If you don't want to die from a heart attack..... - Page 2 - VeggieBoards
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#31 Old 01-08-2017, 04:20 PM
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Studies don't prove much or as much as they want to.
We all grow up differently and we all have a slight different genetics, than we get take part in a study, about 20% lying about their habits and so it goes on.
)

Peer-reviewed studies are designed to minimize these inaccuracies.
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Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/
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#32 Old 01-08-2017, 06:05 PM
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I think people lying about their habits could be a problem in studies, especially when there is a systematic reason to one to twist opinions in one particular way.

We did a survey at school about whether we had taken drugs and specific questions about drugs and as much as the survey said that it was anonymous and so on after the survey everyone said as if anyone who was on drugs would write it down in a school classroom in front of their teacher.

It's not at all obvious how a thorough or peer reviewed study could eliminate such systematic errors.

In the example of a survey about food or lifestyle people may have a tendency to exaggerate the amount of exercise they do or good food they eat and underestimate their junk food or whatever.

However my gut feeling is that this is not going to be a major issue. There's not going to be enough of an incentive for enough adults to want to lie to cause the results to be wrong. So I think in general the types of studies mentioned by David can be trusted. Probably. Especially where you have 2-3 agreeing with each other.
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#33 Old 01-08-2017, 06:23 PM
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No, I call Dr. Gregers work very necessary and informative. Your interpretation is more what I'm calling scare tactics. From your posts I get the same impression that omnivores have of vegan diets being difficult, and should only be attempted with very careful planning. The typical omni is given the pass on nutrition as if eating animal products fill all the holes in nutrition. That's not true.
There are certain considerations with vegan diets, namely B12, but really, as long as a variety of foods are consumed, they're no or less better or worse as their equal omnivore counterparts.
People have a way of comparing processed vegan foods with organic pasture fed animal meats and that's not realistic
There are fewer people willing to eat vegan for health, and that's a very small fraction of people eating for health. Every ex vegan story has been truly more about convenience, taste, and OCD than any true health issue. Please submit evidence otherwise, because the research is abundant in vegan health.

I've run the gamut of speaking out animal rights, better nutrition, to simply joining in on discussions on food. I've done more to inspire people to eat to make vegan meals and feel positively about vegans in general by making them realize it's a better way. You don't do that from nitpicking health when that's not on their agenda. Fast food is still growing mainstream because that's what people but. If they offer vegan versions that people buy they're basically advocating going vegan. People buy and eat what they do out need and convenience, not because they're ok with animal cruelty.
Recipe exchanges are a great way to change what people eat, and far more likely to stick
Well call me alarmist then and not at all satisfied with ever hearing that an ex-vegan is making the rounds and betraying the critters yet again. I guess you and I have different levels of intensity and passion on this issue of eating healthy for their sake as well as my own. And if something that I'm interested in is NOT on someone else agenda, they won't read it. But for the person who has perhaps been thinking that cleaning up his eating habits, vegan that he is, it's possible that that video is just the one that they need to see. But you attempting to shut down my efforts to give it another airing, does no one any good.

Sometimes a recipe exchange is perfect and sometimes other information and education is needed. None of us can be the only and final arbiter of what is required by any given person at a particular moment. My suggestion that vegans here watch the video for a quick refresher on what's healthy was not being made to encourage someone to go vegan or vegetarian, it was directed at people who already are.

Let me ask you directly, what do you think the higher AA numbers and the higher homocysteine and the omega 6 numbers mean as far as veg'n health goes? Are you suggesting that having way higher numbers than meat eaters is interpreted differently because we are veg'n? He's saying that we're consuming 4x the level of omega 6's that we should be for one thing, but that's okay where the meat eater consuming less than 2x the ideal is not good for their health?

I still can't believe that I'm here defending encouraging people to watch Dr. Greger's video. Black is white I guess.

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#34 Old 01-09-2017, 01:55 AM
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No, I call Dr. Gregers work very necessary and informative. Your interpretation is more what I'm calling scare tactics. From your posts I get the same impression that omnivores have of vegan diets being difficult, and should only be attempted with very careful planning. The typical omni is given the pass on nutrition as if eating animal products fill all the holes in nutrition. That's not true.
There are certain considerations with vegan diets, namely B12, but really, as long as a variety of foods are consumed, they're no or less better or worse as their equal omnivore counterparts.
People have a way of comparing processed vegan foods with organic pasture fed animal meats and that's not realistic
There are fewer people willing to eat vegan for health, and that's a very small fraction of people eating for health. Every ex vegan story has been truly more about convenience, taste, and OCD than any true health issue. Please submit evidence otherwise, because the research is abundant in vegan health.

I've run the gamut of speaking out animal rights, better nutrition, to simply joining in on discussions on food. I've done more to inspire people to eat to make vegan meals and feel positively about vegans in general by making them realize it's a better way. You don't do that from nitpicking health when that's not on their agenda. Fast food is still growing mainstream because that's what people but. If they offer vegan versions that people buy they're basically advocating going vegan. People buy and eat what they do out need and convenience, not because they're ok with animal cruelty.
Recipe exchanges are a great way to change what people eat, and far more likely to stick
The last thing I'm going to say on this subject silva, every time I've heard an ex-vegan story, the initial reason they quit is because they 'didn't feel good, no energy, blah, blah, blah'. And for your information, I have never heard a single ex-vegan who went back to eating meat, justify it by citing a need for convenience. Never said they were OKAY with animal cruelty but am inferring that they looked past it and ignored it because 'they didn't feel good' and then they also all declare that once they started eating meat again, all of a sudden they felt so much better. Also your suggestion that I gave an omnivorous diet a 'pass' is false and you know that. Reread every post here and tell me where I did that.

You're the only one that I've ever heard comparing processed vegan foods to pasture raised meat. And my daughters boyfriend went vegan for health (he's a body builder who has several businesses in the industry) and the animal welfare aspect came later.

I'm still waiting to hear what you have to say about the higher Omega 6 numbers and higher homocysteine numbers that Dr. Greger cited all of which are obviously detrimental to our health outcomes. Apparently he was concerned enough that he felt it necessary to do the video and talk about it to people like you and me. You have just chosen to not listen. Perhaps the claims to better health are what could happen if you ate a balanced vegan diet with a surplus of the appropriate whole foods but the reality is what Dr. Greger was talking about.
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#35 Old 01-09-2017, 02:38 AM
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You're twisting just about everything I've written!
I didn't say ex-vegans honestly say they just wanted to eat steak, no, they tell you how they almost died trying. I said it's B.S., that's nutritional advice is literaly everywhere and following a poor diet is on you whether you eat animals or not. I've never heard an ex vegan say they're just going to have a can of oysters or bugs now and then to balance things out, it's more an orgasmic experience of eating steak.
I also knew someone go plant based to save their health, with vegan coming later. I also know far more people who won't consider it for the same reason they don't eat healthier anyway.



I took out your thread from the vegetarian section because our tos state that that section be inclusive of lacto/veg people, free from scrutiny, and there were complaints.

I'm all for doing your research, I esp follow Dr Greger, but as others have pointed out, you've added drama to his words. Unless you're omni concerned with both animals and total nutrition, your kind of spin will do nothing to help them change. while whole food diets are certainly the healthiest way to go, most people don't follow them, not on meat, not as vegans
I've already pointed out how easy it is to get full DHA as a vegan. I supplement daily, as well as limit processed oils and walnuts and flax are a staple. You make it sound way harder than needs to be, something Dr Greger never does!

VB is full of health related topics, as well as links to them. I've posted many myself. I'm not saying to ignore the health aspects of any diet, just that I feel you're making eating vegan sound quite limited and would only encourage a group already open to eating that way. You make it sound following an omni diet is actually preferable
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#36 Old 01-09-2017, 07:45 AM
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I've merged the thread posted in the vegetarian forum as this is directed at vegans
Many thanks silva for this and all the other stuff you're doing.

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#37 Old 01-09-2017, 08:03 AM
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And my daughters boyfriend went vegan for health (he's a body builder who has several businesses in the industry) and the animal welfare aspect came later.
I think you mean that he went on a total plant-food diet for health? Going vegan is more than going on a diet.

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#38 Old 01-11-2017, 04:54 PM
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Did you watch the video or are you just jumping right in there to blast me?
Your thread title is alarmist and shows a lack of information, and vegans who suffer from heart attacks are rare. Causes of vegan heart attacks are often related to things like unrelated drug use (River Phoenix didn't die because he was vegan, he died of an overdose) OR they refuse to supplement B12 ( this is just dumb and isn't as common as it probably was 40 years ago) OR they really are Omega 3 deficient. Only pregnant women, small children and people over 60 absolutely have to supplement DHA, most vegans can make EPA from ALA in flax seeds or walnuts or fortified foods (flax seeds are the most commonly recommended source, or cold flax oil).

Yeah your posts are alarmist and it irks me.

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#39 Old 01-12-2017, 07:02 PM
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I think you mean that he went on a total plant-food diet for health? Going vegan is more than going on a diet.

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Yes, my mistake, I was writing when it was very late and I misspoke.
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#40 Old 01-12-2017, 07:07 PM
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Your thread title is alarmist and shows a lack of information, and vegans who suffer from heart attacks are rare. Causes of vegan heart attacks are often related to things like unrelated drug use (River Phoenix didn't die because he was vegan, he died of an overdose) OR they refuse to supplement B12 ( this is just dumb and isn't as common as it probably was 40 years ago) OR they really are Omega 3 deficient. Only pregnant women, small children and people over 60 absolutely have to supplement DHA, most vegans can make EPA from ALA in flax seeds or walnuts or fortified foods (flax seeds are the most commonly recommended source, or cold flax oil).

Yeah your posts are alarmist and it irks me.
A little hyperbole is often used in titles in order to catch the eye of the quickly scanning online reader. With so much available to read online, it’s a technique used to catch peoples attention. I’m sorry if it bothers you but that was the only intention.

I never mentioned River Phoenix and actually didn’t even know he was a vegan.

Regarding B12, yes, I’ve commented on that and stressed the importance of supplementing, and I think you argued with me on that one too despite the fact that my only concern is that people remember/know that they need to do it. Hmmm, did I include a video on that one too, I’ll have to go check that.

As far as the Omega 3’s in our diets, well that is exactly the concern that Dr. Greger is pointing to as per the study that he was looking at. During the video, he includes a table that show that while the ideal for our Omega 6’s is 4, vegetarians and vegans were 10 and 15 respectively while the meat eaters number was 7 (considerably lower than the veg’n). That is one of the things that concerned him, a medical professional and so I brought it here to show vegans and vegetarians that we need to be aware if we want optimum health.

The second table he showed, our homocysteine levels, indicated that while it should be less than 10 ?, meat eaters have a level of 12, vegetarians is 17 and vegans, 27. Frankly, he seemed a little alarmed by both sets of those numbers himself because remember, homocysteine is directly connected to arterial damage in the heart.

Now personally, I’m a bit of a health nut and give a lot of attention to what I eat. Not to say that I’m perfect by any means, but I do think about it carefully and I pay attention to what the vegan nutrition experts are saying. As a result, I figured that some other folks, who might feel likewise might like to hear the information that Dr. Greger felt was important enough to make a video to cover.

In fact the Omega imbalances he talks about, directly cause the very problem you yourself mention (Omega 3 deficiency and problems with deficiency of DHA and EPA which are a result of the over abundance that the study showed, of Omega 6’s. He’s talking about it, you’re talking about it and I shared his video.

What I don’t understand is the level of animosity that you seem to feel. I haven’t been rude to you, I’ve shared important information (that even you have alluded to although worded differently)…..and yet here you are, giving me grief. So here's my 'passive aggressive' question for you, would you like me to go away? Just not post a thread, no comments......just fade away into the sunset? Because I'll tell you, you've made me feel very unwelcome.

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#41 Old 01-12-2017, 07:14 PM
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Going vegan is more than going on a diet.

This is incorrect. It depends on your definition of "vegan." There are dietary vegans and lifestyle vegans. Many people (I'd guess most people), when they hear the word "vegan," assume the dietary definition, meaning someone who abstains from food that contains animal products. Such an individual is a dietary vegan. A lifestyle vegan also abstains from animal products aside not only in food, but in all (or most things), including leather shoes, etc.

However, all of it is a matter of degree, whether dietary or lifestyle. Many people, for example, consider themselves lifestyle vegans yet use hand soap at public restrooms, despite the soap being non-vegan, or put sugar in their coffee at a restaurant, despite not knowing if it was produced with bone char, or feed their cats non-vegan cat food, or drive cars that have non-vegan parts. As I said, a matter of degree.

Regardless, a dietary vegan can be vegan for ethics, health, the environment, or all of the above. Such an individual may or may not be a lifestyle vegan.
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#42 Old 01-13-2017, 04:51 AM
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This is incorrect. It depends on your definition of "vegan."
As Joanne Stepaniak says in her book Being Vegan in answer to the question:

Can I call myself vegan if I still use, eat, or wear a few products that contain animal ingredients?

According to the most concise definitions set forth by the Vegan Society (UK), the American Vegan Society, and the Oxford English Dictionaries, the word vegan refers to "a person who does not eat or use animal products". Therefore, using, ingesting, or wearing products derived from animals does not comply with the accepted definition of vegan. Nevertheless, animal by-products are so pervasive that it is sometimes impossible to avoid them. In addition, vegan alternatives are not yet obtainable for all animal based commodities, so vegans must, by necessity, make a few concessions.


I've never understood why a person would want to call themself a vegan (and so redefine the term) when they have no apparent intention to stop 'using animals'. If it's a diet thing, why not accept that they are 'total plant-food eaters'? The same redefinition thing also applies to omnis who want to call themselves vegetarians but still want to carry on eating fish/chicken/beef etc (think Penny in Big Bang Theory!).

To finish off with Ms Stepaniak, she says: To understand the difference between the words vegetarianand vegan, and to appreciate their full meaning, it is important to investigate their histories. The term vegetarian was devised soley to describe diet - nothing else. On the other hand, the term vegan encompasses far more than just what one eats. It is - and has always been - a philosophy of compassionate living, and this is a vital distinction.

So Dilettante, you can redefine and so dilute the meaning of the word vegan all you want, so helping confuse omnis, but I won't be aiding and abetting you.

Good wishes

LV.
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#43 Old 01-13-2017, 06:27 AM
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So Dilettante, you can redefine and so dilute the meaning of the word vegan all you want, so helping confuse omnis, but I won't be aiding and abetting you.'

I'm not trying to "dilute" anything, nor, I trust am I "confusing" omnis. What I said is correct. There are, in fact, multiple definitions of "vegan." Probably the most common one, that most people mean when they use the word, is dietary vegan. If you mean lifestyle vegan when you say "going vegan," that's fine, as long as it's clear what you mean (clarifying it wouldn't hurt).

Here is a quote from the Wikipedia entry ion "veganism." All sentences are footnoted to sources in the original:

"Distinctions are sometimes made between several categories of veganism. Dietary vegans refrain from ingesting animal products. This means avoiding not only meat but also egg and dairy products and other animal-derived foodstuffs. Some dietary vegans choose to wear clothing that includes animal products (for example, leather or wool). The term ethical vegan is often applied to those who extend the philosophy beyond diet into other areas of their lives. This philosophy means opposing the use of animal products for any purpose."

I think this is a perfect synopsis of how the terms "veganism" and hence "vegan" are used.

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#44 Old 01-13-2017, 06:43 AM
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On a separate topic, leedsveg, I believe I am also correct in that "vegan" is a matter of degree. Even on this forum, I have seen people who are adamant at calling themselves "vegan" say that it's no big deal to take pills when they're sick if the pills have gelatin in them. I tend to agree with them. They are, in fact, vegan, though not as strict at being so as some other vegans are. Some (probably most) vegans, when out at a restaurant or at an omni friend's house, will eat bread or drink wine without asking whether it contains trace animal product or, in the case of wine, was filtered with eisenglass. Others will not. Either way, they're vegans, as far as I'm concerned. I have also, on this forum, seen people who are adamant at calling themselves "vegan" say that they feed their cats non-vegan cat food. Same when it comes to using soap in public restrooms, despite most soap containing animal products. Again, as I said, veganism is a matter of degree.

For the record, I do not call myself "vegan." I call myself a "vegetarian," though I eat vegan almost all of the time, with the exception of occasional cheese in social situations. Many people I know think that I'm vegan, though I don't actually say that I am vegan even in "real life" and certainly not in a forum like this, where people guard the word "vegan" very strictly.

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#45 Old 01-13-2017, 07:16 AM
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I'm not trying to dilute anything.
In effect you are, and I really don't know why. A 'health vegan' (sic) may be told by their physician that having fish in their diet is healthier than not, and BINGO!!! they start eating fish, so that omnis now understand that 'vegans eat fish' (sic).

Joanna Stepaniak again:

There are no such entities as "part-time vegans", "partial vegans" or "dietary vegans" People who just have a plant-based diet are not vegans; they are total vegetarians. Until one's committment extends beyond the scope of food, the word vegan does not apply, regardless of how the media or certain individuals or groups wish to employ it.

Maybe in the era of Trump where language is rapidly losing all meaning, and people want to ignore the wider world and fixate more and more on navel-gazing, it can't be too surprising. Disappointing yes, but surprising? Not much.

Good wishes

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#46 Old 01-13-2017, 07:43 AM
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In effect you are, and I really don't know why.

Ah, some type of insinuation regarding my motives? Where have I seen this before?

No, what I'm saying is that "vegan" has multiple definitions. If you want to use the lifestyle or ethical definition, fine. I just don't think that's the one most people use when they say "vegan." I think that in ordinary usage, the dietary definition is more common.

Moreover, this thread is about heart attacks. Clearly this is a dietary issue, so for the purpose of this thread, I think the dietary definition makes the most sense.

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#47 Old 01-13-2017, 08:29 AM
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Going vegan is more than going on a diet.

This is incorrect. It depends on your definition of "vegan." There are dietary vegans and lifestyle vegans. Many people (I'd guess most people), when they hear the word "vegan," assume the dietary definition, meaning someone who abstains from food that contains animal products. Such an individual is a dietary vegan. A lifestyle vegan also abstains from animal products aside not only in food, but in all (or most things), including leather shoes, etc.

However, all of it is a matter of degree, whether dietary or lifestyle. Many people, for example, consider themselves lifestyle vegans yet use hand soap at public restrooms, despite the soap being non-vegan, or put sugar in their coffee at a restaurant, despite not knowing if it was produced with bone char, or feed their cats non-vegan cat food, or drive cars that have non-vegan parts. As I said, a matter of degree.

Regardless, a dietary vegan can be vegan for ethics, health, the environment, or all of the above. Such an individual may or may not be a lifestyle vegan.
In the context of this discussion, what does all of this mean and to what purpose? We've been talking about diet and the eating habits of vegans (whether lifestyle or ethical or health focussed).

'Total vegetarian' if one is only focussed on diet seems to me to be a fair representation.
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#48 Old 01-13-2017, 02:01 PM
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Going vegan is more than going on a diet.

This is incorrect. It depends on your definition of "vegan." There are dietary vegans and lifestyle vegans. Many people (I'd guess most people), when they hear the word "vegan," assume the dietary definition
I think the statement "going vegan is more than going on a diet" is quite fair, and although I often agree with your many good posts, I tend to disagree with you in this particular occassion.

It is a bit of a grey area but I think that "vegan" automatically means or strongly implies "lifestyle vegan" and those two terms are fairly equivalent. Yes you might say "lifestyle vegan" for absolute clarity.

I think most knowledgeable vegans or real authories on the matter would agree with this. In general discussion with omnivores that might not be the case, however, but you could argue that this is due to a lack of understanding in the general population.

I am not sure about "total plant-food diet" though. I think dietary vegan is sort of clearer. And I think it makes sense. And I think saying things like "went vegan for health reasons" or "went vegan to cut environmental impacts" sort of implies dietary vegan, and I don't think it's a wrong use of vegan either, except perhaps in a strictly correct and pedantic sense, but not the sort of thing that needs correcting.

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#49 Old 01-13-2017, 02:04 PM
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This whole thread has seemed a bit feisty to me. I keep seeing people making slightly aggressive or annoyed looking posts even though the other person has not really been rude or said anything bad. It's just a difffence in opinion.
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#50 Old 01-13-2017, 02:26 PM
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Only pregnant women, small children and people over 60 absolutely have to supplement DHA, most vegans can make EPA from ALA in flax seeds or walnuts or fortified foods.
You may ultimately be proved correct, but I don't think there have been enough studies done to say for sure.

It is my understanding that there have been insufficient studies done to say for sure how efficiently vegans convert ALA to EPA and then ultimately DHA.

http://www.theveganrd.com/2010/11/mo...gan-diets.html
http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/omega3
http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/...d-DHA-omega-3s

The second of these links has some good detail on this.

This may turn out to be over cautious, but for the time being my reading of the evidence is to either

A - take a blood test of DHA every few years
OR
B - supplement DHA
OR possibly (?)
C - eat a very large amount of ALA to beat weak conversion efficiency

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#51 Old 01-13-2017, 02:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Dilettante View Post
Going vegan is more than going on a diet.

This is incorrect. It depends on your definition of "vegan." There are dietary vegans and lifestyle vegans. Many people (I'd guess most people), when they hear the word "vegan," assume the dietary definition, meaning someone who abstains from food that contains animal products. Such an individual is a dietary vegan. A lifestyle vegan also abstains from animal products aside not only in food, but in all (or most things), including leather shoes, etc.

However, all of it is a matter of degree, whether dietary or lifestyle. Many people, for example, consider themselves lifestyle vegans yet use hand soap at public restrooms, despite the soap being non-vegan, or put sugar in their coffee at a restaurant, despite not knowing if it was produced with bone char, or feed their cats non-vegan cat food, or drive cars that have non-vegan parts. As I said, a matter of degree.

Regardless, a dietary vegan can be vegan for ethics, health, the environment, or all of the above. Such an individual may or may not be a lifestyle vegan.
I have always heard that someone who eats vegan but does not adhere to other parts of the lifestyle (clothing, not going to zoos...), is called a vegetarian.
We think of vegetarians as someone who eats no meat, but eats dairy and eggs, but correctly they would be called lacto-ovo-vegetarians. Vegetarians are diet vegans.
I believe those are the actual definitions. We just choose to use the watered down versions of definitions, perhaps because it's easier to just say you're vegetarian than to say the entire lacto-ovo-vegetarian word.
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#52 Old 01-13-2017, 03:54 PM
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This entire second page is terribly off topic. I tried to make a separate thread and move these posts but it either isn't as easy as I expected, or will take a bit of work!

Please stay on topic, which is omega3's/dha and vegan health!

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#53 Old 01-13-2017, 04:09 PM
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One thing I don't quite understand is that omega 3's are found primarily in flaxseeds, followed by walnuts- the only meat containing omega 3's or DHA is fish! I've never known many people who eat much fish- it's hardly an omnivorous requirement, so why all the finger pointing at veg'ns? Algae oil is just as good a supplement as fish oil.
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?d...tname=nutrient

Aren't omnis known for consuming more processed oils than veg'ns?

Just seems that veg'ns (and I'm saying veg'ns rather than vegans because egg yolk contains little- unless hens are fed flaxseed!) get stereotyped as needing such stringent diets
I again reiterate that most feedback I get from omnis is they feel you have to be so super careful in maintaining a vegan diet. Much of that thought comes from ex vegans who say they just couldn't stay healthy and 'needed' to go back to animal proteins. I call bunk on that. If they were so sorry that their health required them to consume animals, why do they choose such tasty foods rather than the most lesser life forms to bring back their sorry health? It's just not that hard,and I don't believe from my own charting of diet, that eating a form of the SAD diet in vegan terms is any worse than omni

Every one should research any dietary change. B12, calcium, protein, and yes, a proper ratio -or better- some algael DHA supplements is necessary information

Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good
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#54 Old 01-14-2017, 05:22 AM
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This entire second page is terribly off topic. I tried to make a separate thread and move these posts but it either isn't as easy as I expected, or will take a bit of work!

Please stay on topic, which is omega3's/dha and vegan health!
Sorry that I'm partly to blame silva. I've now posted stuff on the new thread. Having been a mod, I appreciate your time and effort and I'll try to behave in future!

Lv
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#55 Old 01-14-2017, 05:36 AM
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Sorry that I'm partly to blame silva. I've now posted stuff on the new thread. Having been a mod, I appreciate your time and effort and I'll try to behave in future!

Lv
No problem--except I can't figure out how to get these posts over there I don't have time to play with it now
It's easy to ideas to snowball and we did need a separate thread for that one! It gets triggered in many threads.

Thanks everyone!

Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good
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#56 Old 01-16-2017, 10:06 AM
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The reason omega 3 might be an issue for vegans is because they don't eat fish. For omnivores that don't eat fish, of course it's just as likely to be an issue as far as I know.
Hydrogen and Dilettante like this.
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#57 Old 01-16-2017, 10:28 AM
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The reason omega 3 might be an issue for vegans is because they don't eat fish. For omnivores that don't eat fish, of course it's just as likely to be an issue as far as I know.

Exactly. There is plenty of omega 3 that's not in fish, but it's in ALA form, which is inefficiently converted to DHA and EPA in the human body. Both vegans and non-vegans can easily get ALA, but DHA and EPA are harder. DHA and EPA are common in fish, and vegans can get them in algal oil, but that's a specialty item only recently available and with a relatively high price tag. So the real question is: are humans fine with just ALA, or are they better off with DHA/EPA in their diet? It's hard to say, but I take an algal oil pill every day, just in case.

But yes, Jamie, to larger point: vegans who don't take algal oil, and omnis who don't eat fish or take fish/algal oil supplements, are in the same boat when it comes to Omega 3.
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#58 Old 01-16-2017, 12:11 PM
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Yes, my mistake, I was writing when it was very late and I misspoke.
No problem DebrahM- easily done.

Lv
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