss gimmicks and fad diets and weight loss pills. They don't want us to believe it's something that can be done through sheer willpower. They want the consumer to feel helpless and overwhelmed, so that they'll shell out for anything to help them lose weight.



Then, when this expensive fad nonsense doesn't work, the person is left feeling even more helpless. Instead of saying, "Huh. Maybe that pill/diet/etc. was a load of ****," they think, "I really must be a lost case if not even [insert weight-loss gimmick here] didn't work for me!"



In many ways, the attitude towards weight loss is similar to the attitude towards diabetes. It's been proven, time and again, that diabetes is linked to lifestyle, and furthermore, that a simple change in diet and exercise can reliably eliminate Type II, and significantly improve Type I.



But nobody wants to believe it can be that easy, and simultaneously, that difficult. Nobody wants to give up the ice cream and the processed lunch-meat. Nobody wants to listen to that little voice inside that says, "I know I shouldn't be eating this..." because they don't want to give it up. And this defeatist attitude regarding weight loss is NOT helping. Obesity, heart disease, and diabetes are all on the rise. Moreover, they're all linked to one another. Add to this the fact that they're all reliably and credibly linked to lifestyle choices and you have a solution that is beautiful in its simplicity, but that nonetheless people don't want because it makes a bigger demand of them than popping a pill, or even taking a shot, wearing a pump, of undergoing surgery.



That, my dears, is sad.
07-05-2009 09:31 AM
Mufflon
Quote:
Originally Posted by unovegan View Post

it's work and people don't like to add on additional work in their lives. We're already feeling overwhelmed as it is. Sadly, at least in terms of exercise, it's a great stress reducer. I've found it hard for people who aren't used to exercising to start a regimen from scratch.

True. I know quite a few people who quit most of their physical activities when they graduated from university and started working. Of course they gained some weight and they find it very hard to go back to exercise again because all they want to do after a day of work is collapsing on the couch (and I can't really blame them as I went through such a phase myself).
07-05-2009 09:27 AM
Mufflon
Quote:
Originally Posted by unovegan View Post

In the US, many people fall for the gimmicky weight loss plans expecting for short term hardship and then it's all easy from there. That's silly.

Agreed. I don't know why people fall for this.



I don't think they necessarily fail because of a lack of exercise (well, maybe that too, but I think what you said in the sentence before is way more important).

Quote:
I've met many folk who'll diet short term and that's it.





Quote:
If you want to be healthy and in good shape, you have to work for it.

Agreed. However, I guess the problem here might be that some people have to put way more effort into staying trim (not even talking about getting trim) than others because of their genes. It's like some people have to work harder for their university degree or to learn a foreign language than others. Or to stay with exercise: some guys build up more muscles in a shorter amount of time than others with the same amount of weight lifting.



Staying thin is easier than first getting thin and staying thin. (At least this is what studies suggest.)
07-05-2009 09:18 AM
unovegan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mufflon View Post

And that raises the question why so many people aren't able to stick with this approach forever. Might it be that the effort isn't worth the benefit in the eyes of a lot of people?



it's work and people don't like to add on additional work in their lives. We're already feeling overwhelmed as it is. Sadly, at least in terms of exercise, it's a great stress reducer. I've found it hard for people who aren't used to exercising to start a regimen from scratch. Then again, the best things in life tend to not be easy.
07-05-2009 09:16 AM
unovegan
Quote:
Originally Posted by animallover7249 View Post

Noone said it was easy to lose weight and keep it off. A lot of people give up, sadly. It is possible, though, which seems obvious.

If you're heavy because of diet and lack of exercise, and you change both of those things, and never go back to bad ways....yeah you'll lose weight and keep it off.



agreed. In the US, many people fall for the gimmicky weight loss plans expecting for short term hardship and then it's all easy from there. That's silly. I've met many folk who'll diet short term and that's it. They yo-yo because they refuse to exercise which is weird to me. If you want to be healthy and in good shape, you have to work for it. If you break that habit and start exercising enough, it becomes a habit and much easier.
07-05-2009 09:13 AM
Mufflon
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eleven View Post

More than 45.7 million Americans have quit. Many of them tried several times before they were able to quit. They made it and quit for good.

In what amount of time and compared to how many who didn't succeed in the same amount of time?
07-05-2009 09:11 AM
Mufflon
Quote:
Originally Posted by animallover7249 View Post

If you're heavy because of diet and lack of exercise, and you change both of those things, and never go back to bad ways....yeah you'll lose weight and keep it off.

And that raises the question why so many people aren't able to stick with this approach forever. Might it be that the effort isn't worth the benefit in the eyes of a lot of people?
07-05-2009 08:57 AM
Eleven
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mufflon View Post


I think permanent weight loss falls into the category "simple, but not easy". Same with nicotine abstinence. Only a few who try succeed permanently.





From the American Lung Association:



More than 45.7 million Americans have quit. Many of them tried several times before they were able to quit. They made it and quit for good.



http://www.lungusa.org/site/c.dvLUK9...ng_Smoking.htm
07-05-2009 08:50 AM
GhostUser Noone said it was easy to lose weight and keep it off. A lot of people give up, sadly. It is possible, though, which seems obvious.

If you're heavy because of diet and lack of exercise, and you change both of those things, and never go back to bad ways....yeah you'll lose weight and keep it off.
07-05-2009 08:41 AM
Mufflon It was also pretty obvious for most people that earth was a flat disk. And later there was evidence that they were wrong all the time, right?



As for the evidence regarding weight loss: it's already evident that only a few people can maintain even a small weight loss. I don't know why so many people insist on their "it's so easy to lose weight and everyone is capable of doing it" attitude if evidence is available (think of all the research done on the subject of weight loss) that the opposite seems to be true. It's like still insisting that earth is flat despite every evidence available.



I think permanent weight loss falls into the category "simple, but not easy". Same with nicotine abstinence. Only a few who try succeed permanently.



Beatricious made an excellent post about what is so "obvious" a few pages before this one. Click me.
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