Anyone make their own bread? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 02-26-2007, 11:57 AM
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Hey guys! (And girls, of course. )



I have tried MANY Vegan bread recipes in my day - and they simply do not turn out like I would hope. I am very into the whole-wheat flour, you see - and like cookies, the breads I make do not seem to rise very well. I have a feeling that this is due to the whole wheat flour.



Anyway, I would like to start making my own bread. This way, I will know what goes into it, as well as what goes into my body (plus, it will eliminate searching around the store for hours looking for a good, healthy and vegan-safe bread that is under five dollars.)



So, who here is willing to share a healthy and nutritious bread recipe with an obviously bad baker? It does not have to be whole-wheat entirely, but I do prefer whole wheat. I also have corn-flour as well.



Thanks!



Austin
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#2 Old 02-26-2007, 12:07 PM
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i "make" bread several times a week. what i mean by that is, i throw the ingredients into a bread machine, and out pops bread. i use the standard recipes that come with the machine, vegan-ified. for whole wheat, i add extra sugar and yeast.
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#3 Old 02-26-2007, 12:14 PM
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Well, maybe I should save up and buy a handy bread machine then, eh?...





Still accepting recipes until then, though.



(Also, how about tortillas? I am hard-pressed to find a recipe that does not involve frying them in a heap of oil, and I can not seem to find any without the unknown monoglycerides.)
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#4 Old 02-26-2007, 12:15 PM
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I don't know if you are looking for bread to make a sandwich type thing or what you want from the bread but this is my all time favorite recipe. It's so easy and is the best bread in the whole world. I've shared this recipe a hundred times and it never fails that everyone loves it. I have lots of variations and suggestions should you want them It's really forgiving and easy once you get comfortable with the recipe you'll make it without thinking.



BTW- no bread maker needed!



I have to say it's not really my own recipe- though I've changed it quite a few times I can't remember where I got it years ago



Enjoy!



BIG Bread



Ingredients (may use vegan versions):



2 packs of yeast

1/4 cup warm water

2 cups hot water

3 tablespoons sugar

1 tablespoon salt

3 cups flour

1/3 cup vegetable or corn oil

3 cups flour



Directions:



Note: This recipe works best if all ingredients are set out, ready to go, in advance. Also, make sure the vegan sugar, salt, flour, and oil are measured in the exact amounts called for.



Pour warm water into a small ceramic bowl and add the yeast, but DO NOT STIR. Set aside.



In a large mixing bowl, pour hot water over the vegan sugar and salt, then stir with a wooden spoon to completely dissolve. ( I sometimes add seasonings here) Combine 3 cups flour with the water mixture. Pour the oil on top of the dough mixture then add the yeast mixture on top of that, but DO NOT STIR. Top with the remaining 3 cups of flour and mix well. (I begin mixing with the wooden spoon but I very quickly have to move into squishing the dough with my hands.) At this point, the dough should be pliant and moist, but not gooey. Cover the bowl with a damp towel and set aside to rise for at least 45 minutes. (I've left it for almost two hours.)



On a lightly floured cutting board or countertop, divide the dough into half. (You can knead it at this point but the recipe calls for no kneading- sometimes I do, sometimes I don’t either way it’s yum) Flatten each half into roughly an oval/rounded rectangular shape, about 1/2- to 3/4-inch thickness; then roll the dough lengthwise and place on an ungreased, but very BIG, cookie sheet. (If you don't have a very large cookie sheet, use two cookie sheets, one for each half of the dough. I don’t own a rolling pin so I just kinda flatten it out) Cover the dough with a moist towel and set aside to rise again for another 45 minutes (or longer).



After the dough has risen the second time, preheat the oven to 375 and bake for about 23 minutes. If you can keep everyone from digging in right away, allow to cool for about 15 minutes and then enjoy. (Also, before the bread bakes, you can slit the top of each lump of dough a couple of times and brush lightly with some kind of egg substitute. The glaze helps the bread come out with a slightly crunchier crust. I use EVOO here instead and sprinkle with herbs.)



Nutritional Information? Good question.



Serves: 2 huge loaves



Preparation time: Two hours
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#5 Old 02-26-2007, 12:38 PM
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Awesome! Thanks a million.



Also, does anyone know if Smart-Balance Light is Vegan safe?... I don't have the package to it, and for right now it is all I have. (My mom bought it. She doesn't check ingredients EVER.)



Edit:



It appears to have lactate... Yet it is on this list: http://www.geari.org/vegan-products-...html#breakfast



... Hmmm....
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#6 Old 02-26-2007, 01:07 PM
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One thing I need to mention is that either having a bread machine, or spending at least half an hour beating and kneading the dough (to develop the gluten which shapes the bread) and making sure you give it ample time to rise (so you don't get overly dense bread) makes a lot of difference.
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#7 Old 02-26-2007, 01:07 PM
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Smart Balance Light and Earth Balance are vegan safe.
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#8 Old 02-26-2007, 01:25 PM
 
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I've just been starting to explore making our own bread. I really like sourdough, but was hoping to incorporate whole wheat flour (which causes the density problems you're describing). I found this site just today:

http://www.sourdoughhome.com/index.html



There are several recipes there. It's not a vegan site, but what I saw could be easily veganized (use non-dairy milks, and a sweetener other than honey, for example).



I've made sourdough a couple of times as an adult, but I haven't really done any significant breadmaking since I was a kid. I remember it being pretty labor intensive, but with delicious results.

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#9 Old 02-26-2007, 01:35 PM
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Thanks a million, everyone!



:: I know what sourdough is like! A pain in the ass to make, but it sure is good!
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#10 Old 02-26-2007, 02:12 PM
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I love Beachbnny's recipe for the big bread as well. It is from VegWeb. If you want to make a whole wheat version, use only 5 total cups of flour (2.5 and 2.5 cups instead of 3 cups and 3 cups). I usually just measure out 5 cups into a bowl (after sifting it! - very important) and take roughly half and then add the other half later. Just let it rise nice and big before you put it into the oven. It's a really hard recipe to mess up, and super easy.
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#11 Old 02-26-2007, 02:17 PM
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Heres my basic recipe for whole wheat bread:





1 ¼ cups water



2 teaspoons lemon juice



2 tablespoons margarine, melted



6 tablespoons glucose



4 ounces Bobs Red Mill 10-grain flour, sifted.



12 ounces Harvest King bread flour, sifted



1 teaspoon sea salt



2 ¼ teaspoons active dry yeast





Throw everything in the bread machine and follow the manufacturers instructions for whole wheat bread.
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#12 Old 02-26-2007, 02:21 PM
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i make my own bread i love it it is always amazing
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#13 Old 02-26-2007, 02:27 PM
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OMG- thank you Fyvel! There's my little comment down there from years and years ago. Glad I can source it now



It really is easy and delicious...
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#14 Old 02-26-2007, 02:33 PM
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My mom makes sour dough bread sometimes... I don't know her recipe, and I don't know if it's vegan, but it's really good and you've made me hungry!!
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#15 Old 02-26-2007, 02:49 PM
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I'm a bread baker too- but I bake by feel. I measure the yeast and water, but everything else (rolled oats, rolled rye, whole wheat flour) sort of just gets dumped in until the dough has the right texture. So unfortunately, I cant really give you a recipe.



However... when I first started baking, I also had the problem of very heavy bread. I think my problem was that the dough was too dry and stiff. The trick is to add just enough flour so that the dough doesnt try to devour you like The Blob or Kal-Tiki The Immortal Monster- in other words, it shouldnt be too sticky to work with. I must admit that whole grains are more difficult than white flour in this respect.



Although I cant say precisely how much flour to use, my usual recipe uses rolled oats (or rolled rye), whole wheat flour, water, sugar, and yeast. I use oil or margarine to grease the pans. They say you should use salt to control the yeast and oil in the dough to improve the texture, but I leave both of those out with no trouble. Im not on a restricted diet, but I eat a lot of bread (both store-bought and baked myself), and the bread I buy is fairly high in salt. Still, salt-free bread can take some getting used to, and I have to make sure I dont slather it with too much margarine to make up for that. I use margarine which has no trans-fat, but even so....



Oh! Leftover mashed potatoes are great mixed into bread dough- it smells a bit like french fries when you toast it. Ive also used cornmeal instead of some of the oats and wheat.



I often mix everything except most of the whole wheat flour and let it sit for an hour (this is called a sponge). Then I add the rest of the flour and proceed.



As I mentioned in another thread today, I normally make about four loaves at once and freeze 2 or 3, depending on how much bread I expect to eat in the next few days. This saves time. Ive never used a bread making machine and they only make 1 loaf at a time, but some people just love fresh-baked bread.

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#16 Old 02-26-2007, 04:39 PM
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if that works for you. just sharing. sorry if it's not the answer you're looking for.





Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussyj View Post

Well, maybe I should save up and buy a handy bread machine then, eh?...





Still accepting recipes until then, though.



(Also, how about tortillas? I am hard-pressed to find a recipe that does not involve frying them in a heap of oil, and I can not seem to find any without the unknown monoglycerides.)

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#17 Old 02-26-2007, 06:54 PM
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Smiteth you for answering in such a way, VeggieFrank!



... Naw, I am just kidding. I merely responded in such a way because I am poor at the moment, but that is another story.



I do greatly thank you for your input!



~Austin~
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#18 Old 02-27-2007, 12:57 AM
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The general flatbread recipe I posted below works very well with whole wheat flour. I don't use it with whole wheat flour because I get plenty of exposure to wheat products from pasta. Some advantages to the recipe below vs. leavened bread: 1) fewer ingredients 2) faster preparation 3) no danger of collapse (never rises much in the first place). To start out, you can just try it with wheat flour, olive oil, salt, and pepper, and go from there.



https://www.veggieboards.com/boards/s...ad.php?t=48007



Something to consider when you're in the mood...
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#19 Old 02-27-2007, 10:55 AM
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I love making bread. I've been making wheat bread, pizza crust, muffins and pie crust lately. I tried using a bread maker but the loaves werent always coming out right. They were also too small even though I was using a big machine. I don't really find it that time consuming to make bread from scratch and I feel much better knowing exactly what's in it. I imagine that the hardest thing to learning how to make it would be knowing when the consistancy is right. You need to get the dough so that is balls up easily and isn't sticking to your hands.
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#20 Old 02-27-2007, 11:09 AM
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I love to make bread, too. I prefer to make it by hand, though. It's much more satisfying. Bernard Clayton's New Complete Book of Breads is my favorite bread cookbook - he walks you through the basics and the recipes are pretty easy to veganize. This is from his cookbook, one he calls "First Loaf" and which can easily be modified with different proportions of whole wheat/white flours.



The First Loaf



5 to 6 cups bread or all-purpose flour, approximately

3 tablespoons sugar

2 teaspoons salt

1 package dry yeast

¼ cup nonfat dry milk (or soymilk powder)

2 cups hot water (120-130 degrees use tap water that feels hot to you)

3 tablespoons shortening, room temperature



In large mixing bowl, measure 2 cups flour, the sugar, salt, yeast and dry milk. Pour the hot water into the dry ingredients and beat by hand or with a mixer flat beater to blend thoroughly. Add the shortening; continue beating. Add 1 cup flour and with a wooden spoon beat 100 vigorous strokes, or for 3 minutes at medium speed in the mixer.



If by hand, continue adding flour, ¼ cup at a time, and stirring with a wooden spoon until it becomes a shaggy mass. Work more flour into the dough with your hands if it is sticky. If by mixer, attach the dough hook and add flour, ¼ cup at a time, until the dough forms a soft, elastic ball around the revolving hook.



If by hand, turn onto a floured surface and begin to knead with a strong push-turn-fold motion. Occasionally bring the dough down hard against the work surface with a sharp whack! Do this several times during the process. If the dough continues to be sticky, add light sprinkles of flour. If using the dough hook, continue to knead for 10 minutes. If the dough sticks to the side of the bowl, add sprinkles of flour. Should the dough try to climb over the protective collar at the top of the hook as it turns, hold it back with the edge of a rubber spatula.



When properly kneaded, the dough will be soft and elastic. It can be pulled into a think sheet when stretched between the hands. (If the dough becomes a hard ball, work 1 to 2 teaspoons of water into the dough.)



Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl, cover tightly with plastic wrap to retain moisture, and leave at room temperature until the dough has doubled in bulk, about 1 hour. (Time will vary depending on whether you use the fast acting yeast, and how warm your house is.)



Turn back plastic wrap and punch down the dough. Turn it onto the floured work surface and knead or a minute or so to force out any bubbles. Divide the dough into 2 pieces with a sharp knife.



Shape each piece into a ball and let it rest for 2 to 3 minutes. Form a loaf by pressing the ball of dough into a flat oval roughly the length of the baking pan. Fold the oval in half, pinch the seam tightly to seal, tuck under the ends, and place seam down in the pan.



Cover the pans with wax or parchment paper and leave until the dough has doubled in volume, about 45 minutes at room temperature.



Preheat oven to 400 about 20 minutes before baking.



Place the loaves in the hot oven for 10 minues, THEN LOWER THE HEAT to 350 for an additional 25 to 30 minutes. When the loaves are a golden brown and sound hollow when thumped on the bottom crust, they are done.



Cool.
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#21 Old 02-27-2007, 11:13 AM
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Na but I once made whole wheat pizza crust by scratch

let it rise in the sun like a goddess...I felt so proud...
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#22 Old 02-27-2007, 12:17 PM
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just a hint

use your left over water from the potatoes that you cook (you might have to boil the water to reduce it down ) it really adds a nutty flavor seems to make the bread lighter
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#23 Old 02-27-2007, 12:53 PM
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This is the bread I started off with:



Classic Sandwich Bread



2 1/4 teaspoons dry active yeast (1 envelope)

1/2 teaspoon sugar

1 cup warm milk

1 Tablespoon honey/agave nectar/ molasses

1/4 cup vegetable oil

2 1/2 teaspoon salt

5-6 cups bread flour (near specialty flours)
  • In a small bowl, stir 1/2 cup warm water and the yeast together (add water to yeast, for easiest mixing), and set aside until foamy, about 10 minutes. (if it does not foam, your yeast is no longer good, and you need more) In a larger bowl, combine the milk, 1 cup warm water, the honey, oil, and salt, then stir in the proofed yeast. Using a wooden spoon (or the paddle accessory of an electric mixer) work in the flour one cup at a time until you have a shaggy, heavy dough, that leaves the sides of the bowl.
  • Turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and gradually knewad in the remaining flour until the dough is smooth and resiliant (you poke it, it returns to shape quickly), about 5 minutes.
  • Put dough in deep oiled bowl, turning it so that the top is oiled too. cover with a damp towel and set in a warm place to rise until doubled in bulk (and hour or longer)
  • Deflate the dough by pressing down on it, then divide it into two equal pieces (or cut into rolls), shape into balls, cover, and let rest for 10 minutes. meanwhile, oil two bread pans. Flatten the dough into two rectangles the length of the pan. Roll it up tightly, pinsh the seams together to esal the ends, adn place in the pans, seam-side down. Cover again and let rise until the dough is just above the edge of the pan, about 35 minutes.
  • Preheat the oven to 375*F. Leave the dough as is or score the top with three diagonal slashes (use a steak knife). Brush with the egg glaze and bake until browned and pulilng away from the sides, 40-45 minutes. If the tops get too dark, loosely cover with foil.
  • Turn the bread out, tap the bottom to make sure it has a hollow sound, not a thud, then set on a rack to cool.
~~~~~~~~



Now, this makes 2 loaves, so when I allow to rise that 2nd time, before putting into the loaf pan, I freeze one. When I'm ready for another loaf, I just thaw it out, let it rise in the loaf pan, and bake. ONE of these will get me through a week for sandwich bread or rolls with dinner (just shape and bake less time, usually 20-25m). If I'm making soups a lot, though, we go through it faster.



~~~~~~~~~



ere's the recipe I use to make 100% whole wheat bread. It does take a little longer, and more waiting here and there, but we like this one better:



Whole-wheat sandwich bread:

The sponge: (starter)

2 1/4 t (1 envelope) active dry yeast

1/4 c unsulfured molasses

2/3 c nonfat dry milk or dried buttermilk/ soy milk

1/2 c vital wheat gluten flour

2 c whole-wheat flour



Stir above ingredients until smooth. Scrape down the sides of the bowl, and set aside in a warm place for an hour until it's foamy on top and doubled in volume.



Gently stir down the sponge, then add:



1/3 c vegetable oil

1 1/2 t salt

3 1/2c whole-wheat flour (1/2 cup at a time)



Stir in flour in 1/2 cup increments until you have a shaggy, heavy dough. Turn it out onto a lighlty floured counter and knead in as much flour as teh dough will take, adding it a few Tablespoons at a time. Knead until dough is smooth, but still tacky, 3-5m.

Put dough in oiled bowl, turn to coat the top, then cover and let rise in warm place until doubled in bulk (1 1/2 hours or longer) Deflate the dough, and divide into 2, shape into loaves, and place seam side down in 2 greased bread pans. (if you like a rustic look, roll the loaves into wheat bran or wheat flakes before putting them in the pans) Cover again and set aside until the dough has risen to the edge of the pans, about 45m. During the last 15m, preheat the oven to 375*. Bake in center of the oven until browned, 45-50m. Let cool completely before slicing.



(you can use dry soy milk if you can find it... it's not cheap... or use 2 3/4c warmed up soy/rice/almond/oat milk in place of the water and milk powder)
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#24 Old 02-27-2007, 12:56 PM
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Oh, I do my breads by hand. Bowl and a wooden spoon. No bread machine, no mixer with dough hook. They keep for 5 days or so, in a sealed container. You can freeze the dough OR the bread when done, and it's ready when you are, if you don't go through 2 loaves in that time frame.



Another thing I like to do... make one regular loaf and a batch of hogie buns or something. Or dinner rolls. Just make them in the shape you want and cut cooking time down.



Rolls will usually be done in 15-25m, depending on their size. Smaller, check earlier.



If you want to top with wheat bran or sesame seeds, etc, brush with melted "butter" or oil, then roll in topping or sprinkle it on. When it cooks it will help hold it on. (I tried with water too and it didn't hold any of the seeds on)
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#25 Old 02-27-2007, 06:25 PM
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sorry austin - i was in a mood when i replied. never use the internets in anger, i say





Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussyj View Post

Smiteth you for answering in such a way, VeggieFrank!



... Naw, I am just kidding. I merely responded in such a way because I am poor at the moment, but that is another story.



I do greatly thank you for your input!



~Austin~

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#26 Old 02-28-2007, 09:10 AM
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Oh, I concur! ... I am one known to have done that a lot in the past, and all times it turns out messy.



Hope everything is better for you now!



~Austin~
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#27 Old 03-04-2007, 06:40 PM
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I have a great bread recipe, it tastes great and the crust even comes out soft.



Barbara's Whole Wheat Bread



3-4 cups whole wheat flour

1/2 cup vital wheat gluten

1 tsp salt

3 tbl olive oil

4 tbl honey or molasses

1 1/2 cups warm water

1 pkg regular yeast or 4 tsp yeast



Measure out the first three ingredients into a bowl, set aside. Mix in

a bowl the water (110-120 degrees), olive oil, honey and yeast. Slowly

mix in the flour (I use my Kitchen Aid mixer). Dough should be not

sticking to the sides of the bowl. I usually end up using 3 1/2 cups

of flour. I let my mixer knead the dough for 7-8 minutes. If you

knead by hand, knead for 10-12 minutes. Wheat bread needs a longer

knead time.



Place in oiled bowl in warm place, covered by a towel or plastic wrap,

for about an hour or until about double in size. Punch down, turn out

of bowl. I make the dough into a ball and use a serrated knife to cut

in half. Shape each half into a rectangular roll and place in loaf

pans. Cover and let rise about 45 minutes. Bake at 375 degrees for

25-30 minutes. Bread is done when it sounds hollow when tapped.



Let me know what you think!



Vital wheat gluten (I get mine from Bob's Red Mill) is the trick to getting whole wheat bread that isn't hard as a rock.



Barbara
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#28 Old 03-07-2007, 01:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IamJen View Post

I've just been starting to explore making our own bread. I really like sourdough, but was hoping to incorporate whole wheat flour (which causes the density problems you're describing). I found this site just today:

http://www.sourdoughhome.com/index.html



There are several recipes there. It's not a vegan site, but what I saw could be easily veganized (use non-dairy milks, and a sweetener other than honey, for example).



I've made sourdough a couple of times as an adult, but I haven't really done any significant breadmaking since I was a kid. I remember it being pretty labor intensive, but with delicious results.





Hubby and I (more hubby than I) have been trying to learn how to make sourdough and have experimented with making the starter and the sponge, and though the bread is tasty, it doesn't really taste like sourdough. You know, tangy and chewy.



We've been using a blend of unbleached flour and whole wheat flour. I wonder if that's the problem. Maybe we should stick with all unbleached flour?



Sourdough is one of my favorites breads, so any tips anyone can give, I'm all ears.
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#29 Old 03-07-2007, 02:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunny View Post

Hubby and I (more hubby than I) have been trying to learn how to make sourdough and have experimented with making the starter and the sponge, and though the bread is tasty, it doesn't really taste like sourdough. You know, tangy and chewy.



We've been using a blend of unbleached flour and whole wheat flour. I wonder if that's the problem. Maybe we should stick with all unbleached flour?



Sourdough is one of my favorites breads, so any tips anyone can give, I'm all ears.



How many times are you letting the dough rise? According to one of the pages on the site referenced, it seems that the more times you deflate, knead the dough, and let it rise, the tangier it will be.



http://www.sourdoughhome.com/laurelsloaf.html
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#30 Old 03-07-2007, 02:56 PM
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I read that, too. We knead and let the dough rise twice. Next batch we'll try it three times and see what happens.



Do you know how to get a chewy texture? I'd really love to figure that out.
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