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  Topic Review (Newest First)
06-08-2007 07:24 AM
inie I've never heard of that stuff but it sounds disgusting.
06-07-2007 10:20 PM
GhostUser
Quote:
Originally Posted by Margaux View Post

No, in the US you can't order even a glass of wine at dinner...arg

You can't buy it, you can't drink it until your 21.

If your parents were to order a glass of wine for you, there are some people who would report it. To me thats unbelievable.



This site says that's not true.





Quote:
The US is placed in parentheses because, while it is commonly believed that the minimum drinking age is 21, people can legally drink below that age under many different circumstances.



The National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984 required all states to raise their minimum purchase and public possession of alcohol age to 21. States that did not comply faced a reduction in highway funds under the Federal Highway Aid Act.... It does not prohibit persons under 21 (also called youth or minors) from drinking. The term "public possession" is strictly defined and does not apply to possession for the following:



An established religious purpose, when accompanied by a parent, spouse or legal guardian age 21 or older

Medical purposes when prescribed or administered by a licensed physician, pharmacist, dentist, nurse, hospital or medical institution

In private clubs or establishments

In the course of lawful employment by a duly licensed manufacturer, wholesaler or retailer



Quote:
Some States allow an exception for consumption when a family member consents and/or is present. States vary widely in terms of which relatives may consent or must be present for this exception to apply and in what circumstances the exception applies. Sometimes a reference is made simply to "family" or "family member" without further elaboration.



....



Some States allow an exception for consumption on private property. States vary in the extent of the private property exception which may extend to all private locations, private residences only, or in the home of a parent or guardian only. In some jurisdictions, the location exception is conditional on the presence and/or consent of the parent, legal guardian, or legal-age spouse.



Some States also allow exceptions for educational purposes (e.g., students in culinary schools), religious purposes (e.g., sacramental use of alcoholic beverages), or medical purposes. 2

06-07-2007 06:06 PM
Pirate Ferret would anyone else tip a whole load of this powder into vodka to make some kind of super-alchoholic drink? oooorrrr is it just me.



anyhoooo

i expect it wouldnt take long before powdered alcohol had the same legality as the regular liquid kind. i dont like the idea of kiddies being allowed to be legally drunk younger than 18. i think 18s a good legal age and anyone who wants to lower it is nuts.

i used to drink underage, but it was never hanging round street corners with a bottle of white lighting X(
06-07-2007 10:24 AM
GhostUser
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoodedclawjen View Post

the law in britain seems designed to slowly wean you onto alcohol... which makes a little sense to me. making it totally off limits, then suddenly liberally available, sounds a bit like a recipe for disaster- though you'd hope that by 21 people would be smart enough to be sensible with their poison of choice... in england many don't seem to be that way at 18.



yeah I dont remember really getting my head around sensible drinking until I was about 21 and I'd been drinking for three years by then . I think its just a maturity issue. I would often end up pretty pissed on a Fri and Sat night and I didnt even like alcohol that much.
06-07-2007 10:09 AM
Kenickie its 21 in the entire country of the United States.

and i don't think it's because it's "forbidden", that kids drink.

it's because they like being drunk.

and yeah in europe it's different, but in europe everything is different from the US.

i'm old enough to smoke cigarettes, die in war, vote, but not legally buy a beer from the liquor store around the corner. of course, this really doesn't matter, because as i sit here now, i can think of 3 liquor stores in my area that will sell alcohol to -21, and i have 21+ aged friends, so just buy having a n age limit isn't stopping kids from 'legally' getting alcohol. guys buy me alcohol at concerts all the time. but minor friendly alcohol was what caught my attention, the headline was so silly.
06-07-2007 09:23 AM
jeneticallymodified yeah, you can't buy booze for random kids in britain either, as much as the kids try and persuade you that you can - i used to work in a corner shop with an off-licence, and you'd not believe how many times i had to interveine and spoil the cunning plans of local teenagers hanging about outside the door with handfulls of change trying to get random adults to buy them booze (and cigarettes... and rent them adult movies) hehehe.



here an adult can buy alcohol for themselves, and let their child have a glass or two in their home, supervised, it seems.



Kids over the age of five can drink at home, but aren't allowed to buy alcohol. (i'd like to see a five year old try and lug a bottle of JD home).



When you're 16, you can drink beer, wine, cider or perry (not spirits) with a meal in a restaurant, or in the dining section of a pub - but only if it's bought for you buy an adult.



It's illegal for anyone under 18 to buy alcohol, and if they try to do so, or if an adult tries to buy it for them, both could be fined £1000. the store owner would get in big trouble too.



If police catch children with alcohol, they can confiscate it.



the law in britain seems designed to slowly wean you onto alcohol... which makes a little sense to me. making it totally off limits, then suddenly liberally available, sounds a bit like a recipe for disaster- though you'd hope that by 21 people would be smart enough to be sensible with their poison of choice... in england many don't seem to be that way at 18.
06-07-2007 08:14 AM
Joe
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoodedclawjen View Post

so in some parts of the states you can't legally DRINK till 21? or is it that you can't legally BUY alcohol? if its the latter... i'm ok with that.



I think it is in most of the country, because the US Congress has tied drinking age into whether a state is eligible for federal highway funds. If a state does not set it's drinking age at 21, then it does not get federal highway funds. Money talks--loudly. So, I think virtually every state has adopted age 21 (possibly Louisiana and maybe Alaska are exceptions).



As to your distinction between buying alcohol and drinking it, if you were walking down the street here in the US and a teen was standing outside a liquor store and the teen asked you to go in and buy alcohol for him, and you did this, then you could be charged with corrupting the morals of a minor or some other similar crime. So that is how they would make the drinking itself illegal in practice, even if the law technically allowed the teen to drink. (Otherwise, every liquor store would be thronged with teens standing outside with cash in their fists trying to accost adults to buy liquor for them.) If it were a parent giving the child alcohol, then they could possibly be charged with child abuse and the child could be taken away from the parents and put into a foster home.



Of course, many parents do allow children to drink wine, champagne or beer occasionally with meals. But they probably do not publicize doing this, nor call the police to brag about this practice.
06-07-2007 03:20 AM
Absolut What I think makes so much sense would be.. drinking age 18 (in bars, pubs, restuarants etc) but age to buy bottles/cans from stores 20.



They put the drinking age from 20 to 18 here a few years ago.. and now are always all OMG WE HAVE TO PUT IT BACK UP.. because of the increase in under 18 year old people drinking.. but frick that would solve everything.



21 is absolutely ridiculous though.
06-06-2007 10:27 PM
Nishani
Quote:
Originally Posted by Starblossom View Post

I don't know how you americans can wait until 21. I thought 19 was ridiculous here! Young people only drink so much beer because it's forbidden.



That's not strictly true. Binge drinking still goes on amongst people who are of legal age.
06-06-2007 09:29 PM
Margaux No, in the US you can't order even a glass of wine at dinner...arg

You can't buy it, you can't drink it until your 21.

If your parents were to order a glass of wine for you, there are some people who would report it. To me thats unbelievable.
06-06-2007 08:33 PM
jeneticallymodified so in some parts of the states you can't legally DRINK till 21? or is it that you can't legally BUY alcohol? if its the latter... i'm ok with that. the former seems a bit excessive- if we're talking about a sip or a glass here and there, at least.



i think its one thing for young people to be able to drink alcohol (like, a glass with a meal- like over 16's can get in a bar in england, or a toast at a family dinner, etc), but another entirely for them to be able to buy it themselves. in britain you can drink alcohol in your own home at any age above 5... but the hope (i know it often doesn't work that way in practice) is that if someone else (an adult) pays for it and supplies it to minors in their care, there is some kind of supervision and responsibility in place.



i personally think this powdered alcohol thing is a nightmare waiting to happen, at least if it gets to britain and remains unregulated... though i can't see that happening for long, if at all. maybe dutch teenagers are more sensible when it comes to booze than many british ones seem to be.



its bad enough in the uk currently with the number of 11 to 17 year olds currently getting hammered on 2 litres of mysteriously aquired cider every weekend... but oh boy, if they could legally buy and sprinkle alcohol powder into water to make their own.... yeah... they'd totally under dilute it. i can see superbrews in the making... oooh ooooh, and some little genuises snorting it.



yeeeeeaaaahh... great idea.
06-06-2007 08:29 PM
Margaux Yeah, I think that teenagers in the US drink so much because it is so forbiden. It makes it appealing to defy it, and of course peer pressure.
06-06-2007 07:48 PM
Chrysalis I don't know how you americans can wait until 21. I thought 19 was ridiculous here! Young people only drink so much beer because it's forbidden.
06-06-2007 01:20 PM
Brandon The alcohol content of that "youth friendly" powder is about the same as the alcohol content of Oklahoma beer.



(OK beer is 3.2% alcohol )
06-06-2007 01:16 PM
troub move the smoking and minimum age to join the military to 21 and they will be the same, viola!
06-06-2007 01:08 PM
Margaux
Quote:
Originally Posted by rabid_child View Post

I also learned you can't buy non-alcoholic beer when you're 20. I tried. My dad sent me to the store when he was having a BBQ one summer with a list -- including non-alcoholic beer. I couldn't buy it. I was also buying vanilla extract and I asked if I was allowed to purchase that. They were confused. I explained that the alcohol by volume in the vanilla was higher than the beer. They didn't get it. I left without the "beer"



I think it makes more sense not to sell wine "to cook a dish with" because it's easy enough to say "Oh yea, I'm making a reduction sauce" and then drink the bottle. Would take more nonalcoholic beer than one could physically consume to get a buzz off of it.



That nonalcoholic beer story is ridiculous....like you said, to get a buzz off of it would be impossible. I'm sure people would use that sauce excuse for the wine.



Its just sad that some people can't even have a glass of wine on their wedding night. At 18 you can go to war and die for your country but you can't have a beer.
06-06-2007 12:58 PM
rabid_child
Quote:
Originally Posted by Margaux View Post

In France teenagers can smoke and by alcohol, I'm not sure if there is an age but its not strict like the US.



Its kind of ridiculous that someone who is 20 can't even buy wine even if it is to cook a dish with.



I also learned you can't buy non-alcoholic beer when you're 20. I tried. My dad sent me to the store when he was having a BBQ one summer with a list -- including non-alcoholic beer. I couldn't buy it. I was also buying vanilla extract and I asked if I was allowed to purchase that. They were confused. I explained that the alcohol by volume in the vanilla was higher than the beer. They didn't get it. I left without the "beer"



I think it makes more sense not to sell wine "to cook a dish with" because it's easy enough to say "Oh yea, I'm making a reduction sauce" and then drink the bottle. Would take more nonalcoholic beer than one could physically consume to get a buzz off of it.
06-06-2007 12:52 PM
Margaux In France teenagers can smoke and by alcohol, I'm not sure if there is an age but its not strict like the US.



Its kind of ridiculous that someone who is 20 can't even buy wine even if it is to cook a dish with.
06-06-2007 12:48 PM
troub /facepalm
06-06-2007 11:31 AM
Eclipse Children drink alcohol in Germany ( says my mom) and it's not a big deal.
06-06-2007 09:46 AM
Kenickie article



Quote:
AMSTERDAM -

The latest innovation in inebriation, called Booz2Go, is available in 20-gramme packets that cost 1-1.5 euros (70 pence-1 pound).



Top it up with water and you have a bubbly, lime-coloured and -flavoured drink with just 3 percent alcohol content.



"We are aiming for the youth market. They are really more into it because you can compare it with Bacardi-mixed drinks," 20-year-old Harm van Elderen told Reuters.



"Because the alcohol is not in liquid form, we can sell it to people below 16," said project member Martyn van Nierop.



The legal age for drinking alcohol and smoking is 16 in the Netherlands.


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