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#1 Old 09-15-2008, 01:36 PM
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A friend continue to tell me I should stock up on storable food (I don't disagree, but I'm neglecting it, cause I feel like I would have to compromise for crap to get storable food)



Does anyone know if anyone makes Vegan MRE's or other storable foods?



What are you other vegans planning on doing when the **** hits the fan financially (which looks more and more inevitable , and longer and longer :/)
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#2 Old 09-15-2008, 01:39 PM
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Well, make sure you have a manual can opener, and not just an electric one. That'll be important if you do "settle" for the canned green peas instead of your fresh-from-the-garden green peas.

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#3 Old 09-15-2008, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by treyb View Post

What are you other vegans planning on doing when the **** hits the fan financially (which looks more and more inevitable , and longer and longer :/)



If times get tough I'm planning on staying connected with my community, friends, family and neighbors to help them and get help as needed. For me hoarding food is not a very high priority compared to that.
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#4 Old 09-15-2008, 01:45 PM
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Only today I added 3 bags of rice and 2 of pasta to my shopping.. don't need them but hey-ho.



Tinned tomatoes are good for curries, tomato pasta sauce, veggies with lentils / chick peas etc. That sort of food is easy to store.



I don't see anything wrong with it, There are 4 of us and if keeping food to one side helps us not have to worry when prices go up, or be able to pay the prices they demand for fresh fruit n' veg then so be it.
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#5 Old 09-15-2008, 01:52 PM
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Of course get together with your community, but I don't know any other people really besides myself that eat the way I do, so it'll be a little more difficult to go over to a neighbors house and share food with them, unless I plan on eating crap. I would prefer not to, but if it's nothing or crap, I guess I would choose crap
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#6 Old 09-15-2008, 01:55 PM
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Whole grains and dried beans store really well. You can also store seeds for sprouting and for growing a garden (start gardening now so when you have to depend on it to survive, you won't have to wait six weeks to make a salad, plus home-grown veggies are awesome.)



The real key is to store what you eat, and eat what you store. Even foods that store for a long time will lose flavor and nutritional value eventually. So make sure you don't store more than you can use before it goes bad and rotate what you have.



Also remember, even though widespread financial disaster is unlikely, personal financial emergencies and local disasters could happen any time. You don't want to be worrying about when you'll get your next meal when there's an emergency. It's like having a emergency bank account just for food.



It's also a good idea to store about two weeks supply of water and have a water purification kit in case there's a water emergency that lasts longer than two weeks.
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#7 Old 09-15-2008, 02:00 PM
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Buying storable foods in bulk saves a lot of money too. I don't really see it as hoarding, it's more like having a really well stocked pantry.
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#8 Old 09-15-2008, 02:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by treyb View Post

Of course get together with your community, but I don't know any other people really besides myself that eat the way I do, so it'll be a little more difficult to go over to a neighbors house and share food with them, unless I plan on eating crap. I would prefer not to, but if it's nothing or crap, I guess I would choose crap



If you are concerned with the quality of storable foods you could start storing your own, ie canning, drying and otherwise preserving your own fruits and vegetables. Then you can be assured they are top quality and you can try to store them in the least nutritionally damaging way possible. That takes time though, which you might not have, and work.



We used to store a lot more food, but then it just ended up sitting on the shelf for years and we threw it away. So you want stuff that you will use regularly enough that you go through it gradually and keep replacing it, or it's going to get old and not as tasty or nutritious.



You might also think of things that would be very difficult to grow yourself, if there is a major problem, like oil, salt, vinegar, etc.
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#9 Old 09-15-2008, 02:09 PM
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I'm not really referring to a well stocked pantry. I generally maintain a well-stocked pantry, or should. I'm talking beyond that, post-apocalypse style, how would you handle yourself. Obviously grow what you can, but other than bulk foods you would generally find in your pantry, what else would you get.



Yes canning is good, and I do what I can. I guess I want to get more into dried foods, where you could just add water and you have soup, or whatever it may be. Not really much experience with removing water from items for preservation, really only curing and canning do I have any knowledge of, or ability to do.
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#10 Old 09-15-2008, 02:09 PM
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^^^ And you can save money when you buy in bulk on sale or when you find some other really good deal.

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#11 Old 09-15-2008, 02:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codemonkey View Post

Buying storable foods in bulk saves a lot of money too. I don't really see it as hoarding, it's more like having a really well stocked pantry.



I don't mean to be snarky to the original poster, sorry- of course it's a good idea to keep emergency supplies on hand and I'd never discourage that.



It's just that I alway get faintly annoyed whenever something goes wrong or might potentially do so (Y2K, economic downturns, and so on) and people immediately begin talking about storing up food before anything else. That kind of a focus isn't what got the US through the great depression, WWII and other tough periods. It's just awfully pessimistic.



Just sayin... sorry, wasn't trying to hijack this thread. Just a pet peeve.

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#12 Old 09-15-2008, 02:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by treyb View Post

I'm not really referring to a well stocked pantry. I generally maintain a well-stocked pantry, or should. I'm talking beyond that, post-apocalypse style, how would you handle yourself. Obviously grow what you can, but other than bulk foods you would generally find in your pantry, what else would you get.



I think the key for surviving in post-apocalyptic-style is learning to be self-sufficient. Learning to grow your own food, learning how to forage, learning how to purify water for drinking, learning how to make your own clothes, learning how to cook without electricity. These are valuable skills even if there's never an end-of-the-world disaster. You can only store so much food before it becomes impractical.
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#13 Old 09-15-2008, 02:22 PM
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Oh, and a good website for food storage and emergency preparedness is www.simplylivingsmart.com



It's not vegan specifically but it can be easily modified.



I think year of food storage would get your through most emergencies or at least sustain you long enough until you can get to the point where you can grow all of your food yourself.
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#14 Old 09-15-2008, 02:23 PM
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Rationing was wide spread during WWII in the UK, along with 'dig for vicotry'.



I have a good sized veggie garden in the summer but sadly it was almost wiped out due to the rains we have had. There are a LOT of crops that have failed in the UK due to the same reason and we had already seen petrol / gas increase, household fuels have increased and food also, bread has gone up by about 30-40p a loaf.. add to this failure of crops and we are headed for more increased prices.



If stocking a bit of food that we will eventually eat - no matter what happens - helps me feel able to feed my family securely then so be it. I plan on adding more but not panic buying. If nothing else I'll get some cheap shopping bills in the future.



I have next years seeds in and probably enough for another year after that, also winter onions and broccoli to be planted out soon... if it ever dries up!!
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#15 Old 09-15-2008, 02:29 PM
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Oh, and put together a little vegan 72 hour kit in case there's an emergency where you have to leave the house and you won't be able to get to your long-term storage. Pack a bag for each person in your household with 3 days worth of basic supplies. You'll want to rotate that food, too.
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#16 Old 09-15-2008, 03:10 PM
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Here's some info that will help you with your food storage (plagiarized from http://simplylivingsmart.com/food-st...started.html):



Quote:

Water:

This is the first thing you MUST have in your food storage. Every guide I have read, from government publications to church guidelines suggest 1 gallon per person per day for two weeks. That means 14 gallons per person in the household. PLUS you need the knowledge and ability to clarify and purify more. See our Emergency Preparedness lesson on Water. You cannot survive without water. Within hours of an emergency, water will become critical. So, on our 7 plus 1 chart, Water is the PLUS one, right in the center.



Wheat and Grains:

Wheat is the King of grains. It is amazingly versatile. Most people think of bread, but wheat can be used for tortillas and rolls, crackers, cakes, cookies, and pies. But, it can also be prepared as an alternative to meat and as a sweetner. With appropriate spices, wheat can "become" just about anything. But Wheat is only one of the grains. The other grains provide wonderful taste alternatives to wheat in many recipes. Also, for those who are gluten intolerant, many of the other grains can be substitued. Please see our article "Summary of Grains and their Uses". Experiment with various other grains as your experience increases.



Legumes:

Beans are the natural complement to Wheat and grains. Separately, neither wheat nor grain contains a complete protein because one or more of the eight essential amino acids are missing or in short supply. However, mixing grains, seeds, and legumes provide all of the essential amino acids to build complete protein.



Most people think only of cooked beans in their whole form. And many, including myself before I learned more, didn't really care for beans. I like chile, but I'm not a whole bean fan. But, by grinding beans into a flour, you can use them in your recipes. Anitra will show you some marvelous recipes. We now use beans nearly every day, in breads, in smoothies, in gravy . . . in almost every way you can imagine. And no, you don't get the gas you might otherwise get and no, your foods don't taste like lima beans. Learning how to use beans is one of the most remarkeable "secrets" about food storage.



Next they talk about powdered dairy. This part you'll have to modify vegan-style. You can get powdered soymilk or you can store soybeans and make your own. They also talk about powdered margarine, powdered cheese and powdered eggs but you can veganize all that too. You can store nutritional yeast and egg replacer and you'll be good to go.



Quote:

Sprouts:

When I learned about sprouts, my whole perspective on foods storage changed. Sprouts multiply the vitamins and nutrients in seeds and nuts. By learning to sprout a few different variety of seeds and nuts, you can acquire ALL of the vitamins and essential nutrition that you need. Anitra uses a variety of sprouts throughout her lessons. The health benefits have been well researched and documented.



Next is another one you'll have to veganize. They only mention honey specifically because because it stores so well. If you don't eat honey, there's plenty of other sweeteners that you can store.



Quote:

Honey and Sweetners:

There are a variety of sweetners to store in your food storage. Honey is natural and the most healthy. But most of us will also store processed sugar. Also consider molasses and maple. We don't have lessons specifically devoted to sweetners, but nearly all recipes call for one or another. Again, you can use our spreadsheet or www.trackmyfoodstorage.com to determine the amounts that you might need to store. In general, 60lbs per person per year is necessary.



Salt and Seasonings:

You should include 8 pounds of salt per person per year. But the seasonings is up to you.



What do we mean by seasonings? This would include spices, seasonings, bulion cubes or powder (make sure it does not contain MSG), cocoa powder, vanilla, flavorings. etc. I mean every type of seasoning that you would use. The more the variety that you have, the more variety you will have in your dinners. Learn to use a variety. After you establish the basics in seasonings and spices, you can begin to add pudding mixes, drink mixes, and other enhancements. We highly recommend buying your seasonings and spices in bulk. Antira will teach lessons on finding excellent prices on bulk spices and how to organize them.



Oils:

Most sources recommend 10 quarts per person per year. This would include cooking oil, peanut butter, shortening, butter, etc. Remember, that you can get powdered shortening and powdered butter and margarine. This extends the storage life from months to years. Plus, you gain the advantage of making your own mixes which can be used for quick meals.



These are the basic ingredients of a complete food storage. You could easily live off these foods with amazing variety. Nevertheless, these are only the basics.



You will also want to consider storing foods with these methods. We will add more and more articles and videos to these topics in the future:

commercially canned foods (buying at case-lot sales)

home-canning or bottled foods (basic processes and equipment)

dehydrating, including commercially freeze dried and open sun drying

gardening (including square foot and indoor gardening)

textured vegetable protein (TVP)

root storage principles

freezing



They sum it all up by saying:

Quote:

Food storage is NOT just a can of wheat in your basement or closet. It is part of your pantry.

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#17 Old 09-16-2008, 01:26 AM
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A good way to prepare is to have a stock of screws. Screws are really hard to make by oneself, and are infinitely useful. If you have screws, you can trade for anything.
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#18 Old 03-03-2009, 03:58 PM
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It makes sense to have a decent amount of food and supplies stocked in case of emergencies when you are vegan. The fema kits contain some vegetarian meals but I never saw any vegan ones, and the way they are distributed in an emergency, it's pretty much impossible to get the ones you want unless you find people willing to trade. I'm gradually filling my pantry in case our area gets hit by another hurricane or if a pandemic flu creates quarantines.
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#19 Old 03-03-2009, 04:06 PM
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Stockpiling? It's a recession, not a nuclear winter.

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#20 Old 03-03-2009, 04:25 PM
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I was doing my own thing quietly and YOU are the one who created this post trying to make a big deal out of it. Keep flaming the fire. That must be what you want.

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#21 Old 03-03-2009, 05:21 PM
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Technically, you would be better off putting your money in a savings account. That way, you earn interest. You don't earn interest on food spoiling.



But if there was a major disaster you would not be able to access the money.
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#22 Old 03-03-2009, 05:26 PM
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regardless of if you can get the money or not, there's not gonna be anything to buy in most scenarios of this nature
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#23 Old 03-03-2009, 05:41 PM
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very true..



just wondering how many people think armageddon is on our doorstep?
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#24 Old 03-03-2009, 08:23 PM
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Hmm. Some of us live in earthquake country, and this is second nature. No need for armageddon.

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#25 Old 03-03-2009, 08:41 PM
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Or some of us live in Tornado country as well
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#26 Old 03-03-2009, 09:14 PM
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Some of us just live on the edge in general.

"Yes! Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!" Auntie Mame
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#27 Old 03-04-2009, 08:38 PM
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Quote:
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Oh, and a good website for food storage and emergency preparedness is www.simplylivingsmart.com



It's not vegan specifically but it can be easily modified.



That website was interesting.

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#28 Old 03-05-2009, 05:09 AM
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waving from Hurricane country!

I have been stocking the pantry- no so much because I expect mass chaos, but when its bad news every night on the news it makes me feel a little better to have it there. Plus I have only been stocking up on sales so it will save us money as we eat it down.



Amazon sells bulk grains and beans no shipping cost! I got a huge box last night, lots of varieties of dried beans you can't find around here. My husband prefers them from dry than canned so that was the main reason, but its going to be fava a cannelinni central around here for a while.



(also got bulk gluten for making my own seitan- woohoo!)
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#29 Old 03-05-2009, 05:29 AM
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(also got bulk gluten for making my own seitan- woohoo!)



Oooo... Gluten...



I do like to make seitan.
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#30 Old 03-05-2009, 10:35 AM
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Interesting discussion...I love it when folks are willing to take care of themselves in tough times instead of depending on Federal/State/Local governments, Community, neighbors and friends. It's a strong person to know that we can only depend on ourselves.

I have been trying to get my DIL to start putting food and the like away just in case she and my son wind up jobless for a time and the DIL always says "My Mom will give us stuff and I know you will too". Well...If the time comes and she is asking us for food she will find herself working for it...cleaning hen house, pulling weeds, helping me can up the garden produce, etc. I only help those that are willing to help themselves.... My son's know this well...
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