Ugh...I'm such a flip-flopper! - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 11-13-2006, 05:07 PM
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Does anybody else have this problem? Over the course of the last 7 years, I've been, in the following order:



lacto/ovo vegetarian - 2 months

vegan - 1 year

omni - 2 1/2 years

l/o vegetarian - 6 months

vegan - 6 months

l/o vegetarian - 1 year

pescetarian - 1 year

l/o vegetarian - 6 months



...and now I want to be vegan again! My family seems to have had it with me - not my husband and kids, but my extended family. I don't know what is wrong with my resolve, I just feel so pulled in so many directions. I am a nutrition fanatic and I have wrestled a whole lot with the vitamin B-12 issue, I really have a problem with relying on supplements for a vitamin. While I was pregnant I ate fish for awhile because I was worried about the levels of DHA going to my baby and then in my breastmilk.



However - my husband and I just re-watched Meet your Meat, I just re-read Joanne Stepaniak's The Vegan Sourcebook, and I just wish I had never given up being a vegan! Even though we've been using almost exclusively Organic Valley dairy and eggs, I've come to believe that isn't good enough, there are still some fundamental issues with both products, like baby cows being taken away from their mothers!



My husband and I have stopped buying any animal products, we've been cooking completely vegan, and ordering only vegan food at restaurants - but the trouble is, we spend a lot of time with my parents and they are such "cheese pushers" with the kids. I think they have taken solace in the fact that my 3 year old LOVES cheese and they keep all his favorites on hand (like cheese sticks, babybel rounds, etc). Yesterday we finally told them that we were "moving toward" veganism again, but that we weren't going to be strict if we were at other peoples' houses. So then, when my 3 year old announced that he was hungry, my mom turned to him and said, "would you like some cheese?" and proceeded to pull out all kinds of cheese for him.



I'm mostly frustrated at myself, frustrated that I haven't stuck with veganism, that I've kept changing my ways. It's no wonder my family doesn't take it seriously anymore! The worst thing is, now my kids are used to eating cheese, and they see it all the time. My 3 year old is in a co-op preschool 3 days/week and there is ALWAYS cheese at snacktime.



Has anyone else flip-flopped a lot in regard to your veganism? For those of you that have stuck with being vegan for a number of years, what is your secret? Any advice on how to handle outside-the-home situations as we are transitioning back to veganism?
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#2 Old 11-13-2006, 05:29 PM
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First of all:



I wish I could offer advice, but I'm struggling with veganism as well. I made the decision way back about February 2005 to go vegan, and I'm still finding it hard to stick with it.

*this space not for sale*
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#3 Old 11-13-2006, 05:46 PM
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I've never gone back from being vegetarian. I've gone back and forth between levels of vegetarianism, but never stopped being veg.
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#4 Old 11-13-2006, 05:50 PM
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You are a bit of a flip flopper but if you want to go vegan again you have our support, 100%.
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#5 Old 11-13-2006, 06:07 PM
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I can sympathize! I've done...



semi veg (produce only) 2 years

o/l veg 3.5 years

omni 4 years

o/l veg 9 months



and I'm just working up the nerve to attempt the vegan side of things. I know it is what I want to do, but it is a matter of making it work, and having the will power. I see baking as my biggest challenge but am finding good alternatives already.



Veganism is HARD. It takes a lot of work, and that's why it has taken me so long to get to this point where I'm ready to try it. It's not easy, either, having vegetarian or omnis in the immediate family. (the kids eat what I do, and dh eats what I make at home. The kids are vegetarian outside of the house, and dh is omni out of the house.)



I'm also like you in that I'm not strict at other people's houses. I don't want to be rude, and my big thing is an ethical thing, so when my money isn't going toward it I'm not SO worried about it. I don't want people to feel like they can't have us over or that they have to cook something special just because I am coming over. (incedentally we don't go out to friends' much, or out to eat much either, but when we do, I eat what the friends prepare, and order vegan.)



I'm on the fence with my kids. Ovo-lacto, for now, but I'm having the same trouble with my in-laws you are (only, it's feeding them meat! HELLO! Vegetarian = no meat) and it's getting obnoxious. I almost don't want to let the kids go over there during meal times, without supervision. But at the same time, I'm torn between allowing them to make an informed decision about their consumption (my 4 year old said she didn't want to eat animals anymore, so she has an understanding. The 2 year old doesn't, but neither really grasp WHAT an animal is when they are looking at food)



Anyway... I know how it goes and it is tough. But if you feel you want to make that leap again, you know you have support, here, if nowhere else.
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#6 Old 11-13-2006, 06:09 PM
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Just resolve to not eat animal products. Tell your family eating them is not an option, so they do not offer them up.

You can do it. Just post here if you need help!
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#7 Old 11-13-2006, 06:27 PM
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Veganism is a matter of willpower. No one is perfect, and just the fact that you're doing the best you can is enough. I've only been vegan for two months and I'm already finding it to be difficult. I believe it's worth it, though, so if you believe in it just try to be the best you can.



Be firm with the grandparents, telling them you're the parent and it is your decision what your children put into their mouthes, not theirs.



Good luck!
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#8 Old 11-13-2006, 06:31 PM
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The food part of veganism isn't hard. It's the finding of decent animal-free products, like mascara/shampoo/conditioner etc. My mascara has beeswax, and my shampoo has pearl powder in it. Rawr.
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#9 Old 11-13-2006, 06:37 PM
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The food part is hard for me just because I'm still living at home and it's hard to find decent recipes to make without having to run out to the store (which I can't do yet). I also don't have a cookbook yet, but I've been begging my mom.



I would agree that the cosmetics part is a lot more difficult than the food part, though. As of now, I have vegan shampoo and conditioner, plus soap, facewash & toothpaste. However, my makeup is very unvegan. I'm using up the stuff I have before I get vegan stuff. I don't wear much to begin with, but it is frustrating.
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#10 Old 11-13-2006, 06:38 PM
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I flopped for love once.



I ate me some cheese and eggs after being a vegan for five or six years. It made my woman's journey towards veganism easier.



I have since flipped back to veganism. I think Mrs Creezy has too she's a little lax with the cheesiness when we eat out.



I don't plan to ever flop again.



The end.
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#11 Old 11-13-2006, 07:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colorful View Post

Does anybody else have this problem? Over the course of the last 7 years, I've been, in the following order:



lacto/ovo vegetarian - 2 months

vegan - 1 year

omni - 2 1/2 years

l/o vegetarian - 6 months

vegan - 6 months

l/o vegetarian - 1 year

pescetarian - 1 year

l/o vegetarian - 6 months



...and now I want to be vegan again! My family seems to have had it with me - not my husband and kids, but my extended family. I don't know what is wrong with my resolve, I just feel so pulled in so many directions. I am a nutrition fanatic and I have wrestled a whole lot with the vitamin B-12 issue, I really have a problem with relying on supplements for a vitamin. While I was pregnant I ate fish for awhile because I was worried about the levels of DHA going to my baby and then in my breastmilk.



However - my husband and I just re-watched Meet your Meat, I just re-read Joanne Stepaniak's The Vegan Sourcebook, and I just wish I had never given up being a vegan! Even though we've been using almost exclusively Organic Valley dairy and eggs, I've come to believe that isn't good enough, there are still some fundamental issues with both products, like baby cows being taken away from their mothers!



My husband and I have stopped buying any animal products, we've been cooking completely vegan, and ordering only vegan food at restaurants - but the trouble is, we spend a lot of time with my parents and they are such "cheese pushers" with the kids. I think they have taken solace in the fact that my 3 year old LOVES cheese and they keep all his favorites on hand (like cheese sticks, babybel rounds, etc). Yesterday we finally told them that we were "moving toward" veganism again, but that we weren't going to be strict if we were at other peoples' houses. So then, when my 3 year old announced that he was hungry, my mom turned to him and said, "would you like some cheese?" and proceeded to pull out all kinds of cheese for him.



I'm mostly frustrated at myself, frustrated that I haven't stuck with veganism, that I've kept changing my ways. It's no wonder my family doesn't take it seriously anymore! The worst thing is, now my kids are used to eating cheese, and they see it all the time. My 3 year old is in a co-op preschool 3 days/week and there is ALWAYS cheese at snacktime.



Has anyone else flip-flopped a lot in regard to your veganism? For those of you that have stuck with being vegan for a number of years, what is your secret? Any advice on how to handle outside-the-home situations as we are transitioning back to veganism?





I can really empathize with you. I wish you well on your path.



I've actually gone from eating meat to a vegan and back again. I was a veg for 2 years then my ex husband and I reconciled and I got pregnant..lol.

I did not have the support of my husband or my parents of being a vegetarian while pregnant even though my sister was and is a vegetarian while she was pregnant and her baby now 2 is very healthy.



Yet I don't equate someone else's good fortune of a healthy baby to mine and I was pregnant at 38 with my 3rd child. I also had a miscarriage so yes I was very worried about my baby's health so I remained a meat eater.



But going back to veg and vegan has been very difficult for me and I've caused a great deal of stress to myself and I even fell into depression for a while because I could not remain a vegetarian let alone vegan.



My reasons were not only ethical but also health reasons so why I fell all the time caused a great deal of frustration.



I've been frustrated at my resolve..like where is it!

It is hard. My husband is an avid Atkins man and quite frankly I'm exhausted . For me it takes extra energy to maintain this path and I'm already very sleep deprived...for instance my day started at 3 am Sunday morning and did not end until 10pm Sunday night...lol...then I was up at 5 am this morning.



Between my teenager, my 8 year old and my 18 month old ( who does not sleep much) I'm spent! And then theres the husband..lol.



Now I'm just trying to take things slower. Planning ahead too and also not beating myself up...gosh if someone else were treating me the way I treated myself they'd be in jail for assault..lol...anyway sorry for the ramble.. it does help to know that others are experiencing the same maybe in this it will make things a little easier.



Namaste,

Jen
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#12 Old 11-13-2006, 07:36 PM
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I stumbled a few times when I first went vegetarian.

Rather, shortly after I first went vegetarian I went vegan for month, then would have a cheese pizza and ruin it- would try again and last a month or two, then fall to the pizza - did this several times during the first year I went vegetarian until I just stayed lacto for 7 years until I finally came to the point where I realized I was a walking contradiction.

I said I loved animals and yet still supported the dairy industry. I just couldn't handle the hypocrisy and support of veal any longer and made my final decision last December.



I always said going back to veganism was a life goal I hoped to achieve again some day, then I did. It's really one of only two life goals I've reached, and boy did it feel good to actually mark something off that list. The other was to accept God in the center of my life instead of just sort of on the side. I'm not where I really want to be yet, but it feels nice to move in that direction. A lot has changed in just the past year.
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#13 Old 11-13-2006, 07:38 PM
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I found it quite difficult to GET to veganism (coming from my background and with my horrid eating habits), but once I got there it was no problem. I'm more committed to this each and every day. Since I actually decided to be vegan nearly two years ago, there has been no going back.
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#14 Old 11-13-2006, 07:45 PM
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i find it interesting that people become pregnant and begin eating meat (and i will ignore the health reasons comments, as they are unfounded and in fact contradicted by medical organizations). so one brings another life into the world and decides, all of the sudden, that other species do not matter? do humans become more important to people when they are pregnant and other animals that they cared for before less important? do other animals' babies appear tasty somehow because you have a baby inside of you? i seriously am wondering what goes on, not trying to intrude.
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#15 Old 11-13-2006, 07:47 PM
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You are all wonderful! Thanks for the support. I think my vegetarian journey has been more of a 3 steps forward, 2 steps back thing. Initially I went from vegan all the way to omni. This time the farthest back I got was pesco-vegetarian (eating fish maybe twice a month and only consuming organic valley dairy/eggs). Deep down I am a vegan, but I keep getting swept into this darn non-vegan world of ours!



I have a feeling that eventually it is going to be easier and easier to be vegan (or almost-vegan) and stick with it. This time around I have the full support of my husband, he feels just as strongly as I do and that's a big deal. The first time I strayed from my veganism was when I was dating my husband who at that time was a full-on meat-eater.



As far as the cooking and home lifestyle, I'm an old-pro at veganism and even during my other "phases" I still cooked a lot of vegan meals. I have some great cookbooks and some of my favorite dinners are out of Vegan Planet. We always buy cruelty-free shampoos, dishsoaps, etc. I have the great fortune of living in the Seattle area where all that stuff is completely accessible to me. My environment is actually quite supportive of veganism, I really don't have an excuse!
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#16 Old 11-13-2006, 07:58 PM
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Originally Posted by penny79 View Post

i find it interesting that people become pregnant and begin eating meat (and i will ignore the health reasons comments, as they are unfounded and in fact contradicted by medical organizations). so one brings another life into the world and decides, all of the sudden, that other species do not matter? do humans become more important to people when they are pregnant and other animals that they cared for before less important? do other animals' babies appear tasty somehow because you have a baby inside of you? i seriously am wondering what goes on, not trying to intrude.



i actually was just thinking almost the same thing, except more on the health side. I was thinking of maybe starting a thread in the heap. I'm curious to know why people advocate veg*n diets as being healthy when defending or explaining themselves to omnivores, but when they get knocked up it's suddenly unhealthy enough to revert back to omni-ism.



You did bring up a point on the ethical side that I didn't think of. How could "ethical veg*ns" suddenly decide that the diet is unhealthy AND that their ethics suddenly..aren't.



Hmm.. Interesting. Sorry for the hijack. It is a tangent, though!



I did start a thread to ask this. https://www.veggieboards.com/boards/s...68#post1417668
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#17 Old 11-13-2006, 08:50 PM
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Originally Posted by lunawinds View Post

My husband is an avid Atkins man and quite frankly I'm exhausted .

Just some information on Atkins diets. Be sure to check out the links for the full story.



Quote:
Eating only protein (and fat) forces the body into starvation mode after just a few hours. This “starvation mode” happens because the brain typically prefers to run on glucose (blood sugar) which is supplied by digested carbohydrate. Dietary carbohydrate comes in many forms such as foods made with sugar (sodas, sweets) or flour (bakery, crackers, breads), starches, vegetables, fruits and dairy products. Where there is not enough carbohydrate to convert into blood sugar, the body is forced to use stored blood sugar from the liver and muscles. This process results in initial protein tissue (muscle) loss and urinary loss of electrolytes. Because muscle is mostly water, one will lose weight very rapidly in the first few days. If the carbohydrate restriction is prolonged, the brain eventually will run on fat stores for fuel (called ketosis). The amount of weight loss depends on the amount of fat one has stored.



Unfortunately, America’s weight problem is not caused by carbohydrates alone. The type of carbohydrate we eat and the small amount of physical activity we do seemingly have a lot to do with our growing waistlines. Factually, nutrition recommendations for a healthy human body have not changed much over the years. There are foods that have been proven to play an important role in living longer and free of disease. Numerous studies have shown that the higher the percentage of carbohydrate as vegetable (legumes, greens, tomatoes, etc.) and fruit (whole fruits) in the diet, the lower the rates of heart disease and cancers.

Taken From:Ask the dietitian: high protein diets



Quote:
Carbohydrates are eventually metabolized by the body into blood glucose. All cells of the body utilize glucose as the primary energy source, particularly in the brain, for which glucose provides the only source of fuel.



The National Academy of Sciences recommends keeping carbohydrate intake above 130 grams per day, the minimum amount of glucose utilized by the brain.

Taken From: The Role of Carbohydrates in Your Diet, Part II



Quote:
Not only does a diet lacking in carbohydrates cut off the brain's main energy supply, Greenwood said a scarcity of glucose can impede the synthesis of acetylcholine, one of the brain's key neurotransmitters.

Taken From: The Human Brain - Carbohydrates[/QUOTE]
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#18 Old 11-14-2006, 02:19 AM
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I can relate!



From about 15ish to early 20's is was predominantly O-L

Then I went vegan for almost a year when I was 22ish (I worked at a whole foods type store)

Then went back veg 1-2 years



Slowly I started to "not attach a name to my diet" = omni

If I was cooking which I do most of the time I'd eat plant based 85% of the time and veg the rest (I could never personally prepare meat, nor wanted to bring it in my home. I never did like milk until I became pregnant. (what would taste disgusting and leave a fatty gross residue on my tongue any other time suddenly tasted good- weird)



I always felt like I couldn't give my daughter anything but a veg diet. She tried meat a few time here and there but it always made me wince... that's when I knew I was a veg at heart and it was just a matter of time.



So this is my second and final attempt at veganism I have a feeling it'll 'stick' this time. Now I also have my DP on my side! Today our copy of Vegan Lunch Box also arrived- yippee!



The way we cooked at home was just about vegan (we did use organic butter & yogurt and eggs from my midwife's chickens) so the only REAL transition we have to make is when we are with extended family and out to eat. Shoot, even when I was omni I'd order vegan pizzas ALWAYS make my own nayonaise etc. (I'm weird I guess).



The situation with our extended families is glim though... even when I was veg for 7 years my mother would offer me meat EVERY time I saw her... shessh... his family is no better.



BUT we have each other's support. TOGETHER we can DO it!



perhaps we need the flip-floppers support thread
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#19 Old 11-14-2006, 02:47 AM
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Hi Colorful!



Veganism hasn't been hard for me, since I learned what happens to the animals. But I do activism and I'm constantly exposed to what happens to animals in farming and other industries, so it doesn't fade into that kind of hazy memory that it's "bad, but there are lots of bad things in life, and it can't be all that bad, and..." kind of thing. I think when one is acutely aware of the suffering involved in animal industries, animal products aren't very appealing, and thus there really isn't "willpower" involved. So, if you think of how you're feeling now, when you're in a period of being really aware of animal suffering, and wanting to be vegan, that seems like the key: keep exposing yourself to the reason why you want to be vegan, and if you start to waver, visually remind yourself (which also keeps it out of that overly intellectual realm that cuts people off from the suffering of others).



Maybe you can order some "Why Vegans?" from http://www.whyvegan.com and spend some time each week or month or whatever passing them out with your child?



Follow Your Heart mozarella is kind of expensive, but I think it's o.k. plain. Maybe your mother in law can keep that around for your son?



It's your choice what to put in your body, and, for the most part, your childrens' bodies. So I hope that you won't be bullied by your relatives' preferences.



I think we've talked about it before, but it has always seemed particularly sad to me that humans care so much about our own babies and want to give them everything, and part of how we express that is to rip away the babies of other animals who want their babies just as much as we do (physiology dictates it). So yeah, best of luck. I think veganism is setting a wonderful example of compassion for your children

"If you want to know where you would have stood on slavery before the civil war, don't look at where you stand on slavery today, look at where you stand on animal rights." - Paul Watson.

 

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#20 Old 11-14-2006, 05:44 AM
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i find it interesting that people become pregnant and begin eating meat (and i will ignore the health reasons comments, as they are unfounded and in fact contradicted by medical organizations). so one brings another life into the world and decides, all of the sudden, that other species do not matter? do humans become more important to people when they are pregnant and other animals that they cared for before less important? do other animals' babies appear tasty somehow because you have a baby inside of you? i seriously am wondering what goes on, not trying to intrude.





Yes my baby is important to me a little more than a cow and I won't apologize for that.

Actually that was very hard to write and it figures that somone would pounce on me..or anyone else in the same position.

No the animals were not tasty but I happen to not like a lot of other protein alternatives but I'm not going to sit here and justify all my decisions and how my pregnancy went...basically I was trying to give support to someone.

It was very very hard and I became depressed and losing a child well...

all I can say is shame on you.. you don't know me and you have no idea the hell I went through.

I love the support here.
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#21 Old 11-14-2006, 09:45 AM
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I went back to eating meat because I was mistakenly told that I could not be a vegetarian and be a healthy pregnant woman. It sidetracked me for 4 years. If I were to get pregnant again, I would TRY to not let it sidetrack me again. But I can't make any promises.



Pregnancy cravings are INSANE, and if you don't eat what you crave, it haunts you. Substitutions don't cut it. I've tried.



That said, if you eat a healthy, balanced diet while pregnant, you may not crave meat... but it is hard to get everything 100% right.



So, lunawinds, don't let anyone knock what you did. I know how it is, and if they haven't BTDT, they can't possibly understand.
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#22 Old 11-14-2006, 03:17 PM
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Hi Colorful!



Veganism hasn't been hard for me, since I learned what happens to the animals. But I do activism and I'm constantly exposed to what happens to animals in farming and other industries, so it doesn't fade into that kind of hazy memory that it's "bad, but there are lots of bad things in life, and it can't be all that bad, and..." kind of thing. I think when one is acutely aware of the suffering involved in animal industries, animal products aren't very appealing, and thus there really isn't "willpower" involved. So, if you think of how you're feeling now, when you're in a period of being really aware of animal suffering, and wanting to be vegan, that seems like the key: keep exposing yourself to the reason why you want to be vegan, and if you start to waver, visually remind yourself (which also keeps it out of that overly intellectual realm that cuts people off from the suffering of others).



Maybe you can order some "Why Vegans?" from http://www.whyvegan.com and spend some time each week or month or whatever passing them out with your child?



Follow Your Heart mozarella is kind of expensive, but I think it's o.k. plain. Maybe your mother in law can keep that around for your son?



It's your choice what to put in your body, and, for the most part, your childrens' bodies. So I hope that you won't be bullied by your relatives' preferences.



I think we've talked about it before, but it has always seemed particularly sad to me that humans care so much about our own babies and want to give them everything, and part of how we express that is to rip away the babies of other animals who want their babies just as much as we do (physiology dictates it). So yeah, best of luck. I think veganism is setting a wonderful example of compassion for your children



Hi Irizary! Believe it or not, I have thought of you as I have been transitioning back into veganism. I remember debating with you about eating organic, free-range eggs and milk (a couple of years ago), and I just want you to know that some of the things you said kept coming back to me. Especially that bottom line that, nomater how humanely dairy cows are kept, their cows HAVE to be taken away in order for humans to get their milk. No way around that - except, of course, to be vegan!



Anyway, I guess I just want to thank you for your strong and consistent ethics and let you know that some of the things you said really did make a difference - for me, at least.
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#23 Old 11-14-2006, 03:36 PM
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i'm sorry, but evertime i see this thread I open it, thinking it's about Flip flops (which i ♥ )
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#24 Old 11-14-2006, 04:50 PM
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I love flip-flops too



I can totally relate to your struggle, Colorful. I'm a flip-flopper myself. In my heart, I feel veganism is best. Unfortunately, I constantly second guess myself when it comes to things like health. I've read too much about nutrition, much of which contradicts itself. When it comes to avoiding animal products at home, I really don't find it difficult. My problems come when I try to figure out what is really optimal for my body. Its all just a spiral of thoughts and somewhat hard to explain. Hopefully you have some idea what I'm talking about
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#25 Old 11-14-2006, 06:48 PM
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Colorful, it's very nice of you to write that, and I appreciate it

"If you want to know where you would have stood on slavery before the civil war, don't look at where you stand on slavery today, look at where you stand on animal rights." - Paul Watson.

 

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#26 Old 11-28-2006, 10:24 PM
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I think it's great that you can at least stick to vegetarianism and not go back to eating meat. It's okay if you're not vegan 100% of the time I can't even go Vegan for 1 day without a migraine.
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#27 Old 11-29-2006, 08:27 AM
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danakscully- if you are having migraines going vegan for a day maybe you have an alllergy to something new you're eating that triggers the migraines- possibly soya milk? See a doc about your migraines anyway
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#28 Old 12-01-2006, 10:18 AM
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I think the reason I rarely even think about flip-flopping is that I think of the animal suffering that I am contributing to if I do As far as the contradictory health/nutrition information, pretty much all anti-vegan information is tainted due to the influence of animal agriculture. That's why there is more, for example, negative dairy research in non-US countries: the dairy industry here is too powerful and has most researchers/doctors brainwashed into thinking it is necessary. It is also why the U.S.D.A. food pyramid is still biased toward meat (though now more "fish or poultry"), dairy, and eggs...the majority of those on the "panel" had been or still were part of the animal agriculture industries. Lots of researchers are even afraid to be completely open about the impact of animal products due to many states in the U.S. having laws that make it illegal to say bad things about certain foods! (See The China Study for examples of just how powerful the animal agriculture, medical industry, and sugar industries are in the U.S.)
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#29 Old 12-01-2006, 11:44 AM
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Originally Posted by carabdle View Post

As far as the contradictory health/nutrition information, pretty much all anti-vegan information is tainted due to the influence of animal agriculture.



While I do agree the meat and dairy industry has highly influenced what the American public is told is healthy, I also don't completely trust what pro-veg organizations tell us. No matter what the topic, people will sway the information they share based on what most benefits them and/or their ideals. Even our much loved and referenced China Study has holes in its research. Its very hard to find unbiased sources when it comes to nutrition.
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#30 Old 12-04-2006, 10:42 AM
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Okay, so last night we were at my parents' house. It was the first time in 2 weeks that we've been there for a meal. Initially when we started back to veganism, we allowed our children to eat what was set on the table when we were at their house, and that always includes cheese. However, now that they've been vegan at home for a month, we decided it was time to stop allowing it their grandparents' house, too.



So, as we were setting the table for the meal, my 3-year-old says, "Daddy, can I have some cheese?" and my husband took him aside and explained, "no honey, cheese is made out of cow milk and we don't drink cow's milk." My 3-year-old then erupted into a tantrum. My husband took him into the other room and they had a talk, and then came back to the table cheerful and peaceful. My 3-year-old went on to eat a mustard sandwich (he didn't want peanut butter!) and some fruit.



HOWEVER, when they came back to the table, the table was SILENT. My mom, who is usually the most talkative person in the family, didn't say a word. When I tried making conversation, she answered in one-word answers in kind of a soft, sad voice. Then after awhile, she disappeared upstairs for about 10 minutes. AWKWARD! As soon as we were done eating and helping clean up, we got out of there!



So, obviously we have offended her. (I don't know about my dad, he was acting normal as far as I could tell). Some of you may have read my other thread about sending Meat Your Meet to my parents this week. Well, they responded well to it, we actually had a conversation about it earlier in the day yesterday and they are taking steps to buy only organic and free range meat now. When they told us that, we were so supportive, we said we thought it was great that they were doing that because they were sending the message that they were willing to pay more for better treatment of animals.



Anyway...I guess I expected them to have some understanding for WHY we have given up dairy. We are just trying to be consistent with our kids. Easier to get them off cheese when they are 3 and 1 than when they are older. They probably won't even remember a time when they ate dairy, eventually.



Thanks for listening! I'm sure this will blow over eventually, it just sucks right now!
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