Animal Ingredients List from CaringConsumer.com - Page 3 - VeggieBoards
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#61 Old 04-02-2009, 02:22 AM
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I am not sure if this has been mentioned but Sainsburys do say vegetarian/ vegan or vegetarian only. This is a huge help and i am impressed with the labelling.
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#62 Old 05-13-2009, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by T(m)B!B View Post

I dunno if its already been posted before.

But I found this website;



http://www.isitvegan.info/



that website no longer works
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#63 Old 08-11-2009, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by T(m)B!B View Post

I dunno if its already been posted before.

But I found this website;



http://www.isitvegan.info/



Which as proved a great resource for me.

Its so simple, typ in the name of a product, or catogory of product you want and it tells you quickly if its vegan friendly or not by either a green tick or a red cross.

Takes seconds to check a whole variety of products.

I dunno how valuble a resouce it would be for anyone living outside of the UK.

But I think for anyone in the UK its a must have in your favourits.



-that link errored out when I clicked it, but I found and opened this:

http://isitvegan.com/
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#64 Old 08-13-2009, 12:23 PM
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I actually made small little booklets with this list, perfect for your wallet. If anyone wants me to mail them one just send me a message on my blog.



http://theveganmerge.blogspot.com
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#65 Old 08-23-2009, 12:06 AM
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Good work kaycee
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#66 Old 10-13-2009, 02:03 AM
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We're going to have a meet in the next month or so, still working on the dates and location since we're spread out all over the Bay Area, so keep checking this thread.





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#67 Old 11-15-2009, 02:27 AM
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Originally Posted by soilman View Post

By promoting a terribly inaccurate and confused list, you support the claims of non-vegetarians who claim that vegetarians are a people, who as a group, make arbitrary, scienfically-uninformed decisions regarding what to eat and what to buy. If you don't buy a jar of olives because the label says the jar contains lactic acid, educated people will see a foolish person who is blindly following an arbitrary list. Because the lactic acid listed always refers to lactic acid made by fermentation of vegetable-origin carbohydrates. That is just reality of the way things are in regard to commercial sources of lactic acid, such as that added to olives in jars. It all comes from vegetable-source carbohydrate fermentation. To say that, in this context, that lactic acid is a possible animal ingredient that has vegan alternatives, is just incorrect, ill-informed, and to insist it it so because some list, by a group with no reputation for journalistic or scientific accuracy, or even a claim of such accuracy, says that it so - is evidence of the blind leading the blind.



Veg's who want to be taken seriously need to be a bit less naive about what they accept as fact, and a bit more critical.



You know, I am not pefect, and I can make errors too. However if you think I am mistaken about where an ingredient came from, please try and find some unbiased, reputable information about where it came from. Don't just tell me well "Caring Consumers said so and everybody follows Caring Consumers because that's what they have on their ipods". That is a ridiculous reason to use to support your claim that the info is accurate.



I've found your posts in this topic very informative so thanks. I'm probably going to get a lot of this wrong since I'm just starting out, but I think now I'll be a little more wary of taking lists at face value without putting forth any research into them. It is difficult though. I'm not the most scientific minded person. You've put these few issues into terms I can understand, but there isn't always going to be someone there to do that for me, and not every source can be trusted.
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#68 Old 11-17-2009, 04:54 AM
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Quote:
I've found your posts in this topic very informative so thanks. I'm probably going to get a lot of this wrong since I'm just starting out, but I think now I'll be a little more wary of taking lists at face value without putting forth any research into them. It is difficult though. I'm not the most scientific minded person. You've put these few issues into terms I can understand, but there isn't always going to be someone there to do that for me, and not every source can be trusted.



You're welcome.



In the US, manufacturers are supposed to list all the ingredients in a product, (1) after the word ingredients: (the colon is required), and (2) in order of predominance.



Thus unless a food is extraordinarily salty, you can presume that everything listed after the word "salt" is present in rather small amounts. So if you see "mono and di glycerides" (which can come from animal fats or plant oils, usually both unless it says otherwise) after the word salt you can presume there isn't an awful lot of it. For some ingredients, the amounts present in a product may be less than the amount of insects in it, that ended up in the product as a result of accidently falling into the flour contained in the product, while the flour was being ground.



While personally I tend to be rather obsessive about avoiding animal-origin ingredients, even in small amounts, not everyone is, and most people, including me, are going to believe you are vegan, if you buy and eat loaves of bread with an ingredient list having "mono and di glycerides" down near the end of the list. That said, I think my purpose for being vegan is to make myself happy, rather than to convince others that I am sufficiently vegan to belong to some vegan clique. It is entirely up to you to decide whether you are going to go spend precious time looking for alternatives, when in a whole loaf, there is less than a 1/4 teaspoon of animal-origin glycerides. If being obsessive about knowing as much as you can, about every ingredient in every product, will make you as happy as it makes me - do it. If you feel this is not the best way to priortize your time - don't do it.



No matter how relaxed, or meticulous, you are going to be, about avoiding animal-origin ingredients, if you aren't scientific-minded yourself, then you may have to trust those who are. Which is why you should not trust a list written by Peta, which isn't a scientific organization, and that does not list an author with scientific credentials, or reputation, as responsible for the content of the list. In fact, they list no author whatsoever - something that any journalist can tell you is a clear tip-off that you can not trust the information. This goes even for scientific organizations - should they publish some sort of pamphlet, and not list any author who do you can hold responsible for its contents. Hold a corporation responsible? Good luck.



If the American Cancer society publishes a pamphlet, and it says "copyright 2007, American Cancer Society" and doesn't list any specific author or authors, yes, you should be skeptical about its contents, despite any reputation that the American Cancer Society has, for being a source of funding for medical experiments. A corporation is, legally, a fictitious person. The legal term is "legal fiction." It is treated, in certain areas of the law, as if it were an individual, but in truth, we all know it really not a descrete individual, but rather, is a symbolic representation for the combined efforts of a multitude of descrete individuals toward certain limited goals. Some of these individual have better reputations than others. A corporation is a legal fiction, a legal individual, for accounting purposes, accounting for income and expenses, assets (including patents) and liabilities, and certain areas of civil responsibility - not for purposes of being held accountable for the truth of scientific claims.



If you can't understand scientific journals, you will have to depend on journalists who have taken on the job of making scientific information understandable to the average person, and who have a reputation for doing so reliably. I know that Scientific American (which is intended for lay-persons) lists an author for every article it publishes.



If you see a list of ingredients that does not follow the word "ingredients:" (including the colon), you can presume that the list is accurate (false advertising is illegal), but incomplete. For example if you see a bottle of beer that says "made from carefully selected barley and hops" that doesn't mean that it isn't also made from corn and 6 or 7 other ingredients. Product labelers can be a bit sneaky about this. Beer may still be exempt from ingredient-listing regulations. Meaning that the ingredients don't have to be listed, but there is nothing to prevent manufacturers from mentioning some of the ingredients. Also, in the US, food not sold interstate, is not subject to federal laws regarding ingredient lists. It is very common for bread that is baked and sold locally to contain incomplete ingredient lists. Also, since there is no enforcement on a local level, of truth in ingredient lists, if is very common for ingredient lists on locally baked products to be wholly fictional. I can't tell you how many times I've seen loaves of bread with long ingredient lists, including 5 different "dough conditioners," and no mention of the word corn meal, yet I see corn meal on the bottom surface of the loaf (corn meal is commonly used to help prevent loaves from sticking to the baking pan). I can tell by looking at it that it is not wheat. Or no mention of the word "sesame seeds" and I see sesame seeds all over the top of the loaf. If bakers are not afraid to neglect to mention sesame seeds (which conceivably some people could be highly allergic to), glob knows what else is in the loaf, that they forgot to mention.



Germany is reported to have some of the most stringent laws regarding listing of all ingredients, in detail.
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#69 Old 04-02-2010, 08:04 PM
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I just wanted to ask everyone's opinion on this booklet:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/190...ef=oss_product



I just got it today, and it seems very helpful. I'm hoping keeping it in my purse will be easy enough, and that it is thorough and accurate.



If anyone has read this and has found errors, could you post them?
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#70 Old 06-22-2010, 04:50 AM
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Do we consider cow/ buffalo/ camel/ sheep milk (& their derivatives like butter/ cheese etc.) as non-vegetarian... ?? Soy milk (& Tofu etc.) seem to be adequate & equally/more healthy alternatives AND they are pure vegetarian.
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#71 Old 01-22-2011, 05:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garnett View Post

Beachbnny thank you. I'll print that and stick it in my wallet. At least until I get my pocket sized list from PETA. I appreciate it, even if you listed tallow at least four times and even though the column "widtsh" set is effed.

hey, i looked all over the internet for the pocket size list of 2010 and didnt find it.. I'm a new vegan and this will help me tons in shopping. can you tell me where did you get yours?

herb is the gift from the earth and what's from the earth is of the greatest worth
so before you knock it try it first
you'll see it's a blessing and not a curse
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#72 Old 02-04-2011, 07:37 PM
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I was wondering if this is a reliable article. If so, it's very helpful.

Chillin' in my blue jeans!
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#73 Old 08-22-2011, 03:49 PM
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i look for rennet, dairy, gelatin, & eggs.
i usually google the product to see if its vegan just to make sure. most of the stuff i buy is from trader joes/whole foods which is usually labeled vegetarian or vegan.
makes my life easier
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#74 Old 08-22-2011, 04:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T(m)B!B View Post

I dunno if its already been posted before.

But I found this website;



http://www.isitvegan.info/



Which as proved a great resource for me.

Its so simple, typ in the name of a product, or catogory of product you want and it tells you quickly if its vegan friendly or not by either a green tick or a red cross.

Takes seconds to check a whole variety of products.

I dunno how valuble a resouce it would be for anyone living outside of the UK.

But I think for anyone in the UK its a must have in your favourits.

Awww i got really excited about this website, but it doesnt seem to be working

Nothing is more sexy than compassion
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#75 Old 10-13-2011, 06:33 PM
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Originally Posted by jackbezos View Post

Do we consider cow/ buffalo/ camel/ sheep milk (& their derivatives like butter/ cheese etc.) as non-vegetarian... ?? Soy milk (& Tofu etc.) seem to be adequate & equally/more healthy alternatives AND they are pure vegetarian.

Any dairy products, no matter what animal it comes from, is considered vegetarian. They are not vegan, however. Vegetarians don't eat any meat, poultry, or fish, but they eat dairy and eggs. Vegans eat nothing that comes from any animal, including dairy, eggs, and honey.
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#76 Old 10-21-2011, 10:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Tissigirl View Post

Any dairy products, no matter what animal it comes from, is considered vegetarian.

Cheese with rennet isn't vegetarian.
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#77 Old 10-21-2011, 11:13 AM
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Thanks so much for this list. I copied and pasted it into a word document. Now anytime I can simply search a word when I'm not sure. Wow!
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#78 Old 10-21-2011, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by agalloch View Post

Cheese with rennet isn't vegetarian.

I meant milk specifically, in response to the message about different animal milks. I mistakenly typed dairy however. :-)
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#79 Old 12-28-2011, 07:17 PM
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They say "in almost all vertebrates and in berries. Used as a preservative in mouthwashes...etc."

As if the benzoic acid used as a preservative in mouthwashes came from vertebrates.

I'm pretty sure that the benzoic acid that is an ingredient of mouthwashes was not sourced from "vertebrates." I'd guess that someone read somewhere that benzoic acid exists in all vertebrates, and jumped to the conclusion that some commercial benzoic acid may come from vertebrates. I could be wrong but I don't think any of it does.

They say "Alternatives: cranberries, gum benzoin (tincture) from the aromatic balsamic resin from trees grown in China, Sumatra, Thailand, and Cambodia."

The way they speak about benzoic acid and the way they list the "alternative sources" to benzoic acid - this is like if I were to say about water...

Water is in almost all vertebrates. Alternatives: desalinization of sea water, above-ground or underground springs, from the protected sources found in Poland, Maine and nearby villages, and the Rocky Mountains.

Sure, water is in all vertebrates. But if you see water listed as an ingredient, it almost certainly came from a spring (either an above-ground spring or a groundwater spring), not a chicken, a salamander, or racoon. You could extract pure water from chicken brains, that tastes just like "tap water" (which comes from above-ground or underground springs), and use it to make beer, that tastes just like that tasty brand that is made from "Rocky Mountain spring water," or you could use it to make soft drinks. But most of the time, the water in beer and soft drinks comes from somewhere else, not from chicken brains. I'm pretty sure.

Elsewhere they say: "Collagen. Fibrous protein in vertebrates. Usually derived from animal tissue. "

No, collagen is always derived from animals. Almost always cattle or porkers. Collagen is, by definition, animal protein. By the way, the most abundant protein in any vertebrate, and the protein that serves to give many animal tissues and organs their strength, and structure.
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#80 Old 05-20-2012, 08:13 AM
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The best, most complete list I've found so far is VRG's.

My own list is incomplete, but in regard to some of the ingredients it covers, it is very detailed. Earthly origin of commercial materials educational org.
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#81 Old 05-23-2012, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by shoutvegan View Post

I have just set up a new vegan online magazine and have a section called 'what is in..' and I must say it has been fascinating researching this. I am only at the start but already have found out a lot about wine and breakfast cereal! I realised I had not been vegan even though I thought I was due to all the rubbish that goes into food and drink production that you just don't know about - I only found out about isinglass (the fish bladder ingredient used to fine wines and other alcoholic beverages!). So I am on a mission!

Cool. But how do we find your on-line magazine and the "what is in" section? You don't give us even a clue.

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#82 Old 05-23-2012, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by agalloch View Post


Cheese with rennet isn't vegetarian.

True rennet is made from digestive organs of a calve, but some "rennet" is made by carbohydrate fermentation, and thus cheese made with it would  seem suitable for non-vegan "vegetarians."

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