VeggieBoards - Reply to Topic
Thread: mould..true or false? Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the VeggieBoards forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
10-20-2006 08:28 AM
Lothar M Kirsch Aimra thanks for that important point. Peanut plants grow over the soil, but the peanuts develop underground and so they might grow moulds easier than other nuts. But other nuts could also grow moulds if being stored in a humid environment.
10-19-2006 11:29 AM
Aimra Peanuts (and I'm assuming other nuts) can grow mold easily that is harmful as Lothar pointed out. I only know this because of my parrots who get peanuts as treats sometimes. A moldy peanut given to a parrot will kill it! (Then again I'm convinced that everything kills birds!)



You should try to get roasted nuts (unless you are familiar with the supplier of course) to prevent yourself from getting moldy nuts.
10-19-2006 11:21 AM
nigel Thanks! I'll steer clear. My liver probably sees enough abuse as it is.
10-19-2006 09:20 AM
Lothar M Kirsch Moulds might develop toxins which may harm the liver. There are reports of fatal liver failure after eating certain moulds (I remember one case report after eating a bag of pistacchios with mould - which must be a rare incident as it tastes bad).

Sometimes if I haven't inspected my bread carefully I can taste the mould and would spit it out immediately.
10-18-2006 08:46 PM
Kiz I'm another who just cuts off the mould and eats the rest. I make an exception for bread because, as others have pointed out, the mould goes right through the bread. It's not really an issue for me, I tend to freeze excess bread before it starts to turn.
10-18-2006 08:41 PM
nigel Lothar - I'm curious (if it can be explained simply). What's bad about mold? What does it do to a person?
10-18-2006 07:53 PM
Tofu-N-Sprouts Yeah, good point about bread. Actually bread with a mold spot tastes moldy to me even if the spot is removed, it's one item I do NOT "pick the mold off".



Though around here, we go through bread so quickly, I haven't seen a moldy piece in ages.
10-18-2006 10:40 AM
catswym
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lothar M Kirsch View Post

There are moulds and moulds ...

I definitely advise discarding any bread with mould. Same applies to cheese if it isn't the case you packed camenbert and hard cheese together.

Sometimes the tio of a jar of selfmade jam might have some mould and it would be OK to discard the top inch ans use the rest.

The reason is: in bread the mould spreads without you being able to see it. Jam might have some fluid on top with a concentration of sugar that still allows mould to develop but deeper in the jam the sugar concentration is too high for mould spore to survive and hence to develop.



agreed. if you see a spot of mold on the bread the mold has already infiltrated the whole of the bread and that is just the most dense outcropping.
10-18-2006 08:44 AM
Lothar M Kirsch There are moulds and moulds ...

I definitely advise discarding any bread with mould. Same applies to cheese if it isn't the case you packed camenbert and hard cheese together.

Sometimes the tio of a jar of selfmade jam might have some mould and it would be OK to discard the top inch ans use the rest.

The reason is: in bread the mould spreads without you being able to see it. Jam might have some fluid on top with a concentration of sugar that still allows mould to develop but deeper in the jam the sugar concentration is too high for mould spore to survive and hence to develop.
10-17-2006 02:19 PM
taurushead ahah. how interesting. and yeah i haven't gotten sick yet. but it might not be ideal? oh well. ill just use my best judgement really good to know all this though, you guys are wisdom INCARNATE!! xo
10-17-2006 01:27 PM
DieselAmy If I only see it on the bread crust in one spot, I totally remove that part and eat the rest.



Ever eat a big moldy area accidentally though? Yuck!
10-16-2006 07:50 PM
Tofu-N-Sprouts I'm definitely in the "just cut it off and eat the rest" group. Good greif, what a waste of food. Some people might be able to afford that, but I sure ca't!

Molds on food will not make you sick.

True, we don't always think they look pretty, and I'm not going to eat a big ol' CHUNK of mold, but they won't make you sick.
10-16-2006 07:25 PM
froggythefrog
Quote:
Originally Posted by taurushead View Post

"mould is the tip of the iceberg. even if you cut a mouldy corner off something, or peel the outside of a sweetpotato with spots of mould on it and the inside LOOKS and TASTES fine...it shouldn't be eaten."



?



True... But not all molds will make you sick.
10-16-2006 06:30 PM
nigel I eat moldy bread all the time. No problems.
10-16-2006 05:08 PM
karenlovessnow Whew! I used to cut the mold off of cheese all the time back in the day when I ate cheese!
10-16-2006 08:36 AM
Ayrlin Bah I just cut the mold off and have my whole life.

I'm not dead yet or sick come to think of it, remeber our first antibiotics came from mold
10-16-2006 08:12 AM
GhostUser me too. ^^^^
10-16-2006 08:09 AM
cookingVeg I routinely cut mould off of fruits, vegetables, cheese, etc. and I've never gotten sick from it.
10-16-2006 03:08 AM
taurushead oh wow?! how interesting i had no idea there were classifications with cutting off mould glad i asked!! and i dont feel sick...yet...



i just hate wasting things coz of a few weird spots.

so i wondered if it was worth it or not.



oh vb, you know sooo much
10-16-2006 02:03 AM
Irizary A sweet potato is a hard vegetable, so I think you should be able to cut off a small amount of mold...



Quote:
Fruits and vegetables, firm (such as cabbage, bell peppers, carrots, etc.)...



Small mold spots can be cut off fruits and vegetables with low moisture content. It’s difficult for mold to penetrate dense foods.

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets...Food/index.asp
10-16-2006 01:57 AM
kpickell If there's visible mold, then there's definetely mold in the rest of the product that's too small/sparse to be seen yet. It builds gradually to the point that it becomes visible. It might not be enough to get sick from though, it just depends. But yeah, if there's mold, throw it out.
10-16-2006 01:33 AM
taurushead really?! you'd get sick if you just cut off the mouldy bits?!?!



wow. i didn't realise. i was brought up doing that all the time so we didn't waste good food, coz it seemed good on the inside.

i just ate a potato that had some (not much) mould on the outside on one half, after cutting that bit off?
10-16-2006 01:27 AM
kpickell true.
10-16-2006 12:55 AM
taurushead "mould is the tip of the iceberg. even if you cut a mouldy corner off something, or peel the outside of a sweetpotato with spots of mould on it and the inside LOOKS and TASTES fine...it shouldn't be eaten."



?

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off