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  Topic Review (Newest First)
10-08-2008 08:13 PM
danakscully64
Quote:
Originally Posted by rabid_child View Post

I wish my cat's puke looked that good.



It's either exactly what they just ate (why don't they chew???) or a hairball, which resembles a hairy turd, or liquid and bile... which.. is usually rather clear and slimy and foamy and no fun to step in



Nice visual...



Quote:
Originally Posted by FafaFrappy View Post

Mmm, brains.



Very yummy brains!
10-08-2008 06:27 PM
FafaFrappy Mmm, brains.
10-08-2008 04:34 PM
rabid_child
Quote:
Originally Posted by danakscully64 View Post

Here's what baked seiten looks like before being put in the oven:






I wish my cat's puke looked that good.



It's either exactly what they just ate (why don't they chew???) or a hairball, which resembles a hairy turd, or liquid and bile... which.. is usually rather clear and slimy and foamy and no fun to step in
10-08-2008 10:09 AM
danakscully64 Here's what baked seiten looks like before being put in the oven:



10-02-2008 05:41 PM
rabid_child
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSI View Post

What confuses me is which dishes need boiled seitan and which ones need a log?



Personal preference. The texture is different in a baked seitan than a boiled one. I usually use the softer, boiled seitan for things like pot pies and soups and stews, and the firmer baked seitan for sandwiches, fajitas, and snacking.
10-02-2008 02:05 PM
Tofu-N-Sprouts
Quote:
Originally Posted by tprollo View Post

I was wondering if my wheat gluten is stale. Can it go stale? I bought it from a small health food store in a bulk bin and it kinda smells like stale flour but I know it is wheat gluten for sure because it is rubbery when mixed whit water.



Yes. Gluten flour, just like other flours, can go rancid or stale. It does take a long time, but depending on the length of time it had been in the bulk bins, as well as temperature and light, it's entirely possible your gluten flour was stale.

If it smells stale, it will pass on that flavor to whatever is cooked with it, I'd start over.



I use mine up pretty fast and get it packaged fresh, direct from the Bob's Red Mill factory store, but I still store mine in the freezer just to be sure.
10-02-2008 01:29 PM
vyapti
Quote:
Originally Posted by tprollo View Post

I tried the ribz and was not too impressed with them. That was a couple of months ago and the first and only time that I have tried seitan. But I did not follow the recipie exactly. I used VH garlic rib sauce instead of bbq sauce but I am not sure if that effected the taste too much or not. To me it tasted like stale bread with sweet sauce on it. But my daughter loved the ribz. I have been thinking of trying the recipie again with regular bbq sauce. I have also been thinking about trying other seitan recipies but havent gotten around to doing that yet. I kinda afraid too incase I dont like them either.

for ribz, it's all about the sauce, IMO, so make sure you use something that you like. I even mix bbq sauce into the dough when I make it. As far as texture goes, it took a little practicing for me to get it down.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tprollo View Post


I was wondering if my wheat gluten is stale. Can it go stale? I bought it from a small health food store in a bulk bin and it kinda smells like stale flour but I know it is wheat gluten for sure because it is rubbery when mixed whit water.

I'm guessing the wheat gluten is fine. I get mine out of the bulk bin at the grocery store. Do make sure that, when mixing the dough, that you use cold ingredients. No hot broth, for instance, or the gluten will begin to set before you even start cooking it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSI View Post

What confuses me is which dishes need boiled seitan and which ones need a log?

It has a lot to do with texture. Something baked or steamed is going to be firmer and more like processed meat, like sausage or salami. Something boiled will be moister and more closely resemble chunks of chicken.
10-02-2008 12:46 PM
PSI What confuses me is which dishes need boiled seitan and which ones need a log?
10-02-2008 12:13 PM
tprollo I tried the ribz and was not too impressed with them. That was a couple of months ago and the first and only time that I have tried seitan. But I did not follow the recipie exactly. I used VH garlic rib sauce instead of bbq sauce but I am not sure if that effected the taste too much or not. To me it tasted like stale bread with sweet sauce on it. But my daughter loved the ribz. I have been thinking of trying the recipie again with regular bbq sauce. I have also been thinking about trying other seitan recipies but havent gotten around to doing that yet. I kinda afraid too incase I dont like them either.I was wondering if my wheat gluten is stale. Can it go stale? I bought it from a small health food store in a bulk bin and it kinda smells like stale flour but I know it is wheat gluten for sure because it is rubbery when mixed whit water.
09-30-2008 11:26 PM
MrFalafel
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tofu-N-Sprouts View Post

Oh right. I seriously thought only vegetarian pioneer women from the 1800's used that method though. (Well, OK, not that, but I did think it was a completely outdated method that hadn't been used since the "invention" of convenient packages of vital wheat gluten...)



In some parts of the world vital wheat gluten powder is very hard to find. In the UK, there is only one place I know where to order it from, and thats an online flour factory that makes it themselves! When I first moved to the UK I had to go for the 1800s pioneering women method a couple of times and man was it hard work!



Go hug your easy-to-find boxes of vital wheat gluten powder and never take them for granted!
09-30-2008 10:16 PM
shineonyou
Quote:
Originally Posted by vyapti View Post

Yes, if you allow tempeh to pass your lips, you've messed up.



I guess I mess up a lot then.
09-30-2008 08:52 PM
Tofu-N-Sprouts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharon Picone View Post

the idea of making my own does not appeal to me...



Quote:
Originally Posted by rabid_child View Post

Homemade seitan is much tastier than store bought, and you benefit from having control over the taste, texture, and shape. I strongly recommend you give it a go if you're a seitan fan.



SERIOUSLY. I can't even imagine using store bought any more. That's like ... just... wrong.
09-30-2008 08:02 PM
truepeacenik hmmm.. I tried to make my own seitan once and it was very wet bread like (almost as if it had risen like bread dough. had that underdone quick bread texture, too.

tasted OK, so I knew i was on the right track.

Is there a high altitude trick, perhaps?



Now Watercourse and City O'City make awesome buffalo seitan.... I could live on that...
09-30-2008 06:29 PM
danakscully64 I don't think I have a picture, but I'll check my other computer. I made seitan chili one day that was AMAZING. I just threw some chopped seitan into my food processor to make the pieces smaller and added them in in place of tempeh (recipe was from Vegetarian Times).
09-30-2008 06:28 PM
danakscully64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toast View Post

Those dishes look great as well danakscully.



I should try seitan, but I think I was just so traumatised from my experience with tempeh that I couldn't summon up the courage to try another new thing after that.



Thanks! I should have added a description of what they were... from memory, lets see, I think from top to bottom: boiled seitan, carnitas, BBQ sandwich, boiled seitan sandwich, seitan log, seitan log sandwich.



Quote:
Originally Posted by vyapti View Post

Yes, if you allow tempeh to pass your lips, you've messed up.



Agree!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharon Picone View Post

I've ever only bought seitan from the health food store; the idea of making my own does not appeal to me (and I'm a self-taught chef!).



Seitan does look rather unappetizing before it's cooked, but trust me, once it is cooked (it's especially good in stews), it tastes really good and becomes extremely tender.



Don't give up on it so soon. Experiment with different methods of cooking (it's very versatile) as well as a variety of herbs or spices. Once you hit on a recipe or two that you like, you'll have seitan again and again. Guaranteed!



You should try my log recipe, it's REALLY easy, especially if you have a Kitchen Aid and very affordable.
09-30-2008 05:07 PM
rabid_child
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharon Picone View Post

I've ever only bought seitan from the health food store; the idea of making my own does not appeal to me (and I'm a self-taught chef!).



Seitan does look rather unappetizing before it's cooked, but trust me, once it is cooked (it's especially good in stews), it tastes really good and becomes extremely tender.



Don't give up on it so soon. Experiment with different methods of cooking (it's very versatile) as well as a variety of herbs or spices. Once you hit on a recipe or two that you like, you'll have seitan again and again. Guaranteed!



Homemade seitan is much tastier than store bought, and you benefit from having control over the taste, texture, and shape. I strongly recommend you give it a go if you're a seitan fan.
09-30-2008 03:28 PM
Sharon Picone I've ever only bought seitan from the health food store; the idea of making my own does not appeal to me (and I'm a self-taught chef!).



Seitan does look rather unappetizing before it's cooked, but trust me, once it is cooked (it's especially good in stews), it tastes really good and becomes extremely tender.



Don't give up on it so soon. Experiment with different methods of cooking (it's very versatile) as well as a variety of herbs or spices. Once you hit on a recipe or two that you like, you'll have seitan again and again. Guaranteed!
09-30-2008 02:00 PM
rabid_child
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toast View Post

Oh no I didn't mess it up, I just tasted it for the first time and thought it was absolutely disgusting!



Yea, it's pretty gross. I found a brand I didn't mind, then realized I got sick every time I ate it. I'll stick to my tofu and seitan and legumes and things.
09-30-2008 01:19 PM
vyapti
Quote:
Originally Posted by shineonyou View Post

Is it really possible to mess up tempeh? I can't wrap my brain around that one.



Yes, if you allow tempeh to pass your lips, you've messed up.
09-30-2008 01:03 PM
GhostUser
Quote:
Originally Posted by shineonyou View Post

Is it really possible to mess up tempeh? I can't wrap my brain around that one.



Oh no I didn't mess it up, I just tasted it for the first time and thought it was absolutely disgusting!
09-30-2008 12:50 PM
shineonyou
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toast View Post

Those dishes look great as well danakscully.



I should try seitan, but I think I was just so traumatised from my experience with tempeh that I couldn't summon up the courage to try another new thing after that.



Is it really possible to mess up tempeh? I can't wrap my brain around that one.
09-30-2008 12:42 PM
ViolinCyndee MMMMmmmm!! LOVE seitan!!
09-30-2008 10:57 AM
GhostUser Those dishes look great as well danakscully.



I should try seitan, but I think I was just so traumatised from my experience with tempeh that I couldn't summon up the courage to try another new thing after that.
09-30-2008 10:50 AM
danakscully64 I LOVE to make seitan dips (served with au jus sauce). Seriously, one of the best sandwiches ever. I miss real french dips
09-30-2008 10:45 AM
vyapti
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pixelle View Post

Seitan is very weird to me too, it's not really much like food IMO, although plenty of people on VB seem to like it well enough.



If you're particularly looking for a chicken nugget taste, I think you'd be better off looking in the Asian grocery stores for fake nuggets - so much better



Often times, fake meat in an asian store IS seitan, just commercially prepared. You can also get packaged seitan that, IMO works better than the processed Morningstar etc stuff, but not nearly as good as home made.



It really is worth it to spend some time working on one method 'till you get it right.



Dana: Those samiches are making me hungry
09-30-2008 10:29 AM
danakscully64 Here are some more pictures:



Boiled Seitan:























Baked Log:







09-30-2008 09:56 AM
GhostUser
Quote:
Originally Posted by vyapti View Post

and cooked (ribs and hot dog are both seitan)








That looks good.
09-30-2008 09:43 AM
Nishani
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSI View Post

So the piece that I boiled came out a little brainy, indeed. I chewed a little piece and it was very weird. But I focused really hard and I was sort of able to conjure up the texture of the chicken in McDonald's chicken nuggets..





Seitan is very weird to me too, it's not really much like food IMO, although plenty of people on VB seem to like it well enough.



If you're particularly looking for a chicken nugget taste, I think you'd be better off looking in the Asian grocery stores for fake nuggets - so much better
09-30-2008 09:32 AM
vyapti
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toast View Post

I have never tried seitan and now I'm not too keen to try it ever!



Don't be too quick to judge. Seitan really is good and amazingly versatile. Here it is uncooked:







and cooked (ribs and hot dog are both seitan)





09-30-2008 09:14 AM
Tofu-N-Sprouts
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrFalafel View Post

If you make seitan without 'vital wheat gluten powder' then it does use huge abounts of water. I've made seitan from scratch using nothing but strong flour and you need to knead and rinse all of the starch out. This takes buckets of water (and huge amounts of work).



So the first rule of seitan making is 'use wheat gluten powder'!



Oh right. I seriously thought only vegetarian pioneer women from the 1800's used that method though. (Well, OK, not that, but I did think it was a completely outdated method that hadn't been used since the "invention" of convenient packages of vital wheat gluten...)
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