career choices and effective activism - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 08-02-2012, 06:49 PM
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I just found this interesting piece: Choosing a Conventional Career to Help Animals  It's about career choices and effective activism.


"If you want to maximize your positive impact on animals’ lives, you should consider pursuing a high-earning career. Most people can do more good indirectly (by earning money and donating it) than directly (by becoming full-time activists). ..."

 

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#2 Old 08-02-2012, 08:13 PM
 
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LOL that doesn't surprise me at all.

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#3 Old 08-02-2012, 10:33 PM
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Trouble is, becoming the kind of person who earns lots of money often results in becoming the kind of person who doesn't want to donate much of it.
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#4 Old 08-03-2012, 12:53 AM
 
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Trouble is, becoming the kind of person who earns lots of money often results in becoming the kind of person who doesn't want to donate much of it.

 

That seems to happen to the best of people. Great point.

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#5 Old 09-27-2012, 12:27 PM
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Trouble is, becoming the kind of person who earns lots of money often results in becoming the kind of person who doesn't want to donate much of it.

Really? How so? Do you have real examples or is this just your conjecture based on prejudice?

Sergey Brin who invented Google pledged$ 500,000,000  (yes I have the right number of zeros) to Parkinsons research already almost $200,000,000  have been spent.George Soros has spent 12 times this amount on projects encouraging democracy.

This is the also-ran level

 

Li Kashing has donated 10,000,000,000 to various causes

Bill gates almos triples that for various projects including his personal deciion to eradicate malaria worldwide

Warren Buffet beats even Gates spending on poverty relief and healthcare in teh very poorest countries. he has donated over 30,000,000,000

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#6 Old 08-22-2013, 04:29 PM
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This is another good essay on the topic:

 

Why Activists Should Consider Making Lots of Money

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#7 Old 08-22-2013, 05:46 PM
 
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Once you hit a certain amount of wealth (say if you're making more than $500,000 a year) and are sufficiently 'above' the rat race, it becomes a lot easier to part with your money in my opinion. Otherwise, you continue to worry about things like financial security and sending your kids to a good college. If I knew that I'd be able to make this kind of money I'd probably choose the conventional route, but unfortunately these jobs tend to be make it or break it - either you get lucky or you don't.

Even if you go to a good college and are an exceptional individual, I think it's more likely that you'll end up in a job that makes maybe $80,000 to $200,000 a year. If you're working long, miserable hours to make this kind of money, you'd probably want to spend it on tangible comforts to make yourself feel better, especially if that's what all your colleagues are doing.

I think it'd be incredibly noble if you're upper middle class and willing to live a frugal life to donate half your salary to charity, and I'd be full of admiration for someone like that. But most humans don't have that kind of mental fortitude, and if you're passionate about nonprofit work, donating money isn't as fulfilling as being directly involved. You won't be as happy, and you won't be as likely to keep it up.

Then again, I admit that I have zero experience in this sort of thing, and all this is just my hypothetical musing. Feel free to call out my BS.

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#8 Old 08-22-2013, 06:37 PM
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I think it'd be incredibly noble if you're upper middle class and willing to live a frugal life to donate half your salary to charity, and I'd be full of admiration for someone like that. But most humans don't have that kind of mental fortitude, and if you're passionate about nonprofit work, donating money isn't as fulfilling as being directly involved. You won't be as happy, and you won't be as likely to keep it up.

Then again, I admit that I have zero experience in this sort of thing, and all this is just my hypothetical musing. Feel free to call out my BS.

You're right. I'd feel better getting out there and being more active and I will, once I pass my driver's test @[email protected] But right now I've just donated money around. The organizations still can make good use of it.


"Why should man expect his prayer for mercy to be heard by What is above him when he shows no mercy to what is under him?" ~Pierre Troubetzkoy
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#9 Old 08-30-2013, 12:11 AM
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Once you hit a certain amount of wealth (say if you're making more than $500,000 a year) and are sufficiently 'above' the rat race, it becomes a lot easier to part with your money in my opinion. Otherwise, you continue to worry about things like financial security and sending your kids to a good college. If I knew that I'd be able to make this kind of money I'd probably choose the conventional route, but unfortunately these jobs tend to be make it or break it - either you get lucky or you don't.

Even if you go to a good college and are an exceptional individual, I think it's more likely that you'll end up in a job that makes maybe $80,000 to $200,000 a year. If you're working long, miserable hours to make this kind of money, you'd probably want to spend it on tangible comforts to make yourself feel better, especially if that's what all your colleagues are doing.

I think it'd be incredibly noble if you're upper middle class and willing to live a frugal life to donate half your salary to charity, and I'd be full of admiration for someone like that. But most humans don't have that kind of mental fortitude, and if you're passionate about nonprofit work, donating money isn't as fulfilling as being directly involved. You won't be as happy, and you won't be as likely to keep it up.

Then again, I admit that I have zero experience in this sort of thing, and all this is just my hypothetical musing. Feel free to call out my BS.

Are you talking singapore or US dollars?

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#10 Old 08-30-2013, 03:07 AM
 
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Are you talking singapore or US dollars?

 

I don't think the difference in exchange rate is THAT great, but I'm basing this off my knowledge of the salaries of people around me. Also, the exact numbers are not important.


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#11 Old 08-30-2013, 09:32 AM
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I think it'd be incredibly noble if you're upper middle class and willing to live a frugal life to donate half your salary to charity, and I'd be full of admiration for someone like that. But most humans don't have that kind of mental fortitude

I agree to a point. I think that very few people are able to have both the drive to earn at high levels and the drive to donate large amounts of that money to charity. It's easy to say that if you had $X that you'd donate 50% of X to charity, but to actually do that is another thing. Other issues may seem more immediately important: getting yourself and loved ones out of debt, saving for retirement, saving for your children's college, paying private school tuition, owning a nice home and car, traveling, etc etc.

 

The other thing is, too, that for most of us making lots of money takes a LOT of effort. I'm no good at it at all. It would require a TOTAL shift in my personality. I just can't do it. However, my husband is pretty good at it. And I'm OK at getting him to part with it so we can make a good team. However, when it comes to how we spend our money, we're both more interested in things like sending our son to a good private school than putting him in public school and donating that $10k a year to Vegan Outreach.

 

Now that I'm here I could say I'm willing to not adopt another child and instead donate $10k/ year to charity. But will it happen? I don't know. I think it will only happen if the charity is my own - the one I run where I have say over how the money gets spent. I'm sharing this because I think that happens quite a bit. Many wealthy philanthropists start their own charities/foundations and the bulk of their donations go to their own nonprofit organizations.

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#12 Old 08-30-2013, 10:12 AM
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I don't think the difference in exchange rate is THAT great, but I'm basing this off my knowledge of the salaries of people around me. Also, the exact numbers are not important.

Youi make a good point. Saying that Living earning 200K singaporean and living of half that is not exactly penury, it would be a good wage in the UK and Singpore is al lot cheaper than the UK

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#13 Old 08-30-2013, 10:40 AM
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Optimal goal: high paying activist career ;-)

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#14 Old 08-30-2013, 10:45 AM
 
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Optimal goal: high paying activist career ;-)

 

That's an even more distant romantic dream than climbing the corporate ladder lol :rolleyes:


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#15 Old 08-30-2013, 11:04 AM
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That's an even more distant romantic dream than climbing the corporate ladder lol rolleyes.gif

Not really, environmental and animal lawyers rake in nice cash.

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#16 Old 08-30-2013, 10:57 PM
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When we go door to door collecting funds for public action, there are some neighborhoods in which most residents give a small amount and that's the way team members have to reach their daily goal, and then there are other neighborhoods in which most give nothing except criticism, but we make the goal because the few who do support the cause from those neighborhoods each donate large amounts.  Perhaps that sounds prejudicial, but it is a fairly consistent experience in different canvassing organizations around here.


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