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-   -   Making the Film 'Okja' Turned Director Bong Joon Ho into a Vegan (https://www.veggieboards.com/forum/60-vegan-support-forum/225690-making-film-okja-turned-director-bong-joon-ho-into-vegan.html)

Werewolf Girl 06-28-2017 10:28 PM

Making the Film 'Okja' Turned Director Bong Joon Ho into a Vegan
 
http://cutprintfilm.com/wp-content/u...girl-woods.jpg

Quote:

The new Netflix movie is a searing look at the mass production of meat.

At first glance Korean director Bong Joon Ho's latest feature for Netflix is a love story between a young girl and her beloved pet. But just as Ho's last big North American film, Snowpiercer was about capitalism's dire effects on our physical environment and climate change's resulting class war, Okja is a searing look at the environmental and cultural impact of our mass production and consumption of meat.
Read the rest here: https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/v...=vicetwitterus

Has anyone seen this on Netflix yet?

Emma JC 06-29-2017 10:21 AM

I just heard about this film on Jimmy Fallon's show last night and so we will be watching it this weekend and I will report back when I do. That is so cool that the director would become vegan.

I was also just watching a YouTube video by 'that vegan couple' about a 7 year old girl that no longer wants to eat meat and it led me to a whole bunch of other videos of children being upset about having to eat meat. Children are so empathetic and caring and may help to lead the way to a kinder, gentler, healthier world.

Emma JC

Werewolf Girl 07-07-2017 12:11 AM

It made me cry. :cry:

Emma JC 07-07-2017 10:11 AM

We did watch it this past weekend and I am not sure how I feel about it.

It was very sad and yet a bit hopeful.

I had recommended it to family, before watching it, and then had to contact them and suggest they not watch it due to the language. I don't have a problem with it, they are more sensitive and I knew that the language would turn them off.

There was a bit of a paradox in that it is wrong to eat the pet pig and yet not wrong to eat the fish or the chicken - so the message was really about "corporate food farming" rather than veganism itself. Corporate food farming is definitely an issue worth making a film about and so in that sense it was successful.

I would watch "what the health" again, not sure I would want to watch this again.

Emma JC

Mr. H. 09-26-2017 08:56 AM

Not that I am one of them, but there are reasonable people who believe the eggs from backyard chickens are "OK" ethically.

I loved that they rescued the baby super pig. but what was he doing there with his mama and papa. I don't think factory farmed pig children are kept in a different place than the animals being sent to slaughter.

Also I haven't seen anyone else ask this: is Okja pregnant at the end of the film?

Jamie in Chile 09-26-2017 08:09 PM

The film is a cut above, irrerevent, original and as well as benefiting from some gorgeous scenery at the start. Probably not quite a truly great movie - but then few are. It's very pro vegan in a broad sense, although yes it is more clearly against factory farming really. It is less clear cut in the movie whether it is pro militant animal activism or not, you can judge for yourself but that could be read either way to me.

SapphireLightning 09-26-2017 10:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr. H. (Post 4110220)
Not that I am one of them, but there are reasonable people who believe the eggs from backyard chickens are "OK" ethically.

I wonder if those people ever wonder where all the roosters are? I have never ever seen a backyard chicken coop where the rooster to hen ratio was anywhere near 1 to 1.

Mr. H. 09-27-2017 09:50 AM

I am no expert on chickens. but I am pretty sure that you don't want a 1:1 ratio. That would be way too many roosters. Also I don't thing roosters get along with other roosters. My best guess is that you want just one rooster per coop.



Quote:

Originally Posted by SapphireLightning (Post 4110256)
I wonder if those people ever wonder where all the roosters are? I have never ever seen a backyard chicken coop where the rooster to hen ratio was anywhere near 1 to 1.


Mr. H. 09-27-2017 09:56 AM

Yes, I think the writer director purposely left that to be unclear or open-ended.

I did feel that they painted the ALF members sympathetically. Heck they even made them out to be heroic. I bet if someone analyzed we would find they as a group displayed many of the classical virtues.

But in the end they didn't succeed in their mission. and they were also sometimes comical.

Maybe the movie isn't pro-vegan. or pro animal rights, but just anti big greedy immoral corporations.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jamie in Chile (Post 4110252)
It is less clear cut in the movie whether it is pro militant animal activism or not, you can judge for yourself but that could be read either way to me.


Jamie in Chile 09-27-2017 03:38 PM

Godwin's law asserts that "As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Hitler approaches 1."

I am making a new version of this law. I'll call it Fox's law.

"As an online discussion abot veganism grows longer, the probability of someone mentioning backyard chickens approaches 1."

SapphireLightning 09-27-2017 04:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr. H. (Post 4110258)
I am no expert on chickens. but I am pretty sure that you don't want a 1:1 ratio. That would be way too many roosters. Also I don't thing roosters get along with other roosters. My best guess is that you want just one rooster per coop.

That as the crux of my point. Chickens are born in a near 1:1 ratio, so if these people with their "ethical hens" and "ethical eggs" get mostly hens, then each "ethical" hen they buy involves a hatchling male chicken being ground up. Since egg farms (as well as dairy farms) need only the females for production this gives rise to people thinking that all chickens lay eggs or all cows produce milk, or they simply do not even think about the males as they see all females and equate what they see as "chicken" or "cow".

Mr. H. 09-27-2017 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SapphireLightning (Post 4110284)
That as the crux of my point. Chickens are born in a near 1:1 ratio, so if these people with their "ethical hens" and "ethical eggs" get mostly hens, then each "ethical" hen they buy involves a hatchling male chicken being ground up. Since egg farms (as well as dairy farms) need only the females for production this gives rise to people thinking that all chickens lay eggs or all cows produce milk, or they simply do not even think about the males as they see all females and equate what they see as "chicken" or "cow".

Oh, OH! I never thought about it that way. GOOD POINT!

Jamie in Chile 09-28-2017 03:46 PM

But that point is more important if the person that has backyard chickens has purchased them from a commercial source and would not apply to hens that were rescued in some way. In the first case, the person that purchased the hens has provided financial support for the killing of the males and probably caused more of it to happen, but in the second case neither is the case.

SapphireLightning 09-28-2017 10:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jamie in Chile (Post 4110296)
But that point is more important if the person that has backyard chickens has purchased them from a commercial source and would not apply to hens that were rescued in some way. In the first case, the person that purchased the hens has provided financial support for the killing of the males and probably caused more of it to happen, but in the second case neither is the case.

True, but it depends on what type of rescue it is too. If the rescue hens were taken from a farm against the farm owner's wishes, they will simply buy extra chicks to compensate, thus more chicks being bred and more male chicks being killed. This is a double-edge to doing A.L.F style rescues, if it isn't massive enough it may not shut down that farm, and just cause them to order more.
Regardless, chickens do not belong to humans, and nor do the eggs that chickens produce. Let the chickens eat their own eggs to regain calcium, protein and calories, and save yourself the negative health effects of eggs... *shrug*

Jamie in Chile 09-29-2017 12:08 PM

OK, good point, I hadn't thought about that type of rescue. I guess it depends on exactly what we mean by rescue.


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